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Old 04-15-2016, 06:10 AM
 
387 posts, read 549,665 times
Reputation: 473

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Quote:
Originally Posted by capitalcityguy View Post
Many, many more states in the union are more liberal than Iowa.
The person you're responding to isn't capable of appreciating logic.

Senator Joni Ernst and Rep. Steve King represent Iowa in Congress. Those are two of the most conservative politicians you'll find anywhere. If Iowa was such a liberal stronghold (as that one poster claims) there's no way either one of those politicians would be serving in Congress right now.
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Old 04-15-2016, 07:22 AM
 
Location: Sioux Falls, SD area
3,790 posts, read 5,133,334 times
Reputation: 6977
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dewey59 View Post
LOL!!!!! Yes, Iowa City is very liberal.... but no where near as liberal as San Francisco! Have you lived in both areas? I have. If you have not, it would explain this ridiculous statement. As for Cedar Rapids, NOT EVEN CLOSE!!!! It leans slightly conservative if anything. Yes, there are some liberal pockets, but overall, it is a family community with more traditional leanings.

I have 3 children. 2 of which lived in Iowa City for many years. They weren't students, but were employed in education and healthcare. Iowa City is crazy liberal and both worked with these people. I stand by my assertion that it rivals San Francisco. Heck, when my daughter bought her house there and needed help moving from the duplex she lived in she couldn't find a single GUY friend who even owned a pickup. If she was in need of someone owning a Prius with a "I love my Co-op" bumper sticker on it she would have had it made.


I should not have included Cedar Rapids as being a bastion of liberalism as it is a different city than Iowa City. I'll admit that I'm not in tune with this city's political mix. Located as it is not far from either the Quad Cities or Iowa City I'm very surprised that you say it leans slightly conservative.


My son drove an Avalanche so you know how he fit in. He loved going to Hawkeye games, but other than that was very happy moving away. His values did not fit the craziness that was Iowa City.
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Old 04-15-2016, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa
1,670 posts, read 2,397,194 times
Reputation: 2951
I work in Iowa City and have one child who went to Iowa. I also went to college many years ago in the Bay area and spent a lot of time as a kid and young adult with relatives who lived in downtown San Francisco. While Iowa City may be liberal it doesn't come close to San Francisco at all.

Last edited by smpliving; 04-15-2016 at 08:41 AM..
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Old 04-15-2016, 09:20 AM
 
Location: Jonesboro
3,637 posts, read 3,615,180 times
Reputation: 4511
As for the political "craziness" in Iowa City as it was called here earlier, folks on the Democratic to progressive to liberal end of the political spectrum have long viewed Sioux County, i.e. Sioux Center, Orange City, Rock Valley, Hull & Hawarden as the epicenter of right wing "craziness" in Iowa.
The Republicans, the joke has been, could run a deceased person for president & the voters of Sioux County would opt to vote for him versus voting for a Democrat.
Sioux City in Woodbury County is not to be confused with Sioux County, by the way. Sioux City may typically elect more Republicans than Democrats to represent it in the state legislature but in terms of presidential election vote, it usually is quite balanced & can tilt slightly into the D column or slightly into the R column for president.
Council Bluffs, which is the only other western Iowa city to be part of a metro area, is also similarly balanced in it's voting history.
Both cities are not full of "liberal" Democrats but rather Democrats who are associated with the labor movement or the progressive movement. Much of Iowa is populated by these type of Democrats who are not necessarily considered to be "liberals".
Think in terms of what you find in the typical Democratic voters in Des Moines, Cedar Rapids, Dubuque, Davenport, Waterloo-Cedar Falls & Ames & smaller cities such as Fort Dodge, Mason City, Ottumwa, Burlington & Clinton and you have the same assortment of labor & progressive Democrats.
As Iowa has urbanized over the recent decades, it's rural population dominance has been overturned and the state became a part of the upper Midwest cluster of 3 states, i.e. Minnesota & Wisconsin that typically were considered to be "progressive" in their voting patterns & not necessarily purely "liberal".
As part of a developing purple voting pattern in Iowa, it was not until Iowa re-elected Tom Harkin to the U.S. Senate in 1990 that Iowa had ever re-elected a Democrat to the U.S. Senate. Going back to it's founding as a state in 1846, that was a past history of absolute Republican dominance; a dominance that was drawing down in it's absolutism as I was a young person Iowa.

Last edited by atler8; 04-15-2016 at 09:24 AM.. Reason: edited sentence construction
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Old 04-15-2016, 12:35 PM
 
6,147 posts, read 5,764,962 times
Reputation: 18876
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmgg View Post
Heck, when my daughter bought her house there and needed help moving from the duplex she lived in she couldn't find a single GUY friend who even owned a pickup. If she was in need of someone owning a Prius with a "I love my Co-op" bumper sticker on it she would have had it made.
Woops, guess "liberals" can't drive pickup trucks and "conservatives" can't shop at a food co-op.

