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Old 11-10-2007, 05:00 PM
 
238 posts, read 1,073,299 times
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People work so hard to answer all the questions correctly when they interview for a job. They work on their talking points and work so hard to sell them selves to employers. But when they get close to a job offer they do not do the next logical thing- find out if the job is a good match.

I know from experience that accepting the wrong job with a bad boss in a corporate culture that does not match your style can set your career back years. I had never thought about interviewing the boss when I was younger and made a terrible mistake accepting a variety of jobs with companies that were not right for me.

Do you interview the boss before a offer and if so, how do you do it?
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Old 11-10-2007, 05:20 PM
 
8,497 posts, read 27,493,528 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goodtype View Post

Do you interview the boss before a offer and if so, how do you do it?
Absolutely. An interview is a 2-way street. In the best cases, the rapport between the interviewer and candidate should be fluid and comfortable, so the candidate should be comfortable asking questions about the job, company, and the manager's style.

It's your responsibility to do your own due diligence before making a commitment like accepting a job - a good boss will expect that.
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Old 11-10-2007, 07:18 PM
dgz
 
806 posts, read 3,156,860 times
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Yes, definately! A large part of whether you will like a job is whether you get along with the boss. I've interviewed for a few positions where my future boss was not even in the interview sessions. I always insisted in those cases that I couldn't accept the position unless I met with him or her first.

I've always found it's important to get a sense of:

Will this person let you do your job or will they try to micro-manage?

Are they ok with you disagreeing with them occasionally (note: disagreeing, not being insubordinate)?

Will they value that you are the 'expert' on your job and that what you bring to the job is valuable?

Do they themselves try to maintain a work-life balance with their job and do they expect their employees to do so as well?

Last edited by dgz; 11-10-2007 at 07:39 PM..
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Old 11-10-2007, 07:28 PM
 
Location: Ridgway/Saint Marys, PS
947 posts, read 3,357,412 times
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I absolutely do as well when I get the chance.

Iask him what kind of equipment the facility has, how many co-workers Id have, and just general questions about the station and the area to get a feel for his attitude.
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Old 11-11-2007, 03:11 AM
 
Location: Cary, NC
2,407 posts, read 10,098,331 times
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Absolutely. Interviews are a good chance to see if it's a good fit for the company. If I believe that it is not going to be a good match, I will thank the interviewer for his/her time and save them the trouble of continuing with the interview if it is clearly not going to work out.
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Old 11-11-2007, 07:18 AM
 
Location: Northern Colorado
7,517 posts, read 17,674,987 times
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I also do an "interview" (to myself) with a potential boss. During an interview, I also like to be taken around the business and shown different areas........especially the area that I would be working in. Then, if the employer does hire me, that following "90 day probation" time is not only for the employer to evaluate me, but I also evaluate the employer. I don't like quiting a job, but, if I don't like my evaluation of the company and/or employees, I won't stay.
In reality, a boss and a new employee don't really know each other until the employee has worked for the boss for a few months. Just like men/women relationships, the boss and you (and your fellow employees) don't really know each other until after a few months and a problem or two arises. I know for a fact, if my last supervisor would have known the kind of "outspoken, aggressive" personality I have, he would have never hired me. I worked for the man directly and his personality and mine was very different. Glad I am away from him.
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Old 11-11-2007, 08:53 AM
 
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I am glad to see people interview their potential boss before being hired but what do you ask him/her? How do you determine if there is a match between the corporate culture and your style/personality?
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Old 11-11-2007, 09:25 AM
 
8,497 posts, read 27,493,528 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goodtype View Post
I am glad to see people interview their potential boss before being hired but what do you ask him/her? How do you determine if there is a match between the corporate culture and your style/personality?
I'm not sure what you mean by this, but I am guessing you are alluding to some specific questions like "will I have to work overtime" and such? Most of the time corporate culture is dictated by the size and industry, and to be honest most large corps are pretty much the same nowadays. Once you've worked out pay and benes, seen the workplace, it all just comes down to personalities.

If that is the case, the best thing to do is just ask, tactfully, and not be coy or talk around your questions. Perhaps if you give me some questions I can give you some idea of how to ask them tactfully.
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Old 11-11-2007, 10:13 AM
 
11,181 posts, read 10,431,829 times
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Yes, most definitely!

But the employer will only tell you what they want you to hear, and vice versa. The truth comes out after the 'honeymoon' period is over.
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Old 11-11-2007, 03:01 PM
 
Location: Missouri
6,046 posts, read 22,496,189 times
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Oh yes, absolutely. Generally at the end of interviews, the interviewer asks if you have any questions. I usually ask the manager:

what his/her management style is
describe the climate/feel of the office
employee turnover
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