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Old 12-04-2019, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Keosauqua, Iowa
9,243 posts, read 17,632,709 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CrownVic95 View Post
I'm kicking around the idea of a move to Iowa in the foreseeable future, so now I'm curious as to the typical water source in small town Iowa. I see myself in a town perhaps somewhere between Decorah and Mason City in size. I'm assuming private wells are only in the outlying/farm areas? Do pretty much all the decent size towns have some kind of controlled and tested city water?
All of them do, even the small towns. Iowa is well covered by various rural water districts, towns that are too small to are served by rural water. Heck, even most of the Amish have rural water, at least in my area.

Frankly, I'm surprised that the OP has apparently found multiple properties for sale that aren't served by rural water.
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Old 12-04-2019, 03:33 PM
 
Location: A safe distance from San Francisco
9,793 posts, read 6,848,742 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by duster1979 View Post
All of them do, even the small towns. Iowa is well covered by various rural water districts, towns that are too small to are served by rural water. Heck, even most of the Amish have rural water, at least in my area.

Frankly, I'm surprised that the OP has apparently found multiple properties for sale that aren't served by rural water.
Thank you, but could you please clarify what is meant by rural water?
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Old 12-04-2019, 04:29 PM
 
502 posts, read 145,624 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CrownVic95 View Post
Thank you, but could you please clarify what is meant by rural water?
I live in South Dakota so we are all close.

Rural water is treated water just like big city water but is piped to rural areas, so it is called rural water. The rural water we are hooked to just outside of town is actually better than the town(i live in) water. Our rural water comes from the Missouri river.
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Old 12-04-2019, 05:03 PM
 
Location: Sioux Falls, SD area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sam812 View Post
I live in South Dakota so we are all close.

Rural water is treated water just like big city water but is piped to rural areas, so it is called rural water. The rural water we are hooked to just outside of town is actually better than the town(i live in) water. Our rural water comes from the Missouri river.
I think I'll clarify your statement. My guess is that your rural water, assuming it's the Lewis & Clark pipeline, comes from the Missouri River aquifer. Not straight from the Missouri River. However, many towns that are close to the river actually do use intakes straight from the Missouri River, but then the water has to go to a water treatment plant prior to usage by homeowners.

The "rural" water we get from the Lewis & Clark pipeline is great (I'm in SD too).
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Old 12-04-2019, 05:29 PM
 
6,056 posts, read 5,652,811 times
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Here's a practical thing about wells: well pumps are noisy. If your well pump is in the basement of a house you want to buy, make sure the bedroom you or your kids will be using isn't located right above the well pump. Mine kicks on and off at night and wakes me up.
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Old 12-04-2019, 07:17 PM
 
Location: Sioux Falls, SD area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 601halfdozen0theother View Post
Here's a practical thing about wells: well pumps are noisy. If your well pump is in the basement of a house you want to buy, make sure the bedroom you or your kids will be using isn't located right above the well pump. Mine kicks on and off at night and wakes me up.
That was good advice. May I add one other little thing to add if you have a well pump. Most likely you're living in the country and may have other outside water hydrants. My folks added a small red light in the kitchen that was connected to the pump. Whenever the well pump kicked in, the light would come on and would only go off when the pump stopped. If you had a leak in the water system the pump would continue to run and you may not catch it for days. If the light never goes off, you either have a leak in the system or someone forgot to shut off a hydrant somewhere on the yard.

This is especially important if you have the well pump in the well and not in your basement.
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Old 12-05-2019, 08:25 AM
 
Location: Keosauqua, Iowa
9,243 posts, read 17,632,709 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CrownVic95 View Post
Thank you, but could you please clarify what is meant by rural water?
Quote:
Originally Posted by sam812 View Post
Rural water is treated water just like big city water but is piped to rural areas, so it is called rural water. The rural water we are hooked to just outside of town is actually better than the town(i live in) water. Our rural water comes from the Missouri river.
Yes, it's a municipal water system that serves rural customers and small towns in a large area rather than one specific community. I think there are five or six rural water districts in Iowa that cover the state pretty well. Sorry for the confusion, "rural water" is a generic term that those of us who have it or deal with it use frequently that doesn't necessarily mean anything to those in the outside world.

Communities the size of those you seem to be looking at will have their own water treatment systems, but even if you end up outside the city limits or in a small outlying town you should have access to a public water system.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 601halfdozen0theother View Post
Here's a practical thing about wells: well pumps are noisy. If your well pump is in the basement of a house you want to buy, make sure the bedroom you or your kids will be using isn't located right above the well pump. Mine kicks on and off at night and wakes me up.
If your pump is running at night when nobody is using water you really need to find the leak that's causing it to run. Or if it's a situation where the pump runs every time someone flushes the toilet or gets a glass of water you might want to consider a larger pressure tank so the pump doesn't run so frequently. You can get a pretty good sized tank for under $300 which is a pretty cheap investment for a good night's sleep.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmgg View Post
That was good advice. May I add one other little thing to add if you have a well pump. Most likely you're living in the country and may have other outside water hydrants. My folks added a small red light in the kitchen that was connected to the pump. Whenever the well pump kicked in, the light would come on and would only go off when the pump stopped. If you had a leak in the water system the pump would continue to run and you may not catch it for days. If the light never goes off, you either have a leak in the system or someone forgot to shut off a hydrant somewhere on the yard.

This is especially important if you have the well pump in the well and not in your basement.
A waterlogged tank was something we dealt with pretty regularly in the house where I grew up. Well systems use compressed air to create water pressure so the pump doesn't have to run every time you use the water. Over time the tank would fill completely up with water, leaving no room for air. To test it you'd push a Schrader valve (like a tire valve) on top of the tank; if air hissed out it was fine, if water bubbled out the tank was waterlogged. To fix it you'd shut down the system, drain the tank, then start it back up. I don't know that this is a problem with modern systems, though.

We'd also have to prime the pump every once in awhile, when I hear "Desert Pete" by Peter, Paul, and Mary I think of that.

Last edited by duster1979; 12-05-2019 at 08:51 AM..
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Old 12-05-2019, 08:41 AM
 
Location: A safe distance from San Francisco
9,793 posts, read 6,848,742 times
Reputation: 10412
Quote:
Originally Posted by sam812 View Post
I live in South Dakota so we are all close.

Rural water is treated water just like big city water but is piped to rural areas, so it is called rural water. The rural water we are hooked to just outside of town is actually better than the town(i live in) water. Our rural water comes from the Missouri river.
Quote:
Originally Posted by duster1979 View Post
Yes, it's a municipal water system that serves rural customers and small towns in a large area rather than one specific community. I think there are five or six rural water districts in Iowa that cover the state pretty well. Sorry for the confusion, "rural water" is a generic term that those of us who have it or deal with it use frequently that doesn't necessarily mean anything to those in the outside world.

Communities the size of those you seem to be looking at will have their own water treatment systems, but even if you end up outside the city limits or in a small outlying town you should have access to a public water system.



If your pump is running at night when nobody is using water you really need to find the leak that's causing it to run. Or if it's a situation where the pump runs every time someone flushes the toilet or gets a glass of water you might want to consider a larger pressure tank so the pump doesn't run so frequently. You can get a pretty good sized tank for under $300 which is a pretty cheap investment for a good night's sleep.



A waterlogged tank was something we dealt with pretty regularly in the house where I grew up. Well systems use compressed air to create water pressure so the pump doesn't have to run every time you use the water. Over time the tank would fill completely up with water, leaving no room for air.
Thank you both. That's pretty much what I figured, but appreciate the confirmation.
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