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Old 02-08-2018, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Riley Co
300 posts, read 262,162 times
Reputation: 369

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according to the latest numbers from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

https://www.bls.gov/news.release/metro.nr0.htm

Here’s a look at the 12-month average growth rates for each of the metro areas, which include the Kansas and Missouri side of Kansas City.

— Kansas City: up 1.9 percent

— Topeka: up 1.2 percent

— Lawrence: up 0.8 percent

— Manhattan: up 0.8 percent

— Wichita: up 0.6 percent


For whatever reason, though, the state’s two big college communities — Lawrence and Manhattan — both suffered slowdowns in the last part of the year. Like Lawrence, Manhattan has posted declines since September, according to the preliminary numbers. In fact, the declines in Manhattan have been even more pronounced. In December, Manhattan posted a 2 percent job decline compared to Lawrence’s 0.2 percent dip.


New numbers show Lawrence added jobs in 2017, but failed to keep pace with Kansas City, Topeka | Town Talk / LJWorld.com
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Old 02-08-2018, 03:47 PM
 
Location: Riley Co
300 posts, read 262,162 times
Reputation: 369
Default Nbaf surely not to blame?

I've been expecting to see some visible sign that the NBAF & its spew-offs were a driving force in the economy of Manhattan. Since actual construction began, the only impact I've seen has been a group of ~ 8 guys + supervisor dining @ The Early Edition's 3210 Kimball Ave location. They all wear bright orange t-shirts with Nbaf Lab Joint Venture on the sleeves. Some also wear US Engineering logo ball caps. I noticed that they were discussing job opportunities @ Ft. Riley housing (solar panels installation for base housing).

US Engineering-Mann Mechanical Nbaf Lab Joint Venture is located in Kansas City, Missouri. This organization primarily operates in the Mechanical Contractor business / industry within the Construction - Special Trade Contractors sector. This organization has been operating for approximately 2 years. US Engineering-Mann Mechanical Nbaf Lab Joint Venture is estimated to generate $177,734 in annual revenues, and employs approximately 5 people at this single location (KCMO).

http://www.buzzfile.com/business/US-...e-816-753-6969

I've spoken with a co-owner of F&L Construction, Inc., a Behlen™ steel building provider in Wamego, regarding the NBAF construction "opportunities." KSU held an infotainment meeting for prospective bidders. Seems DHS required all contractors to operate with a "software" package costing way more than any local construction biz would care to invest in.

I'd expected the NBAF to utilize the same Top Secret - Sensitive Compartmented Information security levels for construction as the new "campus" for the USAMRIID:

WSP USA, as part of the Prime A/E team, provided architectural and engineering design services for a new replacement facility for the U.S. Biological Defense Research program’s lead facility U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID) at Fort Detrick. Our firm was responsible for the High Containment Laboratories (BSL4, BSL3E Imaging and Aerobiology), Clinic and Logistics areas providing planning, architectural and mechanical engineering services.

The process included site investigation, planning, programming, and engineering studies including biowaste study, design charettes, etc. The project includes new biomedical research and vivarium facilities; housing spaces for BSL4, BLS3, BSL2 Research; BSL4, BLS3, BSL2 Repository; BSL4, BLS3, BSL2 Transgenics; Emergents BSL4, BSL4 and BSL3 Aerobiology; Pathogenesis' Vaccine Research; Diagnostics; Host Responses; Special BSL4 In-patient Triage Suite; Therapeutics; Advanced Imaging; Bioinformatics; Genomics; Proteomics; Biopharmaceutical Development; Animal BSL4, BLS3, BSL2 Animal Research; Animal Holding for various species including non-human primates; and administrative and support space. Support facilities include medical gas utilities, conventional utilities, effluent steam sterilization, fire protection, and information systems.

The project will also include decommissioning, decontamination and demolition of the existing facilities. Construction phase services in addition to shop drawing review and approval, technical assistance, and commissioning, include full-time on-site personnel to provide daily interaction with the construction team. The new facilities will replace the outdated and crowded existing USAMRIID facilities and provide a new 930,000 gross square foot facility including state-of-the-art biocontainment laboratory space, animal facilities, and administrative offices, as well as operational and administrative support facilities.


