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Old 01-10-2008, 10:09 PM
 
212 posts, read 785,131 times
Reputation: 142

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What do you think of employment agencies and do they really care about you. I have gotten all my jobs from direct ads employers put in the web or newspaper. Agencies send out on one or two interviews and you never hear from them again. I wonder if the ads you see by employment agencies really exist.
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Old 01-10-2008, 10:38 PM
 
Location: Sanford, FL
732 posts, read 3,989,355 times
Reputation: 403
One time I needed a second job so I went to one. When I walked there were a bunch of homeless down trotted people. I thought to myself I am sure to find a job here. I am highly qualified against these people. I got my own transportation, am reliable, and have trades. I get an interview the guy says he'll call me in 2 days and never called. I called back and I couldnt get a hold of him.
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Old 01-11-2008, 10:18 AM
 
5,656 posts, read 18,300,136 times
Reputation: 4070
I have dealt with good and bad ones. And I have gotten two full time positions through employment agencies through temp-to-hire positions. You have to feel them out.
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Old 01-11-2008, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Burlington County NJ
1,969 posts, read 5,640,574 times
Reputation: 2667
I got all my experience starting out with them. Worked for several. Sometimes i had 1 week assignments sometimes i had 6 month assignments. Once they got to know me and knew I was a reliable hardworker I was having to turn jobs down. It was a good way for me to start.
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Old 01-11-2008, 02:12 PM
 
Location: 55 Miles East of Sanity :D
791 posts, read 1,734,613 times
Reputation: 812
The first thought out of my head is that an Employment Agency should be used ONLY as a secondary back-up option. Fortunately I've only had cause to use one on 3 occasions in the last 30+ years, but the times that I did, I was HIGHLY disappointed, extremely UNimpressed and very skeptical.

I question their loyalties and motives, because they don't seem to expend much energy or effort in placing their applicants. Nor do they paint a positive picture when it comes to possibilities and options. But more importantly, or sadly, I should say, is they aren't very welcoming or personable. (I don't know about ya'll, but it would seem the last thing a jobless person needs is to find themselves in front of a grump, and having to rely on them to find them a job. )

It just seems odd to me that they would post positions online and in the newspapers, saying they need to be filled immediately, but when you sign up, they say 'well, I don't have much right now'. HUH??????? They post a job with desired qualifications, you respond to the ad because you have 'said' qualifications, and then all of a sudden, they don't have anything????? B.! S.! There's something going on that they aren't telling us, and it's not good.

I often wonder if they get paid 'per ad', and not 'per placement'. If they got paid by 'placing' people, you'd think they'd be happier to see you, and more eager to schedule interviews with employers.

Alternatively, I have known many people that have had very good experiences, so you just have to see for yourself. In fact, I worked with one woman that worked thru the same agency, for the same company for over 5 years. She didn't want to be bound by the company's policies and such, so she remained a 'temp' and was very happy. The employer really liked her, and the arrangement worked for them too, so it all worked out. Go figure. It just shows to go ya....you never can tell.

With that said, I must agree with nic529....they do tend to treat you better the longer you are with them, and they've seen how committed and invested you are.

Bottom Line: It couldn't hurt to shop around to find an agency you feel comfortable with, but don't rely on them as your sole resource. If you feel it is you only option, sign up with several different agencies. It'll broaden your chances. Just remember that you deserve respect regardless of your skill level & experience.

Sorry about going on & on....I do that sometimes...ok, all the time. But I hope this helps.

Still Skeptical ,
Boof

PS: This statement is my personal opinion only, and has been obtained through the experiences of myself, friends and family.
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Old 01-11-2008, 02:40 PM
 
Location: Sanford, FL
732 posts, read 3,989,355 times
Reputation: 403
They say they have no openings for you because they are waiting for some illegals and drunk bums to come in so they can pay them $4 an hour less then you.
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Old 01-11-2008, 08:54 PM
 
Location: 55 Miles East of Sanity :D
791 posts, read 1,734,613 times
Reputation: 812
Wink Did you hear something?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fnix View Post
They say they have no openings for you because they are waiting for some illegals and drunk bums to come in so they can pay them $4 an hour less then you.
ROFLMAO Ain't that the Dam*ed truth!!!!!!!!! ^^^^^5

