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Old 06-28-2009, 11:25 PM
 
Location: Wyoming
9,728 posts, read 18,846,695 times
Reputation: 14694

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Quote:
Originally Posted by elfyum View Post
You ain't never been to SOFL!
You want flat?
We FLAT!!!
When people think of flat states they think KS, IA...
There are HILLS there!
There are NONE here!
FL - The Flat State.
You've got that right! I can remember driving through Florida on I-5 and thinking if a 3-foot tsunami hit the coast it would flood the entire state, save for a few bridges that cross roads.
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Old 02-22-2020, 02:27 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma
11,767 posts, read 8,396,996 times
Reputation: 10597
Anybody who thinks Iowa is "flat" just hasn't done RAGBRAI yet.
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Old 02-23-2020, 09:07 AM
 
Location: Sioux Falls, SD area
3,894 posts, read 5,288,716 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eddie gein View Post
Anybody who thinks Iowa is "flat" just hasn't done RAGBRAI yet.
The only area in Iowa approaching flat is the NW corner east of the Loess Hills and the top 1/3 of the state from west to the center. That area IS rolling hills. The rest of the state has very RAGBRAI energy sucking hills. Tons of cornfields across the state, but because of the many hills in the areas outside of what I listed, the fields are relatively small.

Go to South Dakota and Nebraska to see big fields not encumbered by steep hills.
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Old 02-25-2020, 07:19 PM
 
215 posts, read 211,974 times
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So, Pike's peak (Iowa) was supposed to be the highest point Zebulon Pike figured he'd see on his way to the Pacific. It's an impressive overlook.



That driftless area is more karst and cliffs than rolling hils but it's damned pretty.
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Old 02-28-2020, 07:57 AM
 
859 posts, read 342,365 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmgg View Post
The only area in Iowa approaching flat is the NW corner east of the Loess Hills and the top 1/3 of the state from west to the center. That area IS rolling hills. The rest of the state has very RAGBRAI energy sucking hills. Tons of cornfields across the state, but because of the many hills in the areas outside of what I listed, the fields are relatively small.

Go to South Dakota and Nebraska to see big fields not encumbered by steep hills.
Basically everything north of Highway 3 and west of Highway 63 is flat as hell. Then the flatness runs south in the central third of the state to Des Moines. Everything else is hilly to some extent.

The Driftless Area (from Clinton to Minnesota and the first 40-50 miles west of the river) is rugged and dramatic. More so than anywhere else in the state, including the Loess Hills, which are also beautiful but a more gentle kind of topography. You don't have the sheer cliffs, canyons, and exposed rock walls of the Driftless.
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Old 03-04-2020, 10:37 PM
 
1,664 posts, read 2,636,199 times
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Kossuth County in northern Iowa is an interesting story. It used to actually be two counties; Kossuth in the south, and Bancroft in the north, both formed in 1851. The area is very flat, one of the flattest areas in the state due to glacial activity thousands of years ago that left the entire area poorly drained and marshy. It was terrible for farming. Even though a county had been established, very few people lived in Bancroft County and it eventually ended up getting disbanded and absorbed back into Kossuth County in 1857, where more of the local population resided and where there was more political pull. Today, the only reminder that this was once a county is a small town named Bancroft.
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