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Old 02-14-2013, 05:20 PM
 
Location: Branson, Missouri
620 posts, read 1,019,631 times
Reputation: 447

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Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
Maybe after you look at these maps, you'll see the South Midland dialect I'm referring to. And maybe you'll quit trying to start these ridiculous fights. I am referring to the South Midland dialect mapped out by the University of Pennsylvania. This is the most widely accepted study of English. Google "South Midland" dialect and you will almost exclusively get maps modeled after this.

NYC dialect samples

National Map
Ok and how does that show that ANYWHERE in Iowa is part of the "south midland dialect region" I see it as midland, it is in no way south midland though.
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Old 02-14-2013, 05:34 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,461,919 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imbored198824 View Post
Ok and how does that show that ANYWHERE in Iowa is part of the "south midland dialect region" I see it as midland, it is in no way south midland though.
It shows that the extreme southern portion of Iowa is South Midland. Look closer at the map. If you can't see it, I guess I can't help you. That's not even the point I'm trying to make here. I'm trying to show that that accent is not Southern. And if you're going to discount this map, keep in mind you are dismissing professional linguists.
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Old 02-14-2013, 05:38 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,461,919 times
Reputation: 1018
Quote:
Originally Posted by imbored198824 View Post
Ok and how does that show that ANYWHERE in Iowa is part of the "south midland dialect region" I see it as midland, it is in no way south midland though.
While this is a great study, the lines are obviously not exact. IF you expect that, that's insane. However, South Midland is the only type of dialect this could be if it's not General American, or North Midland, which is what characterizes most of Iowa. Obviously there is no exactly line, and to include the remaining tiny portion of northern missouri and extreme southern Iowa isn't exactly hurting things that much.

You can fuss and complain all you want, but this map is as close a representation of the boundary of American dialects as you will ever find.
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Old 02-14-2013, 05:53 PM
 
Location: Branson, Missouri
620 posts, read 1,019,631 times
Reputation: 447
Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
While this is a great study, the lines are obviously not exact. IF you expect that, that's insane. However, South Midland is the only type of dialect this could be if it's not General American, or North Midland, which is what characterizes most of Iowa. Obviously there is no exactly line, and to include the remaining tiny portion of northern missouri and extreme southern Iowa isn't exactly hurting things that much.

You can fuss and complain all you want, but this map is as close a representation of the boundary of American dialects as you will ever find.
You are confusing midland speech with south midland speech. The maps you have provided in no way show any area in Iowa displaying south midland speech, dont personally attack me for your inability to display appropriate maps to back up your claims. Show me one map where Iowa is shown to be SOUTH MIDLAND, and I will believe you. If you actually look at the map you display it shows Iowa to be entrenched in north midland speech. This is also a prior post by you "South Midland is NOT a variety of Southern dialect. South Midland covers at least half of Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio, and Kansas, and is bounded on the south by the Ohio River. " Are you now saying south midland speech extends into iowa, when before it didn't even cover the northern part of Missouri?
The North Midland region stretches from east to west across central and southern Ohio, central Indiana, central Illinois, Iowa, and northern Missouri, as well as Nebraska and northern Kansas where it begins to blend into the West. Major cities of this dialect area include Kansas City, Omaha, St. Louis, Columbus, Ohio, Cincinnati, and Indianapolis.
I AM WAITING