Skunked again,
Boof
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Old 01-12-2008, 12:43 AM
 
2,141 posts, read 7,491,072 times
Reputation: 1269
Having worked in the staffing company industry, I can shed some light on this topic. First of all, there is a difference between light industrial and office placement companies. My experience is with office placements. As someone who has interviewed 30 candidates a week and have found jobs for many, this is what I will say.
1) Show up at your interview on time and in interview attire. No flip flops, jeans, t shirts, etc. Wear professional clothes
2) Bring a list of good reference with you
3) Call the agency once a week to check in for work
4) If you accept as assignment, stand by your commitment. If you must end the assignment, give a 2 week notice (if it's a longer assignment)
5) Treat your temporary assignment as you would any job. Be on time and don't take time off, unless you really have to. If you have upcoming doctor appointments, court dates, dentist appointements, etc. tell the staffing agency before you start the assignment so that they can clear it with their client.
6) ANY temporary assignment may turn into a permanent job. You never know and neither does the temporary agency. So put your "best foot forward" all of the time
7) Remember that staffing services work very hard to get jobs. They compete against other agencies to get the business of clients. People in staffing earn money when they find you work - so they want you to work as badly as you want to work. But they can't control your productivity and professionalism once you start an assignment.
8) YOU represent the staffing agency that places you. That means if you work hard and are a good employee at the client site, you're making both yourself and the agency look good. Staffing firms LOVE candidate like you. However, if you screw up, chances are the staffing agency lost a client because you called in sick too many times or were late too many times. A salesrep at the staffing firm may have worked 8 months to get that client, that you now lost for them in 2 weeks. There are 2 sides to every coin and often temps don't consider the side of the agency.
8) If you don't hear from an agency, that means that they don't have a job for you OR they have jobs open but you're not qualified for those jobs. Again, they want you to work. Its how they stay in business and earn their paychecks.
9) Take advantage of the plus side of working with a staffing company. They often have clients that only use them to hire people. I've placed temps at some GREAT companies and the temps eventually got hired by my clients and are working there years later. Some companies only hire people this way so it can be a wonderful way to get a job. A good job.
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Old 01-12-2008, 12:51 AM
 
2,141 posts, read 7,491,072 times
Reputation: 1269
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boof View Post
The first thought out of my head is that an Employment Agency should be used ONLY as a secondary back-up option. Fortunately I've only had cause to use one on 3 occasions in the last 30+ years, but the times that I did, I was HIGHLY disappointed, extremely UNimpressed and very skeptical.

I question their loyalties and motives, because they don't seem to expend much energy or effort in placing their applicants. Nor do they paint a positive picture when it comes to possibilities and options. But more importantly, or sadly, I should say, is they aren't very welcoming or personable. (I don't know about ya'll, but it would seem the last thing a jobless person needs is to find themselves in front of a grump, and having to rely on them to find them a job. )

It just seems odd to me that they would post positions online and in the newspapers, saying they need to be filled immediately, but when you sign up, they say 'well, I don't have much right now'. HUH??????? They post a job with desired qualifications, you respond to the ad because you have 'said' qualifications, and then all of a sudden, they don't have anything????? B.! S.! There's something going on that they aren't telling us, and it's not good.

I often wonder if they get paid 'per ad', and not 'per placement'. If they got paid by 'placing' people, you'd think they'd be happier to see you, and more eager to schedule interviews with employers.

Alternatively, I have known many people that have had very good experiences, so you just have to see for yourself. In fact, I worked with one woman that worked thru the same agency, for the same company for over 5 years. She didn't want to be bound by the company's policies and such, so she remained a 'temp' and was very happy. The employer really liked her, and the arrangement worked for them too, so it all worked out. Go figure. It just shows to go ya....you never can tell.

With that said, I must agree with nic529....they do tend to treat you better the longer you are with them, and they've seen how committed and invested you are.

Bottom Line: It couldn't hurt to shop around to find an agency you feel comfortable with, but don't rely on them as your sole resource. If you feel it is you only option, sign up with several different agencies. It'll broaden your chances. Just remember that you deserve respect regardless of your skill level & experience.

