U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Florida > Jacksonville
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-27-2018, 08:02 PM
 
193 posts, read 150,839 times
Reputation: 74

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by kmarc View Post
Don't overthink it. The problems of your current employer should have nothing to do with you moving on. Stick to your original plan. Doesn't hurt to ask HR at the steel mill for an update. But don't stop there, keep pushing ahead with other applications.
Well you see that's the problem, because you see what is going on with employer 1, effects employer 2. Here's what I mean by that:

This steel mill that potentially is going to hire me full-time for their company, I do security at on Saturday nights and on Sunday Nights on the midnight shift and I am sub-contracted to do that through my current security company. They have their own in-house security Monday through Friday but they contract my company to do the security on the weekends.


My position there is important because there is a lot of wood, steel, and welding at this company and sometimes fires happen. Now if a fire happens it almost always happens on the dayshift. However, at night sometimes, the power goes out, and plus they have a very faulty alarm system. Constantly on my job there are a lot of false flag alarms. At that point, I have to go shut off the fire alarm, by hand and that sounds like it would be easy but it's actually quite the complicated process. My job is rather important because if that company gets too many false flag fires, they will get fined heavily by the city/fire department or if it gets too bad, OSHA will just shut the whole place down. So if I leave, the dayshift security officer is gone, and then (me) the nightshift security guard will be gone too, so no one will have any clue as to what's going on there, and that could pose a problem.

However, when I told them that I wanted to apply for an entry level utilities position, the company seemed overjoyed, (even though they knew they already lost their daytime security officer and this meant losing their nighttime security officer as well). They still told me to apply immediately and gave me an on-the-spot interview. So I am thinking they need new blue collar utilities people more than security people because they are even harder to keep.

Also, this is kind of time-sensitive because that other security company (that pays more) wanted to hire me today, but I asked them to wait until Monday for me to make a decision, and they agreed. So I don't want to hold out for one job and lose both opportunities. That's what makes this kind of complicated.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-27-2018, 08:21 PM
 
5,648 posts, read 5,482,780 times
Reputation: 4168
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vinny Lugo View Post
Well you see that's the problem, because you see what is going on with employer 1, effects employer 2. Here's what I mean by that:

This steel mill that potentially is going to hire me full-time for their company, I do security at on Saturday nights and on Sunday Nights on the midnight shift and I am sub-contracted to do that through my current security company. They have their own in-house security Monday through Friday but they contract my company to do the security on the weekends.


My position there is important because there is a lot of wood, steel, and welding at this company and sometimes fires happen. Now if a fire happens it almost always happens on the dayshift. However, at night sometimes, the power goes out, and plus they have a very faulty alarm system. Constantly on my job there are a lot of false flag alarms. At that point, I have to go shut off the fire alarm, by hand and that sounds like it would be easy but it's actually quite the complicated process. My job is rather important because if that company gets too many false flag fires, they will get fined heavily by the city/fire department or if it gets too bad, OSHA will just shut the whole place down. So if I leave, the dayshift security officer is gone, and then (me) the nightshift security guard will be gone too, so no one will have any clue as to what's going on there, and that could pose a problem.

However, when I told them that I wanted to apply for an entry level utilities position, the company seemed overjoyed, (even though they knew they already lost their daytime security officer and this meant losing their nighttime security officer as well). They still told me to apply immediately and gave me an on-the-spot interview. So I am thinking they need new blue collar utilities people more than security people because they are even harder to keep.

Also, this is kind of time-sensitive because that other security company (that pays more) wanted to hire me today, but I asked them to wait until Monday for me to make a decision, and they agreed. So I don't want to hold out for one job and lose both opportunities. That's what makes this kind of complicated.
If it was me, and I thought the steelworker job had a good chance of going through, I'd hold out for that one. I thought you were going to pass on that other security gig. It didn't sound like advancement to me. You can always sweeten the pot for the steel company by offering to cover the security weekends (for extra money, of course) until they get someone else in place.

It seems like you are at a delicate point, but if you pass on that other gig anyway, it's just you waiting for the steel company to hire you, and you're not any worse off that you were before.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-29-2018, 11:02 PM
 
8,426 posts, read 4,545,021 times
Reputation: 18117
Just get out of the rent-a-cop business any way you can. Don't worry about how the steel mill will be able to fill the open guard position; there are dozens of companies who can send somebody in there. If it takes a while to train them it's not your problem.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-30-2018, 04:12 AM
 
320 posts, read 264,876 times
Reputation: 191
Are your parents poor?

Live them them while you work
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-31-2018, 09:43 AM
 
187 posts, read 353,091 times
Reputation: 295
Vinny: I have no business being on here, I was just looking at Jacksonville for college research, and your thread caught my eye. I am a baby boomer, but also have a son younger than you. I made great money at times, but also years of crappy money working part time while my kids were growing up. I know what its like to be educated and experienced, and still make $10 hour. It happens.

Now, like you, I come on these boards to crowd source information. It has been extremely helpful to me at times. It is also like a slice of life when you look at how great/cliquey/genuine/poser/mean/inspiring people can be. Its all represented.
I want to offer some advice:

1. As far as these boards go: Do not put too much of yourself on here, or explain yourself too much. Honesty is good, but guard your heart the way you would the field at a JAX game. Some members are very judgemental, and comments can be hurtful. This is counterproductive, and a time waster for you.
2. After reading all the replies, pick out the ones who are genuinely helpful to you, I glanced through and did not read everything, but to me, kmarc seems solid, so maybe you can message directly to further explain and ask advice. I have messaged directly a few people, and they were a great source. Then I didn't have to put it all out there for the critics. You can message me if you want!!

Now for the work advice. My DH is retired law enforcement working in private security. EVERYTHING you said is true. Because of contract work, even he is paid crappy, and the only reason he does it is because it is a retirement job and he has a pension. Getting out should be the goal. In the meantime, get some gun training& licensing. It doesn't cost that much, and it will pay a little more if you can be an armed security person. From there, based on your experience, my next advice would be to apply to be a trouper, police officer, court officer, etc., etc. Pay your $10 an hour dues with a job that will take you somewhere. Our friend's son worked as an auxilliary officer in Daytona for crappy pay, but that is where they pull their officers from. Now he is hired by the department and makes good pay and will have a career & PENSION. If you have an associates degree, you are good for now. It is a great career for the right person.

My experience is in marketing, sales, product. I tend to disagree with the advice above regarding retail/fast food/grocery jobs. Yes they pay well and will get you overtime and out of your current situation, but "band-aid" jobs can end up getting you stuck in other ways - nobody wants to give a great-high paying career job outside of retail to a career "retailer". Retail money is like a lure to suck you into a different hole if that is not the end-game for you. My son makes great $ in grocery, but he is 19 and in college. You are around 26, and not in school, right? Be careful going forward. People looking to get out of retail/hospitality are plentiful in Florida! Don't be short sighted - think of the long term goal ALWAYS now. Think of your current living arrangement as specific"jail time", and plan on what you are going to do once you get out. If your credit is bad, pay your bills on time , find out how you can fix that. All companies look at that now.

You are young and able. Alternatives I would suggest are construction trades. You can still run circles around the old-timers. Being young, but having work experience will help you here.You're certainly on the right track with forklift cert. If you can work your way to a skilled position in construction (takes time), you will do well. Go for any on the job training/ apprenticeships offered.

Anyway, good luck. Please update the thread to let us know how it works out. Remember to pay it forward and help/advise others. Your voice might be the one that helps some-one else in the future...thats what CD forums need!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-31-2018, 10:49 AM
 
Location: Florida
6,904 posts, read 3,234,682 times
Reputation: 8374
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vinny Lugo View Post
It will cost me 2k out of pocket to compete my degree
and that will be the best $2k you have ever spent! It's called investing in yourself.

Find a way to save that which is basically $40 a week.

Improve yourself first instead of constantly worrying about bills which will always be there.

Best of luck!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-31-2018, 11:03 AM
 
5,648 posts, read 5,482,780 times
Reputation: 4168
Excellent advice, eileen.

Vinny's good folks, he deserves better. Just from what he has written, I can see he is very conscientious, almost to a fault, where he is concerned about doing freelance security because of his current employer and possible competition. Providing security for private events and such shouldn't be a concern or competition. An employer would be lucky to have him, but today's HR environment often doesn't take these qualities into account.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2018, 06:18 PM
 
Location: New York City
270 posts, read 802,965 times
Reputation: 140
You have a lot of experience in a lot of areas.
Apply to city, state, and federal government jobs. They pay best and have good benefits that include health insurance. Apply to all the hotels and hospitals in your area. They have lots of jobs in all kinds of areas. You have enough security experience. You don't have to do just that anymore. Where would you like to work? Apply there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-11-2018, 05:44 PM
 
193 posts, read 150,839 times
Reputation: 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by kokonutty View Post
Just get out of the rent-a-cop business any way you can. Don't worry about how the steel mill will be able to fill the open guard position; there are dozens of companies who can send somebody in there. If it takes a while to train them it's not your problem.
Quote:
Originally Posted by k00p View Post
Are your parents poor?

Live them them while you work
1) Yes, I plan on getting out of the security field any way that I can. I absolutely hate this business and am really getting low balled in terms of pay.

2) My parents are are a very interesting story indeed. My mother and father both live in Jax. My father basically married a wealthy woman and is being taken care of like a baby. My father has always sucked at making money, and basically remarried in 2015. I was living with he and my brother for about 3 years, and he then just ghosted me and married some wealthy woman out of the blue. He is now living the sweet life with her, but won't help me at all. They won't help me with money, let me live with them or anything. My Dad has a new life and a new family and it's like he has completely forgotten about how much I helped him in the past. My father is basically dead to me.

I am currently living with my brother (a full time engineering student) and my mother. My mother is not very career ambitious at all, and just does odd jobs at times, and is really just waiting to get her retirement check because she turns 62 this year. My mother is practically worthless. Sometimes, she has the rent, and sometimes she does not. She has no career ambition and I will likely leave her in the dust, and likely move out with my brother (who doesn't make much money) in January. I can't stand living with my mother because she is such a screw up.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-11-2018, 06:09 PM
 
193 posts, read 150,839 times
Reputation: 74
Live them them while you work[/quote]

Quote:
Originally Posted by eileen824 View Post
Vinny: I have no business being on here, I was just looking at Jacksonville for college research, and your thread caught my eye. I am a baby boomer, but also have a son younger than you. I made great money at times, but also years of crappy money working part time while my kids were growing up. I know what its like to be educated and experienced, and still make $10 hour. It happens.

Now, like you, I come on these boards to crowd source information. It has been extremely helpful to me at times. It is also like a slice of life when you look at how great/cliquey/genuine/poser/mean/inspiring people can be. Its all represented.
I want to offer some advice:

1. As far as these boards go: Do not put too much of yourself on here, or explain yourself too much. Honesty is good, but guard your heart the way you would the field at a JAX game. Some members are very judgemental, and comments can be hurtful. This is counterproductive, and a time waster for you.
2. After reading all the replies, pick out the ones who are genuinely helpful to you, I glanced through and did not read everything, but to me, kmarc seems solid, so maybe you can message directly to further explain and ask advice. I have messaged directly a few people, and they were a great source. Then I didn't have to put it all out there for the critics. You can message me if you want!!

Now for the work advice. My DH is retired law enforcement working in private security. EVERYTHING you said is true. Because of contract work, even he is paid crappy, and the only reason he does it is because it is a retirement job and he has a pension. Getting out should be the goal. In the meantime, get some gun training& licensing. It doesn't cost that much, and it will pay a little more if you can be an armed security person. From there, based on your experience, my next advice would be to apply to be a trouper, police officer, court officer, etc., etc. Pay your $10 an hour dues with a job that will take you somewhere. Our friend's son worked as an auxilliary officer in Daytona for crappy pay, but that is where they pull their officers from. Now he is hired by the department and makes good pay and will have a career & PENSION. If you have an associates degree, you are good for now. It is a great career for the right person.

My experience is in marketing, sales, product. I tend to disagree with the advice above regarding retail/fast food/grocery jobs. Yes they pay well and will get you overtime and out of your current situation, but "band-aid" jobs can end up getting you stuck in other ways - nobody wants to give a great-high paying career job outside of retail to a career "retailer". Retail money is like a lure to suck you into a different hole if that is not the end-game for you. My son makes great $ in grocery, but he is 19 and in college. You are around 26, and not in school, right? Be careful going forward. People looking to get out of retail/hospitality are plentiful in Florida! Don't be short sighted - think of the long term goal ALWAYS now. Think of your current living arrangement as specific"jail time", and plan on what you are going to do once you get out. If your credit is bad, pay your bills on time , find out how you can fix that. All companies look at that now.

You are young and able. Alternatives I would suggest are construction trades. You can still run circles around the old-timers. Being young, but having work experience will help you here.You're certainly on the right track with forklift cert. If you can work your way to a skilled position in construction (takes time), you will do well. Go for any on the job training/ apprenticeships offered.

Anyway, good luck. Please update the thread to let us know how it works out. Remember to pay it forward and help/advise others. Your voice might be the one that helps some-one else in the future...thats what CD forums need!
I'm just going to be honest with you. I'm a bit of a really bad situation here. My goal was to get into security (which I have been in for nearly 5 years now). I had the goal of being in security because I was later going to go into law enforcement but that career was basically cooked for me through no fault of my own.

Just as you said, "Everything I said about the security field was true". This goes especially for the fact that, "One has to be ex-law enforcement or ex-military to really advance in the field, and no one will admit that but it's true". That being said, I was pursuing a Bachelor's in Public Safety Management to become a police officer. HOWEVER, one really lousy day in April 2016, kind of ruined that for me. It was shortly after my father got married, and my brother and I could no longer afford our apartment because my Dad moved out, completely out of the blue. The apartment was located in a really a lousy neighborhood, but it's all my brother and I could afford at the time.

OKAY NOW HERE'S THE FUN PART:

In April 2016, I was walking outside of my new aparment. Now keep in mind, I have taken multiple martial arts classes, and some in Krav Maga as well. Well, low and behold I come outside. Then, I was about to get in my car, and saw two young guys running towards me. They looked young, and there was a high school nearby, so I thought, "Meh, probably just some school kids jogging and training for school".

NOPE! These two young guys were thugs, and both had fire arms, and I was unarmed at the time. The two thugs had the drop on me, pointed a pistol and pressed it into my stomach so I could not move and said, "You know what this is". Well, they then, robbed me for about $300 in cash, threw me on the ground and they thought I saw their face. I told them I didn't. They pointed a gun barrel towards the end of my skull and were going to pull the trigger. Luckily then a white van drove by and they ran out of there because their would be a witness to the murder.

This was so traumatizing to me, because I came so close to death that I began to have panic attacks. The panic attacks were so bad, that I had to go to a psychiatrist. The anxiety was so bad, that I was put on benzodiazapine tranquilizers (a controlled substance) and was labeled by a medical shrink with having post-traumatic stress disorder.

It has never effected my work as a security officer even in hostile situations (I always keep my cool) and have been told by several of my bosses that I am one of the best employees they have. However, I went to Chicago for a while, for a change of pace. I applied for Chicago PD (all they required was an Associates not a Bachelor's). They were all gung-ho about hiring me, and said I had the perfect resume for the job. HOWEVER, then they did a background check. My criminal record is completely clean but then they saw that I was labeled as having PTSD and was prescribed benzodiazapines for anxiety. This was basically the kiss of death for my career in Law Enforcement. All I can do is become an unarmed security officer now, and I can not even be an armed guard due to the nature of my condition. I worked for years to build this career for it all to come crashing and burning. Now I have to find a new career and that's very depressing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Florida > Jacksonville
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top