Special BSL4 In-patient Triage Suite => that's a must-have when you've mistakenly pricked your finger with a BSL-4 pathogen, as there is no known cure. The closest BSL4 In-patient rooms are in Omaha, and as you'll remember, it was maxed out with 3 Ebola patients a few years back.

effluent steam sterilization => the NBAF plans indicate 3 "digesters" capable of holding an entire beef carcass down in the basement, with room for 3 more!

I'd also spoken with a plumber, who has a friend working @ the NBAF; yes, he did have to get a TS-SCI clearance, that's all the friend would say.

When the NBAF was proposed for KSU, Wefald put out the word not to comment other than in a positive way. There was ONE LTE of The Manhattan Mercury by a KSU scientist against the NBAF. Speaking to him later, he was unaware the ANTHRAX MAILERS enablers were the KSU colonels behind the push. He has govt contracts >$1 million.

I know one microbiologist Ph.D. who was hired to instruct the BRI's "researchers" in aseptic microbial techniques; as those initially hired were inept. This may be one cause for the DHS's "secret sanctions." She had a policy of remaining silent on the BRI, as her spouse was still on the Vet Med faculty.

There is a rumor that many profs & others will leave KSU prior to the NBAF becoming operational (2023). I know nothing about Chief of Staff Jackie Hartman's retirement. But having your "home" ask you to fill out a investigative form for a TS-SCI isn't a morale booster, I would imagine.

When Hartman came to K-State in 2010, she was returning home. She earned both her bachelor's and master's degrees from K-State, and served as an instructor of management at the university from 1981-1986. Her Wildcat roots run deep as she is the daughter of Pat and Jack Hartman, the legendary basketball coach who led K-State to three Big Eight titles, two Big Eight Tourney titles and nine postseason appearances.

https://www.k-state.edu/media/newsre...rtman1418.html


It could be that KSU-Vet is purging its large animal profs. Several former USAMRIID military have joined the Vet School faculty in recent years. Perhaps to gain favor for a NBAF research post.

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, nationally in 2010 - the most recent year for which statistics are available - about 6 percent of veterinarians specialized in equine veterinary medicine, about 8 percent practiced exclusively or predominantly on food animals, and another 7 percent had mixed-animal practices. By contrast, two-thirds of the nation's veterinarians in 2010 were practicing exclusively on companion animals (dogs, cats and other small animals). The trend toward small-animal practices is believed to have continued, as increasing numbers of vet school graduates opt for more lucrative pet practices to pay off six-figure student loans sooner.

https://www.ksl.com/?sid=35115398
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Old 02-08-2018, 10:10 PM
 
59,293 posts, read 46,352,704 times
Reputation: 36781
If you want to compare the massively lower growth rate of 0.8% to the much lower 0.8% from you first post then that's um...ok by me.

But I'll be honest, if this were NOT an anonymous forum, I wouldn't say the following. I mean no offense, I'm actually just concerned. (And if it was public I'd just whistle and walk on by as I wouldn't want anyone showing up on my doorstep with a shotgun as a euphamism...or not.)

Your posts seem irrational, bitter and erratic. I hope they are the byproduct of a few too many on some days, I myself have been guilty of that. I too have been screwed over by former employers....but I wonder if you've had any sort of medical check-up recently?

All the best, wishing you a happy and healthy 2018.
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Old 02-08-2018, 11:12 PM
 
Location: Riley Co
300 posts, read 262,162 times
Reputation: 369
Default Mathguy makes too many math errors?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mathguy View Post
If you want to compare the massively lower growth rate of 0.8% to the much lower 0.8% from you first post then that's um...ok by me.

But I'll be honest, if this were NOT an anonymous forum, I wouldn't say the following. I mean no offense, I'm actually just concerned. (And if it was public I'd just whistle and walk on by as I wouldn't want anyone showing up on my doorstep with a shotgun as a euphamism...or not.)

Your posts seem irrational, bitter and erratic. I hope they are the byproduct of a few too many on some days, I myself have been guilty of that. I too have been screwed over by former employers....but I wonder if you've had any sort of medical check-up recently?

All the best, wishing you a happy and healthy 2018.
Are you still perusing C-D forum on your smart phone? Your post seem to be based upon errors in reading numbers, not exactly endorsement for your moniker "Mathguy."

No, I'm comparing the LJworld statement:

Like Lawrence, Manhattan has posted declines since September, according to the preliminary numbers. In fact, the declines in Manhattan have been even more pronounced. In December, Manhattan posted a 2 percent job decline compared to Lawrence’s 0.2 percent dip.


