Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment > Job Search
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-01-2009, 06:17 PM
 
16,177 posts, read 32,494,356 times
Reputation: 20592

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Weekend Traveler View Post
One of tasks I do as Human Resources Manager is perform exit interviews on departing employees. I talk to nearly everyone who leaves the company including if possible people who are fired. I like to hear the observations of everyone.

Studies have shown that most managers will fail. It is a lot easier to hold on to a data entry job than a supervisory or management position. When you move into management you have to have unique skills in supervision and influence. Your people skills have to be used to sell ideas, and get people to do things for you that they may disagree with.

In other words most managers have to play office politics. So many people tell me that they will not play office politics and their hard work should stand for itself. That sounds good in theory but unless you have skills in working with people with conflicting needs and approaches and have an abilty to sell your ideas, your career as a manager will be short.

Do you know how to play positive and negative office politics? Tell us how you play the game?
Sorry, but I think that your theory is a crock that most managers will fail. Please supply me the link to your evidence or published literature. It may be true for your one little place but it is not true of most places. Office politics and people skills are two totally different things. They can be tied, for sure, but they are still two different things.

HR Directors help set the tone. If the culture is not changeable, or it is too big a task, the smart HR folks get out while the getting is good. They don't stick around for the blood bath. Because, they know, no one is immune.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-01-2009, 06:57 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
13,714 posts, read 31,173,187 times
Reputation: 9270
Office politics are really about understanding who has power and how they got it. I think it is a bad thing when politics is what really makes the company tick. But it is not at all a bad thing to understand what the people in power need or want. Isn't this really about learning how to work with your coworkers and your management? Unless a company were programmed like software it will always have unpredictable changes simply because human beings are each different.

So an employee that wants to succeed needs to learn how to be recognized for their contributions. It may not happen simply because the employee just works hard.

Managers will always have favorites of varying degrees. It could be the employees that just work the way the manager wants. Or the employees that don't whine all the time. Hopefully it isn't based on prejudice or racism.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-02-2009, 08:16 AM
 
1,831 posts, read 4,435,039 times
Reputation: 1262
Quote:
Originally Posted by DennyCrane View Post
Most people are not cut out for management jobs, even though they think are. I've had managers who were smart, but never motivated me to want to do my best work for them. I've had other managers who weren't nearly as smart as they thought they were and would often feel threatened by someone who had a better idea. I've also seen managers who showed favoritism. And I've had managers who just didn't have the temperament required. Instead of staying calm in a crisis, they let themselves get worked up and that just created tension for the entire team.

But when I think of office politics, I don't think of the people skills that managers must employ to get things done. I think of the alliances and conflicts that actually impede goals from being achieved. Examples include the manager who always favors the idea of his friend instead of just picking the best idea or the manager who doesn't get along with another department head and tries to make him look bad, even when it's at the expense of his company's goals. So I think when people tell you they don't want to play office politics, what they really mean is they don't want to stab people in the back, lie, or waste a lot of time selling their ideas when it's clear the audience has a hidden agenda.
I totally agree with this. I also think there are two types of office politics. One is the type that the OP was referring to -- building alliances, having people skills, being savvy about building relationships and gaining recognition. And the other is the negative crap that people participate in to achieve two goals -- recognition for themselves and bad reputations for others. I always wondered how really negative, backstabbing people become so popular in the workplace.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-02-2009, 04:21 PM
 
Location: New York City
1,556 posts, read 3,547,902 times
Reputation: 944
I can relate to many of the statements on this topic. I transferred from the headquarter office of a company in NYC to a MUCH smaller office/manufacturing facility in South Carolina. The fact that I stayed clear of the gossipy southern culture in that office and just came in to the office, did my work and went home was a problem for them. They were actually offended and took it personally. The manager actually told me in his office one day that I was the one with the problem because I needed to learn how to play the office politics game!! I truly believe the office politics are worse depending on what area of the country you are working in.

For example here in the southern states the politics game seems to be worse. They act like they are trying to be friendly with you calling it the southern way (southern hospitality) when really the motive is that they want to find out your business so they will have something to gossip about!! Another thing that made the office politics so bad where I was working is the fact that the office is located in a small town. Everyone in the office is either related to eachother or grew up together!! By the way feel this is another thing that employers should put a stop to. Husbands/wives, sisters/brothers all working in the same office!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-02-2009, 06:09 PM
 
359 posts, read 1,197,612 times
Reputation: 176
This is why I will NEVER IN A MILLION YEARS be a manager for ANY company ANY-WHERE. I don't do office politics nor will I ever put up with that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-02-2009, 08:57 PM
 
989 posts, read 1,877,142 times
Reputation: 1623
Quote:
Originally Posted by Weekend Traveler View Post
One of tasks I do as Human Resources Manager is perform exit interviews on departing employees. I talk to nearly everyone who leaves the company including if possible people who are fired. I like to hear the observations of everyone.