Sorry about going on & on....I do that sometimes...ok, all the time. But I hope this helps.

Still Skeptical ,
Boof

PS: This statement is my personal opinion only, and has been obtained through the experiences of myself, friends and family.

The reason we post jobs is that we need people all of the time for different jobs. Our clients expect us to send them resumes of qualified people as soon as they call. And we never know when they're going to call. So I may have a client that calls me one day needing 10 customer service reps and they want resumes by the end of the day. In order to have enough candidates available, we have to always be recruiting - especially when you consider that the no show rate for candidates that book interviews with us is sometimes as high as 50%. We proactively recruit - we're not reactive. That is why we place ads. Sometimes candidates come to our office and the stars are aligned and we have them working the next day. Others we never place. It just depends on our client's needs at any given time and if those needs fit your skills and pay range. There is not advantage for us to spend the money to place ads and interview people that we will never place in jobs. We don't get paid for placing ads. How would we stay in business that way? We get paid once a temporary employee starts an assignment and once the client pays their invoices. Our asset or commodity is our temporary employees and we have to have them available all of the time.
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Old 01-12-2008, 08:17 AM
 
Location: 55 Miles East of Sanity :D
791 posts, read 1,734,613 times
Reputation: 812
Quote:
Originally Posted by lisak64 View Post
The reason we post jobs is that we need people all of the time for different jobs. Our clients expect us to send them resumes of qualified people as soon as they call. And we never know when they're going to call. So I may have a client that calls me one day needing 10 customer service reps and they want resumes by the end of the day. In order to have enough candidates available, we have to always be recruiting - especially when you consider that the no show rate for candidates that book interviews with us is sometimes as high as 50%. We proactively recruit - we're not reactive. That is why we place ads. Sometimes candidates come to our office and the stars are aligned and we have them working the next day. Others we never place. It just depends on our client's needs at any given time and if those needs fit your skills and pay range. There is not advantage for us to spend the money to place ads and interview people that we will never place in jobs. We don't get paid for placing ads. How would we stay in business that way? We get paid once a temporary employee starts an assignment and once the client pays their invoices. Our asset or commodity is our temporary employees and we have to have them available all of the time.
Lisak64,

Thank you for such a great post. It was very informative and I, for one, appreciate you taking the time to educate & enlighten us.

I completely understand your perspective and where you're coming from in terms of the ads and your need to create a 'pool'. However, do you think there'd be a way for the agency to state that they are creating an eligibility list? That way, the applicants will know that they are being considered for future openings, and not immediate placement. I don't know, it just seems to me that there's got to be a happy medium where the agency is getting the people they need, and the applicants aren't getting discouraged.

Regarding your statement that applicants need to honor their committment to the agency and represent them in the best light to their clients, I agreee 200%. Of course, I'm 'Old Skool' and understand the dynamics of job hunting, whereas the younger generations seem less concerned. But I think that's wherein the problem lies. If these youngsters aren't expected to conduct themselves in a professional manner and still get hired, then the employer gets unprofessional performances.

Now, I guess I could go on, just cuz I'm long winded that way, but I suppose the point of the thread has been made. All I know, is that when I've spent HOURS on creating & personalizing 5 different resumes and cover letters, and have researched until I'm ready to collapse, it'd be nice to be afforded a little time & consideration for the time I've invested and the experience, integrity & skill I bring to the table. Because bottom line, a resume is a very poor representation of what a person is actually capable of acheiving. So if an employer wants someone that can type 1000wpm, knows every software program known to mankind, has 5 degrees, speaks 7 languages, etc....don't offer them $5.00 per hour. It's just flat out insulting!!! Yes, I exagerate, but you get the point I'm making. The one thing that everyone needs to remember is that employers aren't perfect, and employees aren't perfect, and the most you can expect is for everyone to do the best they can. But if I'm expected to do the best for my employer, I expect the same in return. Being unappreciated is probably the #1 reason an employee seeks employment elsewhere.

Ok, that's enough for now. Again, thank you very much for bringing up such great points for us to consider. Too often, we don't think about the other person's perspective, and it would be very beneficial if we did....in all things.

High Regards,
Boof
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