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Old 11-20-2014, 07:49 PM
 
387 posts, read 541,679 times
Reputation: 471

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Quote:
Originally Posted by one is lonely View Post
I still think it's more interesting than Des Moines.
I'll actually agree with you on that particular point. Des Moines is just a shiny office park with the "Now Hiring" sign stuck in a bunch of windows. The city itself really has no soul, but it has plenty of jobs...with plenty of desperate people to fill them.

The Quad Cities doesn't have much happening in the way of an economic future, but it does have an interesting historical past. It also has a prominent geographical feature running through its midst, so that accounts for something Des Moines will never have. When it comes to interesting history and geography, the Quad Cities is light years ahead of Des Moines.

Unfortunately, most people like to live in places where they can obtain employment and have a secure future. Des Moines wins big over the QC in that category.
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Old 11-21-2014, 07:17 AM
 
231 posts, read 339,709 times
Reputation: 324
Sure, Quad Cities is a blue collar. It's economic outlook is shaky. But I'm really rooting for it and any areas similar to it. I don't think it's necessarily a healthy sign that the only metros really thriving in the Midwest are state capitals, college towns, and one or two megacities.

State capitals and college towns are living off debt, whether it's state and federal debt or student loans. Where's the real economy? Of course, as we've seen in Des Moines and Lansing back in Michigan, financial service companies love locating next to the source of all the red tape, but that's another dubious industry, IMO. I think it's all a big bubble, though probably Des Moines will continue to outperform its peers in Iowa for the foreseeable future.
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Old 11-21-2014, 07:55 PM
 
387 posts, read 541,679 times
Reputation: 471
Quote:
Originally Posted by one is lonely View Post
Sure, Quad Cities is a blue collar. It's economic outlook is shaky. But I'm really rooting for it and any areas similar to it.
Strangers rooting for it on the Internet only gets the QC so far. The area has no real cohesive plan for making its local economy attractive to young professionals. College grads go where the jobs are and where other young people their age are located. This place is a wasteland for jobs and social activity. Local officials keep trying to prop up the Rock Island Arsenal like it's 1953. Sounds like a plan that is destined for failure and disappointment.
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Old 11-26-2014, 08:41 PM
 
427 posts, read 405,067 times
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The Quad Cities is a pretty horrible place to live, especially if you're young. I think it's pretty sad that most residents' livelihood is based on the construction of tractors (John Deere) and guns (Arsenal Island). The truth is no Quad Citian defends the area becau

I lived in Davenport for most of my first 19 years, went to college out of state, and spent most of the past few months in Los Angeles and Salt Lake City. I am back to sleeping on my mothers couch until I get the balls to leave again, and permanently.

Unfortunately there are no opportunities in my industry here, so I really have to leave to be employed or have any sort of career (beyond tractors and guns), but at the same time I still need some time to prepare, hence why I'm on City-Data.

Last edited by Cryinbaby; 11-26-2014 at 08:54 PM..
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Old 11-27-2014, 05:30 AM
 
Location: Jonesboro
3,612 posts, read 3,555,156 times
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What was your field of study, cryin? Where are the hotspots for job opportunities in that industry? What's holding you back from going there?
As for economic development & transformation of the local economy, I do know that there is optimism in the QC about what Alcoa has already done & recently announced for their facility there. Two huge expenditures of nearly half a billion dollars will have put the Davenport Works on the cutting edge of Alcoa's aerospace work. See the 2 links below.
Frankly though, the tractor business took it mightily on the chin during the agricultural disaster of the 80's & has gotten about as lean & concentrated as it can really get with the weak firms that had been hanging on before then all but wiped out.
But many areas of the country would give their eye teeth to have the high paying jobs that can be found at Deere & Co. & it's not a company to be dismissed lightly just because it's based on the agriculture industry.
Given the state of the world, the business of feeding it's people is going to have an incredible future.

Alcoa: News: News Releases: Alcoa to Invest Approximately $300 Million in Davenport, Iowa Plant, Add 150 Jobs as Automotive Demand Rises for Light, Strong, and Recyclable Aluminum

Alcoa to invest $190 million in Davenport Works plant : Business

As for the original topic, I'm looking to see some feedback from the op.
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Old 11-27-2014, 09:45 AM
 
4,757 posts, read 6,431,907 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atler8 View Post
As for the original topic, I'm looking to see some feedback from the op.

