U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Iowa
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-11-2008, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Chariton, Iowa
681 posts, read 2,849,551 times
Reputation: 451

Advertisements

According to the new 2007 US Census population estimates, the top ten fastest growing cities in Iowa (by % growth) are:
  1. Waukee (Des Moines suburb)
  2. North Liberty (Iowa City/Cedar Rapids suburb)
  3. Granger (Des Moines suburb)
  4. Fairfax (Cedar Rapids suburb)
  5. Johnston (Des Moines suburb)
  6. Peosta (Dubuque suburb)
  7. Tiffin (Iowa City suburb)
  8. Palo (Cedar Rapids suburb)
  9. Atkins (Cedar Rapids suburb)
  10. Asbury (Dubuque suburb)

Some other facts from these latest numbers:
  • 62% of Iowans now live in a metropolitan county.
  • 19% of Iowans live in a county adjacent to a metro area.
  • Between 2000 and 2007, approx. 75% of the state's 947 cities lost population
  • Iowa as a whole grew by 0.5% in 2007, and by approx 2% since 2000.

So I thought I'd throw this up for discussion. What do these demographic shifts mean for our state? Where are we headed? Is the Iowa small town dead?

Source article: Latest census figures: More Iowans like suburban life | DesMoinesRegister.com | The Des Moines Register
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-11-2008, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Iowa City/Dubuque, IA
100 posts, read 503,776 times
Reputation: 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by SharpHawkeye View Post
So I thought I'd throw this up for discussion. What do these demographic shifts mean for our state? Where are we headed? Is the Iowa small town dead?
Small Iowa towns aren't dead, although it will become increasingly difficult for them to compete with the growing political and economic might that the cities will have.

I see it this way... small and mid-sized towns that are within a reasonable commuting distance of the larger cities (<30 mi) will remain relatively strong, and will likely get some spillover from their growth. The towns farther away will not fare as well, since they are more removed from the services and businesses that people require.

Geographically speaking... this means that most areas of East-Central Iowa will remain relatively stable or prosperous (since 5 of the state's 10 largest cities are in the east, and are within 100 mi of each other). More rural areas in North Iowa, Western Iowa, and along the Missouri border will continue to shrink, as they have been doing...

We are headed toward a state with the vast majority of its people living in the east, in and around Des Moines, and along the Missouri River.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-11-2008, 06:37 PM
 
196 posts, read 730,371 times
Reputation: 94
This gives you a good look at each metro. This is 2000-2007 growth (or decline). Thanks to icejammer on eomahaforums.com.

Des Moines-West Des Moines, IA 546,599 481,394 13.5%
Iowa City, IA 147,038 131,676 11.7%
Omaha-Council Bluffs, NE-IA 829,890 767,041 8.2%
Cedar Rapids, IA 252,784 237,230 6.6%
Ames, IA 84,752 79,981 6.0%
Dubuque, IA 92,359 89,143 3.6%
Pella, IA 32,775 32,052 2.3%
Spirit Lake, IA 16,696 16,424 1.7%
Boone, IA 26,391 26,224 0.6%
Muscatine, IA 54,218 53,905 0.6%
Davenport-Moline-Rock Island, IA-IL 376,160 376,019 0.0%
Marshalltown, IA 39,316 39,311 0.0%
Sioux City, IA-NE-SD 142,794 143,053 -0.2%
Waterloo-Cedar Falls, IA 163,329 163,706 -0.2%
Oskaloosa, IA 22,280 22,335 -0.2%
Newton, IA 36,748 37,213 -1.2%
Ottumwa, IA 35,551 36,051 -1.4%
Clinton, IA 49,051 50,149 -2.2%
Storm Lake, IA 19,776 20,411 -3.1%
Spencer, IA 16,689 17,372 -3.9%
Fort Dodge, IA 38,587 40,235 -4.1%
Burlington, IA-IL 48,288 50,564 -4.5%
Mason City, IA 51,701 54,356 -4.9%
Fort Madison-Keokuk, IA-MO 42,839 45,468 -5.8%
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-12-2008, 05:08 PM
 
204 posts, read 949,703 times
Reputation: 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by DSMGuy View Post
Davenport-Moline-Rock Island, IA-IL 376,160 376,019 0.0%
Maybe the Quad Cities can hit 376,500 by the year 2030!!!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-12-2008, 06:04 PM
 
Location: Davenport, Iowa
413 posts, read 1,597,047 times
Reputation: 522
Well, for the first 3 or 4 years of that timeframe Davenport and much of the IL side were losing population. At this point I think we're going back up again, but it averages out over the 7 years right now. I think we're in good shape for some decent gains by the 2010 census.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-12-2008, 06:38 PM
 
204 posts, read 949,703 times
Reputation: 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by QuadCityImages View Post
Well, for the first 3 or 4 years of that timeframe Davenport and much of the IL side were losing population. At this point I think we're going back up again, but it averages out over the 7 years right now. I think we're in good shape for some decent gains by the 2010 census.
I guess I haven't really seen any dramatic change in the picture between 2000-04 and 04-present to see where those population gains would come from. This statistic highlights the failure of local civic leaders to effectively market the QC area to outside concerns. We have more interstate highways than Des Moines, Omaha, or Cedar Rapids, a more population-dense surrounding than those metros, and direct access to the nation's busiest inland waterway.

Based on those facts alone, the area should be seeing significantly more growth than 0.0003% over the span of seven years.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-13-2008, 07:38 PM
 
Location: Chariton, Iowa
681 posts, read 2,849,551 times
Reputation: 451
I agree, it would seem that something is amiss there. My only thought would be that the Quad Cities got hit a lot harder than other Iowa cities with the double whammy of the farm crisis and general rust belt decline back in the 80's/90's.

It does sound like that might be changing though, with some of the projects and civic improvements going on in that area.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-14-2008, 07:27 PM
 
204 posts, read 949,703 times
Reputation: 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by SharpHawkeye View Post
It does sound like that might be changing though, with some of the projects and civic improvements going on in that area.
There has already been a great deal of civic improvements over the last 20 years in the Quad City area. One could cite a long list of ambitious projects (The Mark, The Figge, John Deere Commons, and other large-scale downtown revitalizations) that have been completed, yet solid economic development seems elusive to the area still.

Again, I think this is a failure of local civic organizations to effectively market the area. There is no real plan to attract new business into the area, but merely to maintain what has been established. That seems to explain why the QC growth rate has been slow over the last decade.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-14-2008, 10:43 PM
 
Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa
74 posts, read 227,504 times
Reputation: 34
There are small towns out in the middle of nowhere that don't really serve any function now as they once did back in the early 1900s when farms were smaller, and people depended more on a local marketplace.

However, large urban growth is hardly good thing for Iowa.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-15-2008, 07:40 AM
 
204 posts, read 949,703 times
Reputation: 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roy G. Biv View Post
However, large urban growth is hardly good thing for Iowa.
It's great the for the urban areas that acquire growth, however, it is being done mostly on the backs of rural Iowa towns. Much of the growth in Des Moines and Cedar Rapids seems to be spurred on by high school grads from small-town Iowa. A large percentage of my classmates ended up settling in or around the Des Moines area after graduation. While this is great news for Des Moines, it is terrible news for the small farm towns that once defined Iowa's rural landscape.

Even more sad is the fact this trend shows no signs of reversing itself.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Iowa

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top