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Old 06-16-2016, 04:28 PM
 
328 posts, read 401,069 times
Reputation: 132

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Hi

I'm in a dilemma

I'm looking for jobs to relocate to a certain area. I am frustrated, because only like 1 in 10 jobs say how much will they pay you

I understand that asking about pay in an interview is an automatic disqualifier, so how in heckers, do you find out how much are they willing to pay you before you even waste your time applying?

I know of glass door and websites like it, but they don't always have the pay for every company, and even when they have, it can be very inaccurate

I'm super confused

Thanks in advance
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Old 06-16-2016, 05:07 PM
SQL
 
Location: The State of Delusion - Colorado
1,337 posts, read 959,323 times
Reputation: 1492
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielsard View Post
Hi

I'm in a dilemma

I'm looking for jobs to relocate to a certain area. I am frustrated, because only like 1 in 10 jobs say how much will they pay you

I understand that asking about pay in an interview is an automatic disqualifier, so how in heckers, do you find out how much are they willing to pay you before you even waste your time applying?

I know of glass door and websites like it, but they don't always have the pay for every company, and even when they have, it can be very inaccurate

I'm super confused

Thanks in advance
I gave up on playing that game along time ago. There is no guidebook to reference for this.

Do some research on sites like Glassdoor and get a general idea what a particular position pays. Take into consideration what you are currently making.

If the position is similar to your current job, or a step up from it, I'll usually give them a $10k range, with the lower tier being about $5-$10k more than what I'm currently making.
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Old 06-16-2016, 05:57 PM
 
Location: JobHuntingHacker.com
928 posts, read 958,752 times
Reputation: 1825
What is that you do that makes your pay range and going rate such a mystery? I know how much the range is in my profession and industry and while some companies do come way below that, most are definitely in the range. I just can't comprehend how anyone doesn't know how much is the average pay in their industy for their type of position.
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Old 06-16-2016, 07:10 PM
 
328 posts, read 401,069 times
Reputation: 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Staggerlee666 View Post
What is that you do that makes your pay range and going rate such a mystery? I know how much the range is in my profession and industry and while some companies do come way below that, most are definitely in the range. I just can't comprehend how anyone doesn't know how much is the average pay in their industy for their type of position.
TBH its in most job searches... even those who are obviously minimum wage :/
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Old 06-16-2016, 07:38 PM
SQL
 
Location: The State of Delusion - Colorado
1,337 posts, read 959,323 times
Reputation: 1492
Quote:
Originally Posted by Staggerlee666 View Post
What is that you do that makes your pay range and going rate such a mystery? I know how much the range is in my profession and industry and while some companies do come way below that, most are definitely in the range. I just can't comprehend how anyone doesn't know how much is the average pay in their industy for their type of position.
Maybe if you're in a very niche field. I was a data analyst at my last job making around $60k/yr. I've seen data analyst positions advertise from $9/hr. to over $100k/yr. Companies use job titles interchangeably, even if the positions require different levels of experience and skills. If there was a manual on job salaries, then there'd be no need to negotiate.

Fortunately, my current job's ad had the salary range listed, so I knew what I was working with. They were the only employer to provide that info out of the five employers I've worked for. That info isn't as widely available as one would hope, especially in other fields.
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Old 06-16-2016, 08:17 PM
 
328 posts, read 401,069 times
Reputation: 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by SQL View Post
Maybe if you're in a very niche field. I was a data analyst at my last job making around $60k/yr. I've seen data analyst positions advertise from $9/hr. to over $100k/yr. Companies use job titles interchangeably, even if the positions require different levels of experience and skills. If there was a manual on job salaries, then there'd be no need to negotiate.

