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Old 07-01-2011, 08:49 AM
 
2,282 posts, read 3,667,906 times
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Well folks, after a short, but tumultuous job search, I received an official offer yesterday from a promising IT company. I like my prospects for growth in this company very much. Here's the thing. Everyone who I've talked to about it (friends, colleagues, family, etc.) insists that I need to negotiate a higher salary; that it's expected. After some Google searching, it seems this is a common practice. I've only had one job post-college and I didn't negotiate a salary during that time because I desperately needed a job. Needless to say, I'm inexperienced in this aspect of job hunting.

The scenario goes like this. In the beginning, they asked for my salary range. I gave them a range of $10,000. They said that the high end of my range was out of their range, but they could meet me in the middle. The salary they offered is approximately a 5.5% increase compared to what I'm making now. The "in the middle" I was expecting was at least $3,000 more than this figure.

I realize that, in order to evaluate what a good salary for this type of position looks like, I need to research similar positions in my geographical area. The problem is, the title of this position seems pretty obscure. I've tried Payscale, Salary.com, Glassdoor...and none of these sites can really pinpoint a similar job.

What is a good strategy at this point? What sort of pointers do you seasoned veterans have pertaining to salary evaluation and negotiation?

Last edited by Z3N1TH 0N3; 07-01-2011 at 08:57 AM..
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Old 07-01-2011, 11:05 AM
 
Location: NYC
4,171 posts, read 3,764,802 times
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I think it all depends on how strong of a candidate you are and the type of company this is. If this is a small startup, $3000 might be a big deal. But I can't imagine a big well established company losing a potentially good hire over $3000. Also, you have to realize while $3000 sounds great, you won't see that much of a difference in your paycheck.

I'm assuming you are currently working. In that case, a company knows they have to give you a bit more in order for you to leave. You can always say, I'm on the fence about just staying at my current job but $3000 more would really seal the deal for me. I was in a similar situation one time where the company hiring basically told me I was asking for too much. I just stood firm and said in that case, I will have to consider just staying at my current job. They said they'll discuss it internally and a few hours later, I got the salary I wanted. I didn't take that job though.
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Old 07-01-2011, 11:24 AM
 
Location: Stuck on the East Coast, hoping to head West
4,596 posts, read 10,717,708 times
Reputation: 9703
I simply ask "Is that the best you can do?" The key is to be quiet and let them respond. Then, after they respond, ask for time to consider the offer. I usually ask for 24 hours to consider the offer. Sometimes they'll pressure me and say they need a response as soon as possible. At that point, I'll ask for at least 2 hours and explain that I would LOVE to work for the company, but the salary is just a little lower than I'd expected based on my research. I last did this in 2008, in a really competitive environment, and it worked. Alternatively, if the company can't offer more money, are they willing to give you more vacation or something else that you'd value?
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Old 07-01-2011, 03:16 PM
 
Location: London
1,584 posts, read 3,475,752 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adhom View Post
I think it all depends on how strong of a candidate you are and the type of company this is. If this is a small startup, $3000 might be a big deal. But I can't imagine a big well established company losing a potentially good hire over $3000. Also, you have to realize while $3000 sounds great, you won't see that much of a difference in your paycheck.

I'm assuming you are currently working. In that case, a company knows they have to give you a bit more in order for you to leave. You can always say, I'm on the fence about just staying at my current job but $3000 more would really seal the deal for me. I was in a similar situation one time where the company hiring basically told me I was asking for too much. I just stood firm and said in that case, I will have to consider just staying at my current job. They said they'll discuss it internally and a few hours later, I got the salary I wanted. I didn't take that job though.

I agree with this.
And congrats!!
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Old 07-01-2011, 04:34 PM
 
Location: Metro Detroit, Michigan
19,914 posts, read 17,661,379 times
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If you feel you have the background and skills necessary to drive a better bargain, by all means, it's worth a shot. Since you said your job search has been short, they probably realize you aren't too incredibly desperate. I have never experienced a problem negotiating a better starting wage, and I suspect many companies are offering low wages/salaries to see if they can get good labor cheaper. If the skills are in demand, chances are they are not going to fill the position for peanuts.
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Old 07-02-2011, 08:52 AM
 
2,513 posts, read 4,897,013 times
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If the job is obscure, I would say the better plan is to ask for an agreement that in six months they will review your performance and if it exceeds expectations they will raise you the $3k.

The good thing is you have a standing offer. Is it worth it to you to forego the additional $3k in order to earn more than you are earning now and get the opportunity for growth that you have been looking for? That's what you have to decide.
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Old 07-04-2011, 08:56 PM
 
2,282 posts, read 3,667,906 times
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Well, tomorrow is D-Day (Decision Day). I think I'm going to ask them how flexible they are on the salary. Then, based on my experience (which is on the high end for this position), my skill set, and my educational background, I will try to bargain for the additional $3000. I don't believe it is an amount that would be considered out of reach.

I feel like if I don't ask, I'll feel regret it over time, especially if a new internal opportunity doesn't materialize for quite some time. I mean, the worse that can happen is they say 'No', right?

Wish me luck, pray for me, do whatever haha. I will need all the positive energy you can muster!
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Old 07-04-2011, 08:59 PM
 
4,805 posts, read 21,722,073 times
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If you want 3k, ask for a little more (maybe 4k) and negotiate down.
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Old 07-05-2011, 02:42 PM
 
2,282 posts, read 3,667,906 times
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Okay, so I used some of the insights I gathered from both the Internet and this forum and contacted the company about the offer. I explained that I believed the value of my services for this particular position, based on my skill set, experience, and salary research, was the initial base offer plus $4,000 (thanks, kodaka). The HR director said she'd get with the department director and follow up with me shortly. I'm hoping to hear back from them either later today or earlier tomorrow morning. *Crossing Fingers*

I will keep you posted. Thanks!
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Old 07-05-2011, 03:35 PM
 
Location: Stuck on the East Coast, hoping to head West
4,596 posts, read 10,717,708 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Z3N1TH 0N3 View Post
Okay, so I used some of the insights I gathered from both the Internet and this forum and contacted the company about the offer. I explained that I believed the value of my services for this particular position, based on my skill set, experience, and salary research, was the initial base offer plus $4,000 (thanks, kodaka). The HR director said she'd get with the department director and follow up with me shortly. I'm hoping to hear back from them either later today or earlier tomorrow morning. *Crossing Fingers*

I will keep you posted. Thanks!
Good for you! Wouldn't that be great if they came back and offered the $4,000?
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