Post #10 is probably all you're going to get.
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Old 11-27-2014, 07:47 PM
 
387 posts, read 541,679 times
Reputation: 471
Quote:
Originally Posted by atler8 View Post
As for economic development & transformation of the local economy, I do know that there is optimism in the QC about what Alcoa has already done & recently announced for their facility there. .
I wonder if Alcoa will be able to replace those thousands of jobs that will soon be leaving the Quad Cities as the Arsenal becomes decimated by future BRAC-related cutbacks. Probably not. Tech and financial companies aren't ever looking seriously at the Quad Cities, because the local workforce is only trained to operate industrial machinery. All workers with modern skills have fled the region due to a lack of employment opportunities.

The place is broke and its prospects for future economic development are iffy at best. People vote with their feet, and if you look at the number of young kids fleeing the Quad Cities after graduation, the voting results are unmistakable. Very few wish to live here. Who can blame them?
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Old 11-28-2014, 05:52 AM
 
459 posts, read 342,755 times
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John Deere, Arsenal, Alcoa, Isle of Capri Casinos, and schools are the biggest employeers in the QCA. While the QCA is not having insane population and development growth it is growing, so that's a positive sign I would think. QCA has a decent airport. They are building a new I-74 bridge someday. The signs and makings are there for the area to take off.
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Old 11-28-2014, 06:13 AM
 
Location: Jonesboro
3,612 posts, read 3,555,156 times
Reputation: 4414
Contrary to what has been claimed repeatedly in QC threads, there is cooperation between the cities, counties & across the state line. Just because it is said that there is none, does not make it a fact. There is a realization in the QC biz community that things are best if the boat floats on both sides of the river.
Regional Opportunities Council

And I don't see any evidence that the largest city, Davenport, is "broke" financially either.
Davenport bond rating gets boost

As for the future of The Rock Island Arsenal, who can predict that. A myriad of locations across the U.S. are in fear of losing their bases/arsenals, etc. And when base closures do occcur, often it is not the end of the world for the affected communities.
Generally the communities that are too dependent on the government and or the military budget overall are the ones that are most at risk for future economic malaise in the event of a base closing.
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Old 11-28-2014, 06:55 AM
 
387 posts, read 541,679 times
Reputation: 471
Quote:
Originally Posted by ipkl07 View Post
John Deere, Arsenal, Alcoa, Isle of Capri Casinos, and schools are the biggest employeers in the QCA. -- QCA has a decent airport.
John Deere just laid off hundreds in the Quad Cities. Alcoa is currently in an expansion cycle, but they've routinely laid off hundreds once their inventory reaches a certain level. Neither Deere nor Alcoa employ as many people in the QC today as they did in the 1970s. That's not job growth. At best, it's job stagnation.

Isle of Capri sold off their downtown Davenport facility, meanwhile their Bettendorf facility faces an uncertain future as Jumer's in Rock Island is dominating the market and Kehl takes the Rhythm City property up to I-80 in a few years. IOC may not be able to compete with two modern land-based casinos. Plus, gambling is no longer a robust means of economic development. Just ask Atlantic City how well that industry is working since gambling proliferated on the East Coast.

The Quad City Airport is currently on a big down swing. They've lost many flights and airlines keep putting smaller aircraft on routes that used to have double the current capacity. It reflects in the number of total enplanements, which continues to drop as more airlines cut back service to Moline.

Quote:
Originally Posted by atler8 View Post
And I don't see any evidence that the largest city, Davenport, is "broke" financially either.
Davenport bond rating gets boost
Davenport isn't broke, but the people who live there are. There's a reason why high-end retail stores like Apple and Williams-Sonoma stay out of the Quad Cities, while Dollar Tree and Family Dollar are on every street corner. So many people in the area are living off food stamps and welfare, and those who actually do have jobs are making little more than minimum wage.

The city of Davenport has decent finances, but does nothing constructive with them. City streets are in awful shape and snowplows only clear a fraction of the residential areas during winter. Bettendorf, on the other hand, at least spends money on keeping up their infrastructure.

The Illinois side is completely broke. Rock Island county desperately needs a new court house, but voters keep rejecting the measure because taxes there are already too high and services are inadequate. They're actually worse than Davenport for maintaining roadways. The state of Illinois itself is also flat broke.

Between the functionally-broken local government and the flat-broke local population, the Quad Cities is on a sad trajectory. It just looks and feels like an area that peaked 40 years ago.
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