Fortunately, my current job's ad had the salary range listed, so I knew what I was working with. They were the only employer to provide that info out of the five employers I've worked for. That info isn't as widely available as one would hope, especially in other fields.
And if you ask, you can forget about being selected for the job most times
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Old 06-16-2016, 08:53 PM
SQL
 
Location: The State of Delusion - Colorado
1,337 posts, read 959,323 times
Reputation: 1492
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielsard View Post
And if you ask, you can forget about being selected for the job most times
I have not found that to be true. You have to be tactful when seeking out that answer. Most of the time, they will ask me what salary I'm looking for, I'll give them my range, and they'll let me know whether my salary requirements fall within their range. That's just the way it works at my companies. They do it, because it acts as leverage on their part. The public sector is far more transparent about pay scales.
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Old 06-17-2016, 06:32 AM
 
486 posts, read 830,398 times
Reputation: 1069
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielsard View Post
Hi

I understand that asking about pay in an interview is an automatic disqualifier, so how in heckers, do you find out how much are they willing to pay you before you even waste your time applying?
Ugh! I just had *this* discussion in my blog. The whole idea that a job applicant cannot/should not/is rude to ask about the salary range during an interview is total crap. Crap, crap, crap.

So one is automatically disqualified if he/she asks the salary range in a job interview (especially if the salary range was not listed on the ad)? Really? That is petty and sad. I wouldn't want to work for any company that hires managers/HR staff who get their noses bent out of shape over a simple question about the salary range for a job that the company is looking to hire. In my world (which I understand is not the same world everone else lives in) everyone I know who has a job, gets paid a salary. No one is working for free. Therefore, if you are interviewing for a job and the interviewer goes on and on about benefits but doesn't mention salary range and then asks if you have any questions I think you have the right to ask "what is the salary range for this position, it was not listed on the ad, and I want to make sure I am within the range before I waste anymore of your time going through the hiring process."

Seems like a logical question that warrants a logical answer from the hiring manager, but I guess instead the hiring manager is supposed to have a hissy fit and automatically disqualify the interviewee based upon some BS idea that an interviewee should never ask about the salary range during an interview. Again, crap.

The easiest way for employers to cut down on the number of resumes they receive for a job opening is to put the pay/salary range in the ad. Simple. Problem solved. The job candidates know the salary range before they apply and the hiring manager doesn't have to get offended during the job interview when a candidate asks them about the salary range. Win-win all around.
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Old 06-17-2016, 06:50 AM
 
Location: The DMV
5,021 posts, read 8,890,251 times
Reputation: 5828
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielsard View Post
Hi

I'm in a dilemma

I'm looking for jobs to relocate to a certain area. I am frustrated, because only like 1 in 10 jobs say how much will they pay you

I understand that asking about pay in an interview is an automatic disqualifier, so how in heckers, do you find out how much are they willing to pay you before you even waste your time applying?

I know of glass door and websites like it, but they don't always have the pay for every company, and even when they have, it can be very inaccurate

I'm super confused

Thanks in advance
You need to expand your research to more than just glassdoor. Are you in an industry that provides salary surveys? There are a number of salary sites you can search for. Just keep in mind not all are accurate. So the larger the sample size you have, the better idea you'll also have. You'll never get a perfect number - but you should at least get an idea of the difference between different locals.

Asking about pay wouldn't automatically disqualify you. It's something that needs to be discussed eventually. But it's all about your approach. Imagine you're scoping contractors to upgrade your kitchen. If the first question out of the contractors mouth is "what's your budget?" - it's likely to turn you off. But you also know that budget/pricing will need to be discussed at some point.

You really need to have some idea of what your market rate is. This will prevent you from underpricing/overpricing yourself. And that's not something you should rely on job posts alone to tell you.
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Old 06-17-2016, 06:54 AM
 
179 posts, read 116,953 times
Reputation: 228
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielsard View Post
And if you ask, you can forget about being selected for the job most times
Why? Really, why? That is so 90's. The interviewers ALWAYS ask "do you have ANY questions?" They don't ask "do you have ANY questions, but don't ask about the pay or your resume will be immediately shredded and you will be ostracized to the island Elba for eternity for your hubris."

I do have a question - what is the pay? Why is that question so taboo?
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