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Old 08-14-2016, 12:20 PM
 
136 posts, read 114,475 times
Reputation: 56

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Hi all!

I have looked through a lot of threads on applying to jobs out of state but I still have some questions hanging.

I am planning to relocate to New York City next year after working at my current job (I am a recent grad and the reason I didn't just move to NY right after graduation is because my housing wasn't set yet and I was still unsure of my options).

A lot of tips sound like they are more gear towards people who are not currently employed. One tip that came up a lot was to put a time frame of when I'm going to move to the area or a date of when I'll be visiting the area for possible job interview. Am I suppose to lie and put a reasonable time frame? It would be ideal get some time before the new job so I can give a two week notice to my current employer.

Also, many tips advised to network on linkedln but never explain how...do I just message/add random people in NY and hope it goes somewhere?

Majority of threads and articles recommended to use a local address or a google voice phone number. I already have housing there so that won't be a problem. But how does that get by? It's obvious that I don't actually live there yet because they can see where I currently work from my job application and resume.

What is your opinion on this?

Thanks in advance!
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Old 08-14-2016, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Whidbey Island, WA
13,819 posts, read 12,031,013 times
Reputation: 6852
It depends on the demand for employees in the industry you work in.
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Old 08-14-2016, 01:18 PM
 
2,673 posts, read 2,407,048 times
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It is easier if you are very experienced or work in a niche field.

Most companies only look outside the state as a very last resort after everything else has failed.
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Old 08-14-2016, 02:27 PM
 
136 posts, read 114,475 times
Reputation: 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by High Altitude View Post
It is easier if you are very experienced or work in a niche field.

Most companies only look outside the state as a very last resort after everything else has failed.
That's very discouraging
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Old 08-14-2016, 03:57 PM
 
Location: Western Washington
10,038 posts, read 9,208,643 times
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I agree with High Altitude. Experience/niche is key.

Relocating to NYC for entry level jobs is particularly tough. I was a hiring level manager in Manhattan for 10 years and I didn't even bother to look at out of town resumes. Everybody wants to work in the city, but the challenges in finding housing and the inevitable culture shock make many people throw in the towel after a very short time.

Unless you are already established in NYC it is an uphill climb. I helped several people get established by letting them couch surf for a couple of weeks, use my address, and generally got them acclimated so that they didn't come across as brand new to the city.
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Old 08-14-2016, 04:00 PM
 
Location: Whidbey Island, WA
13,819 posts, read 12,031,013 times
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What is your area?
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Old 08-14-2016, 07:08 PM
 
136 posts, read 114,475 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fishbrains View Post
I agree with High Altitude. Experience/niche is key.

Relocating to NYC for entry level jobs is particularly tough. I was a hiring level manager in Manhattan for 10 years and I didn't even bother to look at out of town resumes. Everybody wants to work in the city, but the challenges in finding housing and the inevitable culture shock make many people throw in the towel after a very short time.

Unless you are already established in NYC it is an uphill climb. I helped several people get established by letting them couch surf for a couple of weeks, use my address, and generally got them acclimated so that they didn't come across as brand new to the city.

Thanks for the insight. Is that what most hiring managers are worried about?

I am not relocating just for the city life but that is a perk. I actually spent most of my childhood in NYC and all of my family are there. I can guarantee that there will be no culture shock for me. And like I said before, I already have housing secured so that won't be a problem.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AADAD View Post
What is your area?
finance/accounting
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Old 08-14-2016, 07:26 PM
 
Location: Western Washington
10,038 posts, read 9,208,643 times
Reputation: 17578
Quote:
Originally Posted by c114 View Post
Thanks for the insight. Is that what most hiring managers are worried about?

I am not relocating just for the city life but that is a perk. I actually spent most of my childhood in NYC and all of my family are there. I can guarantee that there will be no culture shock for me. And like I said before, I already have housing secured so that won't be a problem.
I can't speak for most managers. I can say that it is a pretty common attitude, and I found it particularly prevalent in NYC.

From a hiring point of view, any hire is a risk. You increase your risk if the candidate is from outside the area, so hiring locally is a big plus.

If you have lived in NY before and have housing, that will be a big plus. Get yourself a Google number with a 646 area code, use your NY address, and tell people in a cover letter that you have returned home to NY after graduating. You need to be able to make interviews without asking for travel $ or requiring several days notice, so if you are outside the tri-state you will encounter problems.
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Old 08-14-2016, 07:29 PM
 
12,010 posts, read 9,415,176 times
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The big hiring season for financial jobs in NYC is roughly Jan. - Apr. Put your local NYC address on your resume. You can explain the rest later if you get called.

On LinkedIn, try to find your alumni group for your school. Post that you are relocating to NYC and you are seeking connections and referrals for finance/acct jobs. Start looking for ex classmates.
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Old 08-15-2016, 07:42 AM
 
1,419 posts, read 1,453,039 times
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if you don't have work experience, i would move to a cheaper state to get the experience (ideally at a big firm) and try NYC in 2-3 years when you'll have solid experience and your background of the area to help with the job.
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