Your error on my comment about KS having the least # of threads of any state, when you mistook KS threads #s & compared them to other states' post #s, comes to mind.

I believe you've stated that you have worked for KSU? I think maybe you have business loyalties that warp your reading comprehension. That's fine. I do not have any allegiance to KSU; and have witnessed too many lies put out by them.
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Old 02-09-2018, 02:24 AM
 
Location: Riley Co
300 posts, read 262,162 times
Reputation: 369
Default Mathguy, would you care to guess where my water well is?

My neighborhood is ~ 0.5 miles N. of where 1,4-dioxane was discovered outside the fenced enclosure in a drainage creek on campus that flows toward the northeast and contributes to the Big Blue River several miles away. We rely on well water. The closest "test well" is ~ a stone's throw from the nearest water well. None of our wells were tested! We began to wonder why what looked like septic clean outs were spaced across the barren crop field. Several months later, we read about it in the Capital-Journal.

It is my understanding the toxic dump cleanup was a demand of the new KSU president, Kirk Schulz, as a condition of accepting the appointment. (On February 11, 2009, the Kansas Board of Regents announced that Schulz was selected as the thirteenth president of Kansas State University.)

KSU to clean toxic landfill
By Tim Carpenter (Topeka Capital Journal)

Posted Sep 22, 2010 at 4:02 PM

MANHATTAN — Faculty and staff members at Kansas State University for a quarter-century dumped boxes, buckets and barrels of low-level radioactive waste into trenches in a pasture on the north side of campus.

As many as 175 chemicals of varying concentration and toxicity were tossed into the university’s landfill cocktail.

“Whatever people had to pack things in,” Steven Galitzer, director of the Department of Environmental Health and Safety at K-State, said in an interview Wednesday.

Remediation of soil and groundwater contamination linked to the landfill’s contents may cost the university $4 million.

Tritium, carbon-14 and other radioactive elements were placed into the “Atomic Waste Burial Plot” adjacent to the Wildcats’ football stadium from 1961 to 1987, according to a consultant’s report prepared for K-State and submitted to the Kansas Department of Health and Environment in August.

Acids, solvents and other hazardous chemical waste, including the carcinogen 1,4-dioxane that blends easily with water, were added to the landfill during an undetermined period of years that ended in the 1980s.

Buried under tons of dirt and topped by a metal building, toxins packed into the pits were out of sight but not completely out of mind for public safety administrators on the Manhattan campus. Over the years, university officials concluded techniques once thought proper for handling scientific and occupational waste no longer held up to modern standards enforced by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

“Back in the day, they told you to bury them,” Galitzer said. “We’re finding out it was less than OK. I wish we had never started.”

The landfill was closed in 1987, and testing for the spread of pollutants was initiated in 1990. Water samples from 31 test wells bored 20, 40 and 60 feet beneath the surface indicate toxins are migrating underground. The radioactive tritium was detected in groundwater collected from a monitoring well close to the landfill. The 1,4-dioxane was discovered outside the fenced enclosure in a drainage creek on campus that flows toward the northeast and contributes to the Big Blue River several miles away.

Kelly Phillips, hazardous waste manager in the university’s environmental health and safety department, said none of the leeching had carried harmful substances off K-State property. She is convinced no drinking water supply has been compromised by the plume.

No above-ground contamination has been detected in 20 years of testing at what is now referred to as the “Old Chemical Waste Landfill,” Galitzer said.

The university’s plan is to spend as much as $4 million on the clean-up project. Intercepting and treating tainted water in the underground plume is to begin by the end of 2010. A 100-foot-long trench to capture corrupted groundwater and construction of the treatment unit could cost $300,000. Additional ground testing is to begin in July 2011.

Workers in hazardous materials suits are expected to start digging, sorting and hauling away contents of the landfill in January 2012, a maneuver expected to cost $3.7 million. Some of the material will go to Idaho. The site could be released by KDHE and EPA for closure in April 2013 following a final assessment of remaining soil at the landfill. Upon completion of the project, the site will be covered with dirt.

Bruce Shubert, a K-State vice president for finance and administration, said bonds would be issued to finance the project. The university’s share of faculty research grants, a category known as overhead, may be drawn upon to cover the debt.

The annual cost to K-State of monitoring the landfill site is about $300,000 and likely would increase in the future, university records show. Those documents also indicate the EPA and KDHE support the university’s decision to seek a permanent solution by removing the landfill.