Last edited by imbored198824; 02-14-2013 at 06:16 PM..
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Old 02-14-2013, 09:28 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,461,919 times
Reputation: 1018
Quote:
Originally Posted by imbored198824 View Post
You are confusing midland speech with south midland speech. The maps you have provided in no way show any area in Iowa displaying south midland speech, dont personally attack me for your inability to display appropriate maps to back up your claims. Show me one map where Iowa is shown to be SOUTH MIDLAND, and I will believe you. If you actually look at the map you display it shows Iowa to be entrenched in north midland speech. This is also a prior post by you "South Midland is NOT a variety of Southern dialect. South Midland covers at least half of Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio, and Kansas, and is bounded on the south by the Ohio River. " Are you now saying south midland speech extends into iowa, when before it didn't even cover the northern part of Missouri?
The North Midland region stretches from east to west across central and southern Ohio, central Indiana, central Illinois, Iowa, and northern Missouri, as well as Nebraska and northern Kansas where it begins to blend into the West. Major cities of this dialect area include Kansas City, Omaha, St. Louis, Columbus, Ohio, Cincinnati, and Indianapolis.
I AM WAITING
I'm not interested in fighting with you anymore. I simply suggested that if people from Iowa claimed that people from Southern Iowa had light southern accents, then maybe it meant the lines of this map were off a bit. Or, it means that people from the rest of Iowa don't know what a southern accent sounds like. Now that I think about it, the second one might make more sense, but I'm not taking a certain stance on this one. That's all I'm suggesting, and all I'm saying on this matter. Can't we just call a truce and stop this senseless bickering?
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Old 02-15-2013, 10:29 AM
 
2,943 posts, read 9,180,858 times
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I read the article in the link and it stated that people from the north will "hear" the midland accent as "southern" to their ears...which makes perfect sense: it isn't a southern accent, it just comes off that way to people from the north. So, as an outsider, I take this to mean that most of Iowa has a northern accent, perhaps a lighter version of that heard in Minnesota, except for the southern tier, which is more neutral American standard English....even though people within the state would say that is where people speak with a twang or a hint of sutherness. Make any sense? That's what I gather from all the different posts and links. Basically, Iowa is a transition zone from northern sounding accents to a neutral accent in the far south.
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Old 02-16-2013, 10:34 AM
 
Location: USA
7,778 posts, read 10,791,185 times
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The only person I've known from Iowa did have somewhat of an accent, but, the noticeable part of her speech is that she spoke loudly, which, goes along with what my mother always said... people from "up north" talk loud.
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Old 02-18-2013, 11:39 AM
 
9,411 posts, read 10,370,253 times
Reputation: 8537
Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
Being from St. Louis myself, I can tell you that if that guy sounded the way he did, he is a true anomaly to this city of our's. He may not have been born and raised in St. Louis, though, even if he was from there. If he was, he is a true anomaly. St. Louis dialect is neutral saving exactly one type of pronunciation. Here are a few examples of it. Forty="farty" Quarter="Quawrter".

Here is what a linguistic study had to say about the St. Louis accent: Go on the site and click on "Midland" dialects if you can find them. The quote is that "St. Louis is a city located squarely in the South Midland region, but it has a long been a center of Northern linguistic influence." St. Louis is currently undergoing the Northern Cities Shift.

Overall, I'm not discounting your experience at all...simply trying to tell you that you encountered a guy who sounds nothing like the area he is from. The site is listed below.

National Map
He was from St Louis, born and raised. I asked him about his accent and he said he gets that question ALL the time. The numerous tines I have been to StL I have also encountered some with a similar accent. Makes no sense to me! Maybe they are all related? LOL
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Old 02-18-2013, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Sioux Falls, SD area
3,786 posts, read 5,133,334 times
Reputation: 6966
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElleTea View Post
He was from St Louis, born and raised. I asked him about his accent and he said he gets that question ALL the time. The numerous tines I have been to StL I have also encountered some with a similar accent. Makes no sense to me! Maybe they are all related? LOL
No, that would be Arkansas.
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Old 02-19-2013, 05:44 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,461,919 times
Reputation: 1018
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElleTea View Post
He was from St Louis, born and raised. I asked him about his accent and he said he gets that question ALL the time. The numerous tines I have been to StL I have also encountered some with a similar accent. Makes no sense to me! Maybe they are all related? LOL
How is it that you hear all these accents when I'm lucky to hear one once every two weeks? I've lived my whole life in this city and insist that whatever you've heard isn't the norm for this city. And I really hope you're not stereotyping St. Louis as a bunch of inbred, rednecks, because if you are, you have NEVER visited here. And the simple fact he gets that question all the time proves he's an anomaly to the area. Keep in mind that just because you hear an accent doesn't mean the culture and demographics follow suit.

Last edited by stlouisan; 02-19-2013 at 06:01 PM..
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