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Old 11-11-2007, 06:16 PM
 
Location: Major Metro
1,083 posts, read 2,159,847 times
Reputation: 364

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Quote:
Originally Posted by goodtype View Post
I am glad to see people interview their potential boss before being hired but what do you ask him/her? How do you determine if there is a match between the corporate culture and your style/personality?
I ask what do they like best about working for the company? The answer provides clues about what's important to them. For example if they say "the people", they have an interest in teamwork. If they say "work/life balance", family/personal pursuits is important. If they say "the automomy they have", then independence is an important factor to them. In addition, I use my own observations to understand the culture including dress (formal or business casual, traditional colors or more individualized looks), first name or last name or last names used like first names, office/cube set-ups, pictures on desks or not. All of these things are subtle but can help characterize a company. Of course, nothing is better than talking to potential co-workers to learn more.
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Old 11-11-2007, 08:29 PM
 
Location: Michigan
58 posts, read 150,303 times
Reputation: 40
I would advise going beyond the typical answers and questions. What's wrong with a few incisive, insightful and especially new and valid questions they don't get often...asking the culture is a very typical one...so you ARE going to get a typical answer. Try this instead:

Tell me about how you'd believe I would fit into the existing team? With you?

What would the other team members say about my joining their team?

What could I do to exceed the expectations for the role?

Can you see how asking how to exceed expectations will let you know if the work environment will even want that? What if you DO like to go above and beyond? What if they DON'T? Or vice versa?

Do you see how asking how the other teams members feel about you joining the company...you gather info from a non typical question more easily AND you show you're thinking about being there already (by using the word joining). And by using words like "feel", "your opinion" you can get to their answers...not just the company line.

All it takes is a little thought beyond the typical to get to the real answers whether you're an interviewer or interviewee...works both ways equally well.
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Old 11-12-2007, 10:05 AM
 
Location: in drifts of snow wherever you go
2,493 posts, read 3,654,478 times
Reputation: 692
Goodtype,

Your questions remind me of Dingler. Did you change your user name? If so, why did you do that?

Greenie
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Old 11-12-2007, 10:10 AM
 
Location: Dallas, TX
2 posts, read 6,198 times
Reputation: 11
Lightbulb Interview your boss during your interview

I would interview the boss during my own interview. By asking specific questions on the structure of the company, the attitude, how laid back is it, etc. will help. Also, ask how long that manager has been in his position, sometimes a newer boss can be the worst if they get power hungry. Beware though, I would ask these questions casually so you do not send the wrong message.

Another tip would be to Google your boss (as I know they are definetly googling you!) and see if anyone has written horrible things about them or about the company.

Just some ideas.

- Shannon
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Old 11-12-2007, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Fort Worth/Dallas
11,878 posts, read 34,584,071 times
Reputation: 5613
Quote:
Originally Posted by christina0001 View Post
Oh yes, absolutely. Generally at the end of interviews, the interviewer asks if you have any questions. I usually ask the manager:

what his/her management style is
describe the climate/feel of the office
employee turnover
Me too! A good manager appreciates these kinds of questions.
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Old 11-12-2007, 11:04 AM
 
Location: southern california
61,305 posts, read 79,715,095 times
Reputation: 55458
common biz courtesy in a perm job is to meet people you will working with usually on the 2nd interview. (yes 2nd interview)
if you are a temp that will not happen.
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Old 11-14-2007, 08:03 PM
 
Location: Everywhere USA
349 posts, read 826,859 times
Reputation: 535
Default Resources to check too

Indeed.com and Vault.com are sources to find out what people have to say...helps to look into them if the company is large enough.

Research and questions will still, only get you some 1/2 truths...sadly.

Good luck with your search!
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Old 11-26-2007, 10:52 PM
 
Location: Michigan
58 posts, read 150,303 times
Reputation: 40
Default And Be Memorable in Your NextJob Interview

All good questions just be sure they are what we'll call "open-ended" questions, so you can GATHER information you can use! And remember, you typically only have 3-5 minutes for questions at the end of each interview...so use them wisely!

Closed Ended Question: "How many people are in the department". Your interviewer can answer this closed question by saying: 8. That's it, you've gathered nothing of real value. Try this instead:

Open Ended Question: "Describe the whole department to me, co-workers, other areas we'll deal with, kind of an overview of the function, the people and the environment?"--Now this open question forces a real response...instead of a one word answer.

I can see from the posts most of you get this...so if you're already using open ended questions, you can also think about how to make yourself sound different than all the other candidates...take it up a level and ask something unexpected but relevant.

Sounding different and relevant will make you memorable in a good way. Here's an example on the same topic, ask this: "Describe for me the most difficult part of the job and what you believe to be are the easiest tasks. Also, why are they easy or difficult in your opinion?" Now you're really finding out if you want to work there and you'll know whether this job is for you.
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Old 11-27-2007, 09:02 AM
 
25 posts, read 139,528 times
Reputation: 74
OK, I definitely agree it should be. But I faced a special case in my current job.

I accept this important offer most partly because I really enjoy my manager's style, who is the person taking interview with me. I am sure he is very nice boss and I can learn more from workplace. He is french guy. After 18 months he decided to go back franch due to family affairs. and A new manager was on board, who I found didn't match with me.

Well, How can I , Should I post my resignation now?
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Old 11-27-2007, 12:46 PM
 
5,656 posts, read 17,996,449 times
Reputation: 4054
I absolutely do. Which is why I like doing the "temp to hire" positions, that gives you the option of seeing how the business really operates. I have turned down a position I temped at because the bill collectors were calling there all the time... yeah I wanna work there... NOT.

Be forewarned though, Sometimes you ask questions which they are not prepared to answer. i.e. you are too thorough. That is a red flag to me.
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