“It’s time to get it cleaned up for good,” Galitzer said.

Many U.S. research universities developed landfills in the 1960s to bury materials considered inappropriate for regular trash collection, Galitzer said. K-State followed all government regulations regarding hazardous and radioactive waste disposal while operating the landfill, he said.

He said K-State had a record of radioactive waste buried at the site, but it only had a general idea of the types of chemical waste in the ground.

“There weren’t very good records kept,” Galitzer said. “It wasn’t required.”

A KDHE report produced in 1999 indicated there were at least 18 trenches at the campus landfill ranging from 8 to 15 feet in depth, 4 feet wide and 15 feet long. Each pile of waste likely has 4 feet of dirt on top. The report says items were buried in plastic and metal garbage cans, cardboard boxes, buckets and tubes.

Galitzer said none of the radioactive waste buried at the landfill north of Kimball Avenue and west of a tall grain science facility came from K-State’s small nuclear reactor used for research and teaching.

University staff members now subject laboratory chemical waste and occupational debris from cleaning and maintenance activities to screening before being placed in treatment storage or transferred off campus to a disposal facility, he said.

KSU to clean toxic landfill - News - The Topeka Capital-Journal - Topeka, KS
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Old 02-09-2018, 01:19 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
29,154 posts, read 28,185,732 times
Reputation: 36758
Billy Idol anyone?
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Old 02-11-2018, 02:41 AM
 
4,673 posts, read 3,065,926 times
Reputation: 3399
Your post is pretty misleading. Neither city lost jobs by the conventional standards of annual reports. They gained the same amount of jobs for 2017.

As far as the 19 year old article on the landfill toxins... at least they cleaned it up and did ground water tests. Water treatment plants constantly check for all types of chemicals and toxins, we actually get an annual report on our water quality mailed to our homes where I live, not sure if they do that in Manhattan.
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Old 02-11-2018, 04:21 AM
 
Location: Riley Co
300 posts, read 262,162 times
Reputation: 369
Default Take off your KSU Blinders

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattks View Post
Your post is pretty misleading. Neither city lost jobs by the conventional standards of annual reports. They gained the same amount of jobs for 2017.

As far as the 19 year old article on the landfill toxins... at least they cleaned it up and did ground water tests. Water treatment plants constantly check for all types of chemicals and toxins, we actually get an annual report on our water quality mailed to our homes where I live, not sure if they do that in Manhattan.

Misleading? The article is NOT YET 18 YEARS OLD, (math error on your part). IF you read the LJWorld on-line, like I do every day (NOTE: you can read full articles unlimited times per month without subscription), you would know that editor Chad Lawhorn regularly reports on how Lawrence fairs in government statistics, 10-best lists, etc. which mention Lawrence. And you can bet a Jayhawk that every opportunity to compare Lawrence's vastly superior position over Manhattan is always trumpeted.

They gained the same amount of jobs for 2017. NO, THEY GAINED THE SAME PERCENTAGE !!!!

As for KDHE, I suppose you've forgotten about KDHE's collusion with Sunflower Electric & approval of expansion of the Holcomb Plant?

a June 2011 report in the "Kansas City Star" that detailed a "cozy relationship" Sunflower enjoyed with KDHE during the permitting process. The newspaper analyzed hundreds of emails that revealed that Sunflower was allowed inappropriate influence over the permitting procedure and was allowed to draft responses to public comments for KDHE and influence the terms of its own permit, among other things. The emails obtained by the newspaper were not initially submitted to the Court by KDHE.


https://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php/Holcomb_Expansion

The 1,4-dioxane was discovered outside the fenced enclosure in a drainage creek on campus that flows toward the northeast and contributes to the Big Blue River several miles away.


Read that again, for reading comprehension sake, it says The 1,4-dioxane was discovered outside the fenced enclosure in a drainage creek

IN SURFACE WATER, not some test well. That "creek" (it's actually pretty intermittent, but when it rains it fills up, backs across under College Ave & across KSU's agronomy field & previously onto the KSU 40 acres now occupied by Via Christi Village.

Any competent hydrologist can tell you that such "test wells" may be less than adequate to trace "plumes" of hazardous chemicals in Karst Topography

A landscape that is characterized by numerous caves, sinkholes, fissures, and underground streams. Karst topography usually forms in regions of plentiful rainfall where bedrock consists of carbonate-rich rock, such as limestone, gypsum, or dolomite, that is easily dissolved.

