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Old 05-31-2017, 06:32 PM
 
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I noticed when you go deeper into the Midwest, like in Iowa, you see almost no trees. You see acres and acres of farmland. I was told they want to squeeze every last inch out of it for growing crops. Here in Ohio, there are a ton of trees on farms, usually on the perimeter between farms.

Why is this? Does this serve a farming purpose of some kind particular to Ohio?
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Old 05-31-2017, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Des Moines Metro
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PerryMason614 View Post
Why is this? Does this serve a farming purpose of some kind particular to Ohio?
Emergency bathroom?

Added: Southern Ohio gets fairly warm in the summer. I used to see Amishmen and their teams resting under the lone oak tree in the middle of their field in the early afternoon.

Last edited by Meemur; 05-31-2017 at 09:26 PM..
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Old 05-31-2017, 08:24 PM
 
Location: IN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PerryMason614 View Post
I noticed when you go deeper into the Midwest, like in Iowa, you see almost no trees. You see acres and acres of farmland. I was told they want to squeeze every last inch out of it for growing crops. Here in Ohio, there are a ton of trees on farms, usually on the perimeter between farms.

Why is this? Does this serve a farming purpose of some kind particular to Ohio?
For the most part, areas closer to the prairie regions edging out onto the Great Plains have tree rows and windbreaks planted closer to housing structures or out buildings like barns. I have seen trees separating crop fields with major roads. Farmers could certainly plant more trees as it helps quite a bit with wind erosion around crop lands edges. Ohio is also further east and within close proximity to temperate forested areas, included within the humid continental climate zones. Areas south and east of Columbus, OH mark the entry into the western edge of the Appalachian region with hilly topography and more tree cover.
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Old 05-31-2017, 09:22 PM
 
Location: Sioux Falls, SD area
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This is one strange observation to me. As I've traveled Iowa over the last 10 years what has stood out to me was WITH THE EXCEPTION of the northern 1/3 of the state 2/3rds the way across until you get to the Mississippi River bluffs, the farm fields are broken up everywhere from the rolling hills and multiple tree stands. Yea, lots of corn, but very small fields. This is in stark contrast to southern Minnesota, NE Nebraska, and eastern South Dakota where I'm from.


I always thought, prior to the last decade where I've traveled Iowa extensively, that the whole state of Iowa was more like NW Iowa that I was so accustomed to with it's mile roads and farms divided out by sections.


I've never been to Ohio (been in states all around it) so if Iowa to the OP is considered wide open fields, you've REALLY got small farm fields there.
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Old 06-02-2017, 12:17 AM
 
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Maybe it's because I was in Iowa during the winter time.

I asked the same question on the Ohio board and someone said the difference is that Ohio was heavily forested and Iowa was largely prairie.

Here's a spot along I-71 south of Columbus that shows what I'm talking about?

https://goo.gl/maps/hcy9RWfTjhs

If you want to see the responses in Ohio:

//www.city-data.com/forum/colum...any-trees.html
//www.city-data.com/forum/ohio/...rees-ohio.html
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Old 06-02-2017, 07:41 AM
 
Location: Des Moines Metro
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It's an interesting question: I've lived in both states and never really thought about it.

That's true about Ohio having more forest, and NW OH was part of the Great Swamp. I'm still learning Iowa geology and geography, but it's definitely prairie: I've had lots of new plants and shrubs to learn.
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Old 06-02-2017, 08:11 AM
 
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Interesting discussion. When I moved to eastern Iowa, I was impressed by all the patches of woods and hills around what I considered smaller farms. I grew up in California, but visited my relatives as a kid in eastern South Dakota who have farmed there for over 100 years. I was use to large expansive areas of farmland with no trees except for windbreakers around farm house/structures in South Dakota. I have no experience with Ohio, so can't compare but the picture shown in this thread looks similar to what is found in eastern Iowa IMO.

I've heard somewhere that huge areas of wooded land were cut down in Iowa (eastern?) many years ago for farming.

Last edited by smpliving; 06-02-2017 at 08:27 AM..
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Old 06-02-2017, 09:40 AM
 
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There never were extensive forests in the native prairie areas, period. Ohio was always hilly forest, the Great Plains prairie grassland. Big bluestem was the tallest thing out here. Other than river areas, grass ruled. I know an Iowan who moved to Kearny, NE and was surprised by the lack of trees there.
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Old 06-02-2017, 10:08 AM
 
Location: Des Moines, Iowa
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The soil in Iowa is not only some of the best in North America, it is some of the best in the world so not too surprising that almost every acre available is farmed.
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Old 06-02-2017, 04:25 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by capitalcityguy View Post
The soil in Iowa is not only some of the best in North America, it is some of the best in the world so not too surprising that almost every acre available is farmed.
Ohio has plenty of what the USDA calls "Prime Farmland". Once you get to the western half of Ohio north of US 35, it looks like any other part of the Midwest. (Except for the trees, that is.)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prime_...d_USA_1997.png
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