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Old 03-08-2014, 11:19 AM
 
55 posts, read 53,938 times
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IT department in Big company, among Fortune 100.
I have not received the offer yet, but want to know how to do salary negotiation effectively:

1) If company decides to hire me, HR recruiter will call me to extend a verbal offer, for example we will offer salary as $xxxxxx, at this point of time, if I want more salary, then which would be good way to deliber my intention? phone call or E-Mail? or it doesn't matter?

2) How much chance, generally speaking, company could cancel the offer if candidate would do the counter-offer? Normally they do not? or Candidate should be careful on counter-offer? worry something?

3) If Big company skips the oral offer and just email written offer, then candidate still has a chance to do the counter-offer?
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Old 03-08-2014, 11:32 AM
 
Location: SC
8,794 posts, read 6,856,719 times
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Didn't they tell you what the job pays before or during the interview?
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Old 03-08-2014, 11:43 AM
 
55 posts, read 53,938 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blktoptrvl View Post
Didn't they tell you what the job pays before or during the interview?
Not exact amount, he said just possible Range....
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Old 03-08-2014, 11:45 AM
 
2,283 posts, read 3,464,237 times
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There's always about a 15-20% chance that the company will flat out rescind an offer if you try to counter.

Your offer could be verbal or written - I do both (verbal when I know there will be negotiation, written when I'm pretty sure what I'm offering will be taken right away - I detest the paperwork).

If it's verbal, it is generally acceptable to counter at that time if there are definite roadblocks. Understand, however, that you will bring the 15-20% into play at this point. In many cases, the HR squib delivering the offer will have no authority to negotiate or counter your counter. They will "have to take this back to the hiring team", so make sure you're clear about what you're looking for. This brings us to the written counter offer:

1. Don't send this in haste. If English is not your native language, make sure you have a native speaker help you, or take your time checking the verbiage, spelling, grammar, etc. Whatever you put in writing will be sent to many people - if their impression of you changes, the offer gets pulled and they go to Plan B.

2. Be clear. Whatever it is that you are countering with, make sure that you don't mix issues or bring in other topics/red herrings/straw men. If it is the salary, make it about the salary - not your family, your sign, your potential, your feelings. Stay on topic.

3. Cover all your bases. This is your one chance to negotiate, don't just discuss salary, if benefits, work hours, etc. are also a concern. Spell it all out.

4. Be final. If the answer is "yes" - don't ask for more. You'll be scrapped immediately at that point.
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Old 03-08-2014, 11:58 AM
 
55 posts, read 53,938 times
Reputation: 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoadWarrior12 View Post
There's always about a 15-20% chance that the company will flat out rescind an offer if you try to counter.

Your offer could be verbal or written - I do both (verbal when I know there will be negotiation, written when I'm pretty sure what I'm offering will be taken right away - I detest the paperwork).

If it's verbal, it is generally acceptable to counter at that time if there are definite roadblocks. Understand, however, that you will bring the 15-20% into play at this point. In many cases, the HR squib delivering the offer will have no authority to negotiate or counter your counter. They will "have to take this back to the hiring team", so make sure you're clear about what you're looking for. This brings us to the written counter offer:

1. Don't send this in haste. If English is not your native language, make sure you have a native speaker help you, or take your time checking the verbiage, spelling, grammar, etc. Whatever you put in writing will be sent to many people - if their impression of you changes, the offer gets pulled and they go to Plan B.

2. Be clear. Whatever it is that you are countering with, make sure that you don't mix issues or bring in other topics/red herrings/straw men. If it is the salary, make it about the salary - not your family, your sign, your potential, your feelings. Stay on topic.

3. Cover all your bases. This is your one chance to negotiate, don't just discuss salary, if benefits, work hours, etc. are also a concern. Spell it all out.

4. Be final. If the answer is "yes" - don't ask for more. You'll be scrapped immediately at that point.
=============
Great Advice!!

Can I mention my existing offer which I got recently to use as a some kind of Leverage?
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Old 03-08-2014, 12:00 PM
 
2,283 posts, read 3,464,237 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunflower7777 View Post
=============
Great Advice!!

Can I mention my existing offer which I got recently to use as a some kind of Leverage?
Absolutely. If you're comfortable with "well, we won't match that" as a response.
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Old 03-08-2014, 12:35 PM
 
55 posts, read 53,938 times
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1) How to know it's lowball offer or not?
2) Big company has some kind of "take it or leave" in offering job, I guess, is it worth to try to get $5K more?
3) Always trying to counter-offer to make sure that's the maximum possible amount?
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Old 03-08-2014, 01:03 PM
 
2,283 posts, read 3,464,237 times
Reputation: 3677
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunflower7777 View Post
1) How to know it's lowball offer or not?
2) Big company has some kind of "take it or leave" in offering job, I guess, is it worth to try to get $5K more?
3) Always trying to counter-offer to make sure that's the maximum possible amount?
You have another offer to compare to, right? That'll solve the lowball piece. If they present it as "take or leave it", that means take the offer as it stands, or they move to another candidate.
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