I've visited the Ozark Underground Laboratory twice with Dr. Donald Distler's WSU classes:

The Ozark Underground Laboratory, Inc. (OUL) is a groundwater consulting firm that provides a wide range of hydrogeological services. We have been in fulltime operation since 1973 and have worked in 40 states,
2 territories, and 13 countries. We specialize in the subsurface migration of pollutants in karst and fractured rock landscapes in hydrologically and politically sensitive areas.

OUL Services

Those test wells run from the KSU toxic dump in a straight line to the N, ~ 1/8 mile E of College Avenue; come over & see for yourself.

Water treatment plants AGAIN, for READING COMPREHENSION's sake, I stated We rely on well water. As does our entire neighborhood.


Kelly Phillips, hazardous waste manager in the university’s environmental health and safety department, said none of the leeching had carried harmful substances off K-State property. She is convinced no drinking water supply has been compromised by the plume.

Ms. Phillips is the wife of Craig Phillips, chief of the Conservation and Restoration Branch at Fort Riley, Kan. She was previously a contractor employee under his supervion, but as his wife, she couldn't continue working for the Ft. Riley contractor, so KSU found a spot for her. I don't particularly put my trust in her confidence, as her test results are based upon a straight S>N line of test wells; inadequate in Karst topography.

KSU FAN BOYS NOTE: when you wear Wildcat Blinders, you see what KSU wants you to see; your reading comprehension is (evidently) severely limited; and you attempt to discredit anyone with an opposing viewpoint.
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Old 02-11-2018, 09:40 AM
 
4,673 posts, read 3,065,926 times
Reputation: 3399
You got me. 18 years, not 19 years. Yes, they gained the same percentage of jobs is exactly I what meant, and that makes your title and the actual premise of your thread misleading, before you went off the rails bashing everything else about the town you obviously hate.

I have little to no opinion of KSU and don’t care about the wildcats. By saying that, you are attempting to discredit without knowing anything about me.

If you are so worried about your water quality and don’t trust the state to perform that job, why don’t you test it yourself, it’s not hard or expensive. I suppose it’s easier to just complain for the next couple decades.

I’m never going to read everything your write or every link you post, who has that much time. Most of it’s just angry nonsense.
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Old 02-12-2018, 12:48 AM
 
Location: Riley Co
300 posts, read 262,162 times
Reputation: 369
WE DID HAVE OUR WATER TESTED, was AOK. I don't know about every other house in our neighborhood.

I asked my wife today (previously a contaminants biologist for USF&WS) if KDHE mentioned anything about Karst topography at the public meeting she attended on KSU's toxic pit. NO.

IF you'd read propaganda on the front page of your newspaper like I did, you'd probably be angry too. We had intended to live the remainder of our lives @ this house. Now 2023 is our date to get out of here by. How bad was the propaganda: The day after KSU Biology prof's LTE printed, Editorial "farmers & ranchers have reason to be concerned by NBAF, others do not." LTEs were sent to KSU, where the former reporter scrambled to get someone to write a rebuttal, which would appear as an article on the front page the day the LTE was printed. The editor, Felber, showed up @ the first No NBAF in KS meeting @ the Senior Center, then wrote an article that speakers didn't know a BSL-3 disease, from a BSL-4. I was in attendance, but it wasn't my place to correct speakers as they let off steam, or simply simmered.

The NBAF was presented @ KSU's public info meeting as an opportunity for students to observe & work with scientists. No mention of any need for security/safety. It's not nonsense to be alarmed about an animal pathogen =>human DURC lab in the middle of KS. The DHS Environmental Impact Statement says it will cost ~ $5billion (2008) to cull herds within 250 miles IF Foot & Mouth Disease is released. DHS claimed a <0.10 % change of a release; National Academy of Sciences figured 70% over the 50-year lifespan What do you think will happen to beef exports?

My ancestors brought the first steam-powered thresher W of the Mississippi to Sumner Co, KS, in the 1880s. When my great-grandfather passed in 1939, there were 104 teams in the funeral procession. I fear what the NBAF will one day bring to KS.

My postings around the WWW won't seem like nonsense when Googled following a release.

Here's a book on the NBAF, KSU is covered. I spoke with Mr. King after a showing of this movie:

https://www.amazon.com/Germs-Gone-Wi.../dp/1605981001


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PquqlX8wnT0
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