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Old 11-30-2019, 07:23 PM
 
Location: In a secret bunker under the Cannery
1,046 posts, read 857,488 times
Reputation: 708

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looking at moving to Iowa and finding some interesting properties that have well water.

Wondering what the locals think of that option and what concerns you would have about it.

Thanks
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Old 12-01-2019, 12:21 PM
 
Location: on the wind
10,658 posts, read 4,839,826 times
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Wells are individual. One property could have a perfectly decent, productive well and the one right next door might not. If you find a property you like that has a well, inspect to see what if any water treatments the current owners do (softener, filters, iron removal, UV sterilization, etc) and make sure you can get the results of a current water test. Or, arrange to have it tested (test it yourself for taste too).
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Old 12-02-2019, 09:10 PM
 
134 posts, read 191,753 times
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I agree with Parnassia, I grew up on well water, the well couldn't have been more than 30-40 foot deep as we were 150 ft from the Raccoon River. I drank straight out of the hydrant everyday, tasted fine to me but bottled water wasn't a thing when I was growing up. Between drinking well water and swimming in the river almost daily growing up, with who knows what floating by, my immune system is top notch nowadays!!

Aaron
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Old 12-03-2019, 07:52 AM
 
502 posts, read 145,624 times
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Like the others said just have it tested. If taking the sample yourself make sure to follow the directions on how to do it. The only real draw back of well water is you have to change or remove(cancels warranty) the rod in your water heater or your hot water will smell like rotten eggs.

Last edited by sam812; 12-03-2019 at 08:03 AM..
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Old 12-03-2019, 02:07 PM
 
215 posts, read 197,942 times
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Nitrates are a big issue in IA wells. Even after testing, I wouldn't have kids drinking it, brain damage and all. Could explain Steve King's popularity.
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Old 12-03-2019, 08:46 PM
 
Location: Sioux Falls, SD area
3,616 posts, read 5,014,683 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ION1010 View Post
Nitrates are a big issue in IA wells. Even after testing, I wouldn't have kids drinking it, brain damage and all. Could explain Steve King's popularity.
Are you a farm person, or just someone who spits out some narratives from liberal websites.

Well water quality ranges from well to well.

First thing is DON'T dig a well downhill or downstream from a feed lot or heavily occupied pasture. Pure common sense. It's probably not a good idea to locate a well anywhere below the grade of all the existing farm land. This helps eliminate contamination issues even though if you did, your water may still be very good.

Water well DEPTH can range from 40' all the way to 400+ feet. Quality can be different from section to section.

I grew up on a farm with a 90' well. Still the best tasting water I've ever tasted. Back almost 50 years ago some "expert" tested our well and stated that nothing would live very long with this water.

My mother lived on our farm for over 70 years to the age of 94. We had a horse that lived nearly 40 years. My mother's calico cat lived to 28 DOCUMENTED years making this cat one of the oldest cats in the United States at that time (I researched it). The old duffer that homesteaded our farm lived into his 90's.

So much for the "experts".
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Old 12-03-2019, 09:27 PM
 
Location: Pueblo West, CO
320 posts, read 300,634 times
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I found it way more annoying than city water.... it ends up costing more money and it also takes up time...... Of course, it did taste and feel better as I could control how much I softened it........

If the power goes out, your pump cannot pump......... If the pump dies, you have no water until you get it fixed...... etc etc etc
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Old 12-04-2019, 06:56 AM
 
6,456 posts, read 2,757,739 times
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when I was a kid in the 50's our well was 15-20feet...………..not really a "well" father just had to drive a "sand point" in a few feet...………...best water I ever drank. We lived on a farm the government had drilled down 200 feet to test the soil. It was sand all the way...………..best filtration you can have....not so good for corn or soybeans however.
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Old 12-04-2019, 08:32 AM
 
Location: Keosauqua, Iowa
9,243 posts, read 17,632,709 times
Reputation: 12570
Quote:
Originally Posted by ION1010 View Post
Nitrates are a big issue in IA wells. Even after testing, I wouldn't have kids drinking it, brain damage and all. Could explain Steve King's popularity.
Not true. Nitrates are a problem with surface water systems due to runoff from fields. Unless you have a dug well located downhill from a field or an open hog lot you're not going to have elevated nitrate levels in your well water.

The biggest problem with wells in Iowa, at least my part of the state, is inconsistent groundwater levels. The development of the regional rural water system was a Godsend to farmers in this area as well as many small towns. Most wells have hard water which can be handled with a water softener. A sulfur taste and smell isn't uncommon, it can be dealt with through aeration or a carbon filter. High levels of bacteria are fairly rare and are usually the result of a mouse or something falling in the well and dying. It can easily be treated with tablets or even by pouring Clorox in the well, but you can also install a chlorine treatment system if you don't want to mess with testing it.
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Old 12-04-2019, 02:30 PM
 
Location: A safe distance from San Francisco
9,793 posts, read 6,848,742 times
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I noticed this thread and it reminded me of having well water in Minnesota in the 1950s. And that water was not safe to drink due to the homes being originally constructed with cesspools. Primitive times that I shake my head remembering, but that's the way it was even in some suburban Minneapolis areas prior to the early 60s.

I'm kicking around the idea of a move to Iowa in the foreseeable future, so now I'm curious as to the typical water source in small town Iowa. I see myself in a town perhaps somewhere between Decorah and Mason City in size. I'm assuming private wells are only in the outlying/farm areas? Do pretty much all the decent size towns have some kind of controlled and tested city water?
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