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Old 07-07-2016, 12:48 AM
 
427 posts, read 418,035 times
Reputation: 428

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I worked at a restaurant early this year and I didn't last past the trial week. It was not a good fit for me and I have no idea why I even bothered working there. I was let go after a week, so I don't know if I should admit to being terminated because I was not on the official payroll.

I also walked out on a job this year. I took lunch and never went back. I was only there for a couple weeks. It was barely even a job. I drove my own car delivering packages for Amazon Prime. It felt like delivering pizza but in a warehouse atmosphere. I wasn't even given shifts like I would in a real job and had to compete for shifts on When I Work with a million other worker bees they had on their payroll. I eventually got a letter from them saying I had been terminated for "job abandonment." I had no idea that it was even a "job."

My question is, do I need to say I have been terminated when I worked at these places for such short periods of time that they seem completely inconsequential? I'm obviously not putting these jobs on my resume.

I am trying to be much more picky as to where I apply so I don't get fired or quit suddenly again.
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Old 07-07-2016, 01:07 AM
 
11,159 posts, read 15,328,485 times
Reputation: 16880
In today's advance technological society and free exchange of information along with so many people providing so much information electronically everywhere they go, just about anything and everything is available for the asking including work histories. Applications, resumes, surveys, questionnaires, self provided disclosures are all out there waiting to be plucked from cyberspace by some data broker who services the employment industry.

In the last 5 years, you would not believe how much information is now being provided during a simple pre-interest info checks. Just changing dates on resumes can trigger red flags if the data brokers have copies of all your resumes that show different or conflicting information. When we see differences in employment history dates, its a good sing someone is hiding an employer.

If applying for a position or with a company where they don't do much checking, leaving it off probably won't mater. But if your talking a company with a more robust way of scrutinizing candidates, it could cause them to think twice.
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Old 07-07-2016, 07:03 PM
 
1,193 posts, read 839,480 times
Reputation: 399
It's no way of the interviewer would know unless you put it down on the application so this is something you don't have to worry about. Plus if you make a good enough first impression the person won't care why you left your last job.
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Old 07-08-2016, 02:40 PM
 
Location: NYC
15,918 posts, read 23,676,251 times
Reputation: 24376
Why would you even put those jobs down for experience? Leave them off
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Old 07-08-2016, 05:51 PM
 
1,104 posts, read 728,589 times
Reputation: 1999
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cryinbaby View Post
I worked at a restaurant early this year and I didn't last past the trial week. It was not a good fit for me and I have no idea why I even bothered working there. I was let go after a week, so I don't know if I should admit to being terminated because I was not on the official payroll.
No point in mentioning it. I know it feels bad. But there's good jobs, and bad jobs. Good jobs are the ones you liked and what you want to put on your resume and talk about in interviews. The bad jobs... you weren't working at the time and were on holiday, career break, family emergency, whatever. A week is nothing anyway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cryinbaby View Post
I also walked out on a job this year. I took lunch and never went back. I was only there for a couple weeks. It was barely even a job. I drove my own car delivering packages for Amazon Prime. It felt like delivering pizza but in a warehouse atmosphere. I wasn't even given shifts like I would in a real job and had to compete for shifts on When I Work with a million other worker bees they had on their payroll. I eventually got a letter from them saying I had been terminated for "job abandonment." I had no idea that it was even a "job."
This is at least somewhat salvageable. With a job, you list the things you did in that time period. Perhaps for these two jobs, you could concentrate on the time period. You could put "Casual Worker" and give a rough detail of the responsibilities and work involved of your time at Amazon Prime or the restaurant.

It depends on the new employer - you should tailor your resume, and have more than one resume. Each time, you must be strenuously and stressfully positive about your experience. I know it must seem like smiling to the recruiter when you have just walked out of a plane crash with victims screaming in pain everywhere, but that is how you have to must deal. Well maybe not that bad but still.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cryinbaby View Post
My question is, do I need to say I have been terminated when I worked at these places for such short periods of time that they seem completely inconsequential? I'm obviously not putting these jobs on my resume.
If these were your last jobs then no. Don't bother as the recruiter will expect them as a reference. They wrote you off, they won't sell or mention you in their advertisements or takeovers. Do yourself a favor, don't mention them either. If you want to be pedantic, you most likely failed your trial, initial or probational period as per your contract rather than faced termination (being fired). But you're better off that it never happened.
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Old 07-09-2016, 12:25 AM
 
37 posts, read 23,338 times
Reputation: 63
You only worked their a week, leave it off your resume! I got away of not listing a 6 month position on my resume. I got laid-off as a Business System Analyst at Turner Broadcasting and became a substitute teacher for a major school district while I searched for employment. Six month later I was terminated because the kids watched a Peele and Key video on YouTube that apparently had a lot of curse words. I was terminated because I was accused of not watching them close enough. Anyway I left it off my resume and recently got hired in my field by a major company that hired a very popular 3rd party company to conduct a pre-employment background check. I thought I was screwed but I passed the background check and now happily working for a fortune 50 company in my field!!
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Old 07-09-2016, 02:43 AM
 
273 posts, read 172,352 times
Reputation: 252
Quote:
Originally Posted by dumb View Post
No point in mentioning it. I know it feels bad. But there's good jobs, and bad jobs. Good jobs are the ones you liked and what you want to put on your resume and talk about in interviews. The bad jobs... you weren't working at the time and were on holiday, career break, family emergency, whatever. A week is nothing anyway.
This.

I worked 2 jobs earlier this year. On one, I quit after a week when the employer had unreasonable demands. On the other, I was fired after 2 weeks.

I did not list either of them on my resume and explained the gap on my resume as a family emergency.

With that explanation, I easily got my next job, which is a very good one.

Don't be righteous. They won't find out.
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Old 07-09-2016, 09:36 PM
 
71 posts, read 63,725 times
Reputation: 47
I was made to leave (honorably on paper) a temporary job halfway through the expected term for, long and short, not being very good at it. I had no problem including this information in my application or divulging that I worked there for my next position, which was in the same industry and a better fit. The previous experience counted more as a positive than a negative, and gave me the skills and experience to ask the right questions during the interview.

So, here's my advice from experience - take into account that some better and more coveted positions in a lot of industries (and a lot of the more coveted industries!) are fairly high scrutiny and demand honesty - not to mention that lying or omitting information on your application can be very, very bad for your chances and is seen as a guarantee that you are going to be an unreliable employee - for some positions it will get your application discarded immediately. Being honorable and fessing up if asked is the key to getting a better job and being seen as a reliable and dutiful person.
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