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Old 05-15-2012, 09:48 PM
 
2,644 posts, read 2,248,128 times
Reputation: 1925

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I'm a 22 year old male who is moving from FL to NY, and I have about 6 years of continuous work experience. 6 years in customer service, and 4 years in retail. I do not have a job waiting for me when i get to NY, so I need to create a resume and send them out as soon as I get there.

Only one thing: I've never made a resume. Every job I've got was thru the standard application and interview process. I've read books, surfed the internet but there's so much contradictory advice, some that sounds use-full, some useless. I dont even know where to begin.

Anyone have any advice or tips? What's important and what isnt? What should be included and what shouldn't?

Welp : (
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Old 05-16-2012, 02:17 PM
 
85 posts, read 247,949 times
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First, find any template online and just fill it out. Don't worry if it's right or wrong: it WILL be wrong.

Then, find people to critique it. Friends, coworkers, teachers, career counselors.

And then update it. Resumes are living documents. Repeat as many times as possible.

Because, frankly, if you haven't even tried yet, asking here will just get you more questions than answers.

At the minimum, the resume needs:
Your name and contact info
Skills
Work Experience
Education

A lot of it depends on the industry and what kind of job you're looking for.
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Old 05-16-2012, 02:31 PM
 
8,519 posts, read 14,760,700 times
Reputation: 7671
Wow! Moving to NY without a job lined up? I hope you have a lot of money saved up.

As for the resume, you need to start off by understanding what a resume is and isn't. A lot of people write it as if it's simply a description of what they've done and what skills they have. But a resume is really a marketing document. Imagine that you're a hiring manager. You're extremely busy and can only devote a minute to reading someone's resume. You may not even make it to the end because you've read far enough to decide it's not worth finishing. The resume has to really sell the candidate.

What I would do is brainstorm a bit. Come up with a list of all your strengths, all of your accomplishments, all of the things you think would be a value to a potential employer. What skills have you learned? Do you have a degree? Did you work for a well-known company? Did you have an impressive title?

Next, take all of this information and organize it. There's no one resume structure that fits everyone. You have to tailor it based on your own background. For example, someone fresh out of school with no experience will probably list his education early in the resume since that's one of his biggest selling points whereas someone who's been working for 10 years would probably list his education at the end. A lot of people start off their resume by listing their objective. I personally think that's silly. The employer knows what you're objective is. It's to get a job. I actually start my resume with a summary of who I am, what I've done, and why an employer would benefit from hiring me. It doesn't have to be long, maybe 2 sentences. Obviously, your resume should start with your name, contact info, etc. Then you'd have the summary, followed by maybe a skills section or your education depending on how experienced you are. Or you might follow the skills section with experience. Some people list their jobs in chronological order, starting with the most recent. I've seen other people list their jobs in order of relevance to the job they're applying. You'll have to decide what works for you. As for each job, don't just describe what you did. List your accomplishments, but frame them in a way that shows how you helped your company. For example, if you improved a process or saved the company money, list that. But don't just say you worked on something.

Lastly, don't give away everything. Marketing is all about getting the viewer interested in learning more. You want the reader to call you and ask you to go into more detail about a project you did or skill you mastered.
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Old 05-16-2012, 07:45 PM
 
2,644 posts, read 2,248,128 times
Reputation: 1925
Quote:
Originally Posted by DennyCrane View Post
Wow! Moving to NY without a job lined up? I hope you have a lot of money saved up.

As for the resume, you need to start off by understanding what a resume is and isn't. A lot of people write it as if it's simply a description of what they've done and what skills they have. But a resume is really a marketing document. Imagine that you're a hiring manager. You're extremely busy and can only devote a minute to reading someone's resume. You may not even make it to the end because you've read far enough to decide it's not worth finishing. The resume has to really sell the candidate.

What I would do is brainstorm a bit. Come up with a list of all your strengths, all of your accomplishments, all of the things you think would be a value to a potential employer. What skills have you learned? Do you have a degree? Did you work for a well-known company? Did you have an impressive title?

Next, take all of this information and organize it. There's no one resume structure that fits everyone. You have to tailor it based on your own background. For example, someone fresh out of school with no experience will probably list his education early in the resume since that's one of his biggest selling points whereas someone who's been working for 10 years would probably list his education at the end. A lot of people start off their resume by listing their objective. I personally think that's silly. The employer knows what you're objective is. It's to get a job. I actually start my resume with a summary of who I am, what I've done, and why an employer would benefit from hiring me. It doesn't have to be long, maybe 2 sentences. Obviously, your resume should start with your name, contact info, etc. Then you'd have the summary, followed by maybe a skills section or your education depending on how experienced you are. Or you might follow the skills section with experience. Some people list their jobs in chronological order, starting with the most recent. I've seen other people list their jobs in order of relevance to the job they're applying. You'll have to decide what works for you. As for each job, don't just describe what you did. List your accomplishments, but frame them in a way that shows how you helped your company. For example, if you improved a process or saved the company money, list that. But don't just say you worked on something.

Lastly, don't give away everything. Marketing is all about getting the viewer interested in learning more. You want the reader to call you and ask you to go into more detail about a project you did or skill you mastered.
Thank you for all the tips! They were very helpful, I am making the resume as of now.

I've listed most of what you've put down but I wanted to know whether or not I should list references?
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Old 05-17-2012, 03:41 PM
 
8,519 posts, read 14,760,700 times
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Do not list references. That should be a separate document. In fact, don't even say on your resume that references are available on request. A lot of people do that, but there's really no point. Employers will assume you can produce them so no need to say that you can.
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