Studies have shown that most managers will fail. It is a lot easier to hold on to a data entry job than a supervisory or management position. When you move into management you have to have unique skills in supervision and influence. Your people skills have to be used to sell ideas, and get people to do things for you that they may disagree with.

In other words most managers have to play office politics. So many people tell me that they will not play office politics and their hard work should stand for itself. That sounds good in theory but unless you have skills in working with people with conflicting needs and approaches and have an abilty to sell your ideas, your career as a manager will be short.

Do you know how to play positive and negative office politics? Tell us how you play the game?

If a fired employee told me "I don't play politics" at the exit interview; I would make sure that building security is on high alert for a while after he/she leaves. This sounds like one of those horror stories you see on the evening news. You know the type. The fired employee who comes back with a gun to settle scores with some office employees.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-02-2009, 09:34 PM
 
13,811 posts, read 27,448,042 times
Reputation: 14250
Quote:
Originally Posted by zz4guy View Post
You can do that for a while. Or in certain jobs like data entry. But your skills are replacable. After 5 years of giving you a raise they realize they can give the same job to a college grad for much less money.

Office politics suck. Especially in a large corporation. Ugh. I have to deal with it every day. But it is a way of life.

They could but fortunately we're union so they can't fire me without just cause. And if they did it would cost $25k-$30k to put someone thru training to replace me. If they lay off they have to do it from the bottom up. I am more worried about the economy and the price of oil at this point.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-03-2009, 07:25 PM
 
Location: SC
1,141 posts, read 3,545,600 times
Reputation: 642
Quote:
Originally Posted by DennyCrane View Post
I used to do this. But I realized that it pays to cultivate friendships at work. When times are tough and they're trying to decide who to lay off or who to blame for something gone wrong, you need people to back you up. If you're the type who just puts his head down and does his work, you'll be all alone during the bad times.
Not necessarily true. This is me. I put my head down and do my work.
I do not gossip, socialize, rip off my employer, play on the net, do personal phone calls or take extended lunches.

I might add my co workers are all in their 20's (I'm 57). However I like the young folks, and do talk with them, on breaks etc.

By putting my head down and doing my job, I outperformed all of them.
I got a "perfect" rating on my review. The first perfect rating my boss ever gave out (least that is what he said) I got a higher raise, and I got a bonus check.

So yeah, sometimes (depending on the job mind you) putting your head down doing your work, doing it right the first time, opening up more time for one to ask their boss for another challenge works.

It did for me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-03-2009, 07:28 PM
 
Location: southern california
61,288 posts, read 87,413,299 times
Reputation: 55562
its a crooked ugly mean underhanded game. EEOC is probably the most abused game tool in the deck. the accusations dont have to be true, they just have to be made to have a career effect.
i know right now of one manager who has been fired 3 times in 2 years very smart but wont "play games".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-03-2009, 07:30 PM
 
Location: SC
1,141 posts, read 3,545,600 times
Reputation: 642
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewYorkBorn View Post
I can relate to many of the statements on this topic. I transferred from the headquarter office of a company in NYC to a MUCH smaller office/manufacturing facility in South Carolina. The fact that I stayed clear of the gossipy southern culture in that office and just came in to the office, did my work and went home was a problem for them. They were actually offended and took it personally. The manager actually told me in his office one day that I was the one with the problem because I needed to learn how to play the office politics game!! I truly believe the office politics are worse depending on what area of the country you are working in.

For example here in the southern states the politics game seems to be worse. They act like they are trying to be friendly with you calling it the southern way (southern hospitality) when really the motive is that they want to find out your business so they will have something to gossip about!! Another thing that made the office politics so bad where I was working is the fact that the office is located in a small town. Everyone in the office is either related to eachother or grew up together!! By the way feel this is another thing that employers should put a stop to. Husbands/wives, sisters/brothers all working in the same office!
I feel your pain on the Southern thing. I found this to be especially true on my first job in NC. Small company. However I quit (like walked out the door quit) and found another job at a big huge company...major difference.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment > Job Search

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:59 AM.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top