That There's some of that socioculturalness to which some of the posters above have been referring.
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Old 04-15-2016, 01:05 PM
 
Location: Sioux Falls, SD area
3,790 posts, read 5,133,334 times
Reputation: 6977
Quote:
Originally Posted by 601halfdozen0theother View Post
Woops, guess "liberals" can't drive pickup trucks and "conservatives" can't shop at a food co-op.

That There's some of that socioculturalness to which some of the posters above have been referring.

As you know, all stereotypes have originated with a degree of truth. Many times these stereotypes become greatly exaggerated over time.


I made a point with a degree of humor and with a stereotype, but you WILL find if around Iowa City at all, that those driving pickups or any vehicle with a motor more powerful than a lawnmower are worried about what their liberal friends will think about them.
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Old 04-15-2016, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Sioux Falls, SD area
3,790 posts, read 5,133,334 times
Reputation: 6977
Quote:
Originally Posted by atler8 View Post
As for the political "craziness" in Iowa City as it was called here earlier, folks on the Democratic to progressive to liberal end of the political spectrum have long viewed Sioux County, i.e. Sioux Center, Orange City, Rock Valley, Hull & Hawarden as the epicenter of right wing "craziness" in Iowa.
The Republicans, the joke has been, could run a deceased person for president & the voters of Sioux County would opt to vote for him versus voting for a Democrat.
Sioux City in Woodbury County is not to be confused with Sioux County, by the way. Sioux City may typically elect more Republicans than Democrats to represent it in the state legislature but in terms of presidential election vote, it usually is quite balanced & can tilt slightly into the D column or slightly into the R column for president.
Council Bluffs, which is the only other western Iowa city to be part of a metro area, is also similarly balanced in it's voting history.
Both cities are not full of "liberal" Democrats but rather Democrats who are associated with the labor movement or the progressive movement. Much of Iowa is populated by these type of Democrats who are not necessarily considered to be "liberals".
Think in terms of what you find in the typical Democratic voters in Des Moines, Cedar Rapids, Dubuque, Davenport, Waterloo-Cedar Falls & Ames & smaller cities such as Fort Dodge, Mason City, Ottumwa, Burlington & Clinton and you have the same assortment of labor & progressive Democrats.
As Iowa has urbanized over the recent decades, it's rural population dominance has been overturned and the state became a part of the upper Midwest cluster of 3 states, i.e. Minnesota & Wisconsin that typically were considered to be "progressive" in their voting patterns & not necessarily purely "liberal".
As part of a developing purple voting pattern in Iowa, it was not until Iowa re-elected Tom Harkin to the U.S. Senate in 1990 that Iowa had ever re-elected a Democrat to the U.S. Senate. Going back to it's founding as a state in 1846, that was a past history of absolute Republican dominance; a dominance that was drawing down in it's absolutism as I was a young person Iowa.

Now that's a stereotype too. It ain't no joke though when it comes to Sioux County. It would be the case. Sioux County is Iowa City for conservatives.
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Old 04-22-2016, 12:47 PM
 
Location: North Dakota
8,410 posts, read 10,121,255 times
Reputation: 12789
Quote:
Originally Posted by goolsbyjazz View Post
Ok, I know the title comes off somewhat sarcastic, but that is not the intent at all. I have some friends who recently relocated to Iowa and they RAVE about how much they love it and how much better life is there. I realize it's somewhat subjective, but they have been sending me beautiful pictures of their family having tons of fun.

Here is the kicker; they are pushing hard for me and my family to move there as well. I gave no indication I was even remotely interested in living there (no offense to Iowans, it was just never on my radar). I am not interested in moving there, but am interested in visiting to see what all the fuss is about. They live in a place called LaPorte, I believe.

My question is this: when I do visit which city should I make sure to spend time in the get a feel for Iowa? Not for relocation, just as a tourist. Des Moines? Iowa City?
Most of my extended family is there. They can't go more than three sentences without saying the name of the state. If I lived there I would probably choose Des Moines, Cedar Rapids, or Iowa City. They all seem like nice cities. I've heard that northeast Iowa is pretty. In general though, I'm pretty indifferent to the state.
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Old 04-29-2016, 09:20 PM
 
Location: Northern United States
217 posts, read 184,101 times
Reputation: 301
This is one of the worst forums I have ever seen. The amount of trolls is horrible. I have not seen anything nearly this bad anywhere on the city data forums. Though, much of this is personal opinion.
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Old 04-30-2016, 11:09 AM
 
215 posts, read 204,742 times
Reputation: 468
There was an article in the Omaha World Herald a couple years ago about a tourist from France who died after jumping off a moving Amtrak train. My comment at the time was "I live in Iowa. Sometimes I feel like jumping off a train." Nothing's changed. Look up 'Mundane'.
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