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Old 09-11-2006, 03:18 PM
 
43 posts, read 194,097 times
Reputation: 46

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There's also what we jokingly refer to as "moist" counties. That means restricted sales - usually only in restaurants that can seat 100 or more and has 70% of sales from food. That, however, can vary and restrictions are voted on when the ref is on tha ballot. Because it is rare here to find a privately owned restaurant that has 100 seats, nearly all the places serving by-the-drink are national chains (Applebee's, etc.)

The county I live in is officially dry and the one I work in recently became "moist." As someone said above, it doesn't mean no one drinks by a long shot. I can't disagree with anything she said about the number of alcohol (and drug) related crimes. All you have to do is read the police blotter in the paper to see it. It just means people drive up to a "wet" county and stock up.

KY has 120 counties. Last numbers I saw, 70% were dry, including quite a few where bourbon is made.
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Old 09-13-2006, 05:35 PM
 
1 posts, read 5,874 times
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Angry Dry county means

It means you can't buy anthing with alchol. No bars no places to buy anything with alchol. Its a pain I have to drive for at least 2 hours for any my self:mad
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Old 07-01-2010, 02:49 PM
 
Location: Louisville,KY
1 posts, read 4,881 times
Reputation: 10
I was in Spencer County ( in Kentucky), on Taylorsville Lake. I was not aware that it was a dry state, considering I had never been there before. Which in a way,I guess,does not matter considering Im only 19. Well, I got caught. The officer did NOT take me to jail, nor did they take my cooler full of beer. He gave me a ticket with the charge of "Posession of alcohol by Minor". and i now have a court date. Ive been researching and cannot find anything on to WHAT charges I could be facing. Does anyone know?? I know I will be facing the possession of alcohol by minor charge, but will I have ANOTHER charge for bringing alcohol into a dry county?
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Old 07-01-2010, 08:44 PM
 
Location: Mt. Washington, KY
171 posts, read 340,534 times
Reputation: 43
Funny thing is, many "dry" counties have some great distilleries in them. Kentucky is full of irony.

Kaliit, if you want the name of an attorney that is good and relatively cheap let me know. I'm not related to him nor do I know him other than I've used him on a few occasions and I'm very satisfied with his work.
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Old 07-02-2010, 04:34 AM
 
Location: Arlington, VA —> North Carolina in October
24,651 posts, read 35,071,108 times
Reputation: 34476
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaliit View Post
I was in Spencer County ( in Kentucky), on Taylorsville Lake. I was not aware that it was a dry state, considering I had never been there before. Which in a way,I guess,does not matter considering Im only 19. Well, I got caught. The officer did NOT take me to jail, nor did they take my cooler full of beer. He gave me a ticket with the charge of "Posession of alcohol by Minor". and i now have a court date. Ive been researching and cannot find anything on to WHAT charges I could be facing. Does anyone know?? I know I will be facing the possession of alcohol by minor charge, but will I have ANOTHER charge for bringing alcohol into a dry county?
The way I'm hearing the law, it would only be a charge if you were intending to sell the beer not just consume it.
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Old 07-02-2010, 09:41 AM
 
Location: E ND & NW MN
4,817 posts, read 9,760,650 times
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I grew up in Hopkins county KY (Madisonville) which was dry at the time I was there in the 70s thru the early 90s. From my understanding and after hearing about local police busts at fraternal clubs and such....It is not illegal to possess alcohol in a dry county just illegal to purchase it and then re-sell it. I knew of folks who would drive to Christian county KY which was/is wet and drive back home to a dry county just to purchase alcohol for personal consumption. No law against that if you are of age.

So only charge for you would be minor in possession. Certainly I am not a lawyer though so you should triple check.

Dan
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Old 07-03-2010, 07:07 AM
Status: "Love being retired!" (set 11 days ago)
 
Location: In the Pearl of the Purchase, Ky
8,169 posts, read 13,641,844 times
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When I was under 21, besides a court date, the police officer who stopped you would stand there while you opened and poured out every single can you had in the cooler.
Another friend had a heartbreaking time. This was back when you couldn't buy Coors beer east of Kansas City. An 18 yr old friend wanted some for a big party and actually drove from around Paducah, Ky. to Kansas City and bought, somehow, 15 cases. Got pulled over for speeding on the interstate before he got back to St.Louis. He said the trooper had him put every single case of beer into the trooper's car and let him off with a warning for the minor in possession, but a speeding ticket. Said he sat in his car and cried for 10 minutes after he watched all his Coor's ride off in the police car. lol
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Old 07-11-2010, 08:15 PM
 
174 posts, read 337,227 times
Reputation: 156
I lived in a dry county in western KY. The next county over was wet. All it means is that the dry county loses the tax revenue. Oh ya, It also ment that I had to clean wiskey bottles, beer bottles, and beer can out of my ditch every week just before I would mow. They would throw it out the window on the way back to the dry county. It does'nt change a thing for the dry county. It just put more people behind the wheel that drink.
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Old 07-13-2010, 11:01 PM
 
1,253 posts, read 3,184,740 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snapper54 View Post
I lived in a dry county in western KY. The next county over was wet. All it means is that the dry county loses the tax revenue. Oh ya, It also ment that I had to clean wiskey bottles, beer bