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Old 09-29-2010, 10:39 PM
 
Location: Lafayette, Louisiana
14,089 posts, read 24,217,395 times
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Jaguar C-X75 Concept — 2010 Paris Auto Show
it has two gas turbine engines and hub mounted electric motors. In economy mode, the electric motors run off the batteries with the gas turbines regenerating the batteries. Battery only range is 68 miles. The gas turbines regenerating the batteries provide an extra 560 miles. That means with the gas turbines charging the batteries, you get roughly 35mpg. However, in track mode the gas turbines supply power directly to the hub motors for a 0-60 time of 3.4 seconds, quarter mile time of 10.3 seconds at 160 mph, and a top speed of 205mph.
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Old 09-30-2010, 07:12 AM
 
Location: Pikesville, MD
5,229 posts, read 12,288,849 times
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My favorite bit, this view:



Some serious Jetsons looking stuff, right there.
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Old 09-30-2010, 07:21 AM
 
Location: Say-Town! Texas
968 posts, read 2,252,704 times
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fricken turbines man!
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Old 09-30-2010, 08:51 AM
 
Location: Lafayette, Louisiana
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back in the day when GM was powerful, they had a concept jet engine car.
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Old 09-30-2010, 09:31 AM
 
Location: WA
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Chrysler had a turbine car back in the early sixties... was not practical and never went into production.
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Old 10-01-2010, 08:07 AM
 
33,239 posts, read 27,893,235 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cdelena View Post
Chrysler had a turbine car back in the early sixties... was not practical and never went into production.
the chrysler turbine was an interesting vehicle, its biggest problem was that turbines of the day needed time to spool up to make power, and they were quite fuel hungry. the best thing about them though was that they could use any liquid that burned as a fuel.

the difference with the jag turbine is that the turbines are being used only to produce electrical power, which means they can be a lot smaller to use less fuel. they can also be run at a constant rpm so that they can be tuned to run most efficiently at that rpm.
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Old 10-01-2010, 01:12 PM
 
12,872 posts, read 22,655,981 times
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Turbines require a ton of fuel, no way is that more efficient than a recip power source.
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Old 10-02-2010, 07:53 PM
 
33,239 posts, read 27,893,235 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wheelsup View Post
Turbines require a ton of fuel, no way is that more efficient than a recip power source.
you would be right if the turbines were being used to actually propel the car, but as the article points out;

Quote:
Twin micro gas turbines produced by Blandon Jets can charge the batteries while the car is in motion
these are very small turbine engines that only power a generator to produce electricity to recharge the batteries, thus extended the range of the car, and using little fuel overall. the nice thing about using micro turbines is that they are much lighter than an reciprocating engine.

the other nice thing about the turbines is that as long as it burns, you can use any liquid as a fuel.
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Old 10-02-2010, 08:16 PM
 
28,673 posts, read 41,196,392 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rbohm View Post
you would be right if the turbines were being used to actually propel the car, but as the article points out;

these are very small turbine engines that only power a generator to produce electricity to recharge the batteries
, thus extended the range of the car, and using little fuel overall. the nice thing about using micro turbines is that they are much lighter than an reciprocating engine.

the other nice thing about the turbines is that as long as it burns, you can use any liquid as a fuel.
From the Jaguar copy:

"These can either generate 140kW (188bhp) to charge the batteries and extend the range of the car to a remarkable 900km (560 miles) – enough to drive from London to Berlin on a single tank – or when in Track mode provide supplementary power directly to the electric motors. The four electric motors provide torque-vectored, all-wheel drive traction and grip, essential in a car that produces 580kW (778bhp) and 1600Nm (1180lb ft) of torque."
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Old 10-02-2010, 09:05 PM
 
12,872 posts, read 22,655,981 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rbohm View Post
you would be right if the turbines were being used to actually propel the car, but as the article points out;



these are very small turbine engines that only power a generator to produce electricity to recharge the batteries, thus extended the range of the car, and using little fuel overall. the nice thing about using micro turbines is that they are much lighter than an reciprocating engine.

the other nice thing about the turbines is that as long as it burns, you can use any liquid as a fuel.
You are nuts. The "small" turbines may burn less fuel than a "large" turbine but it is an inefficient way to power anything on the ground.

If what you say is true, why are diesel electric trains using recip-diesel engines vs. turbines? Why do emergency power generators use recip-diesel engines?

Turbines make sense when used in aircraft in the higher elevations. This allows greatly reduced fuel burn combined with less drag in the air to provide an efficient yet quick form of power. Also, turbines can provide much more power than a reciprocating engine could ever think of producing. Not an issue for cars.

Not to mention, if those really are turbines, do you have any idea how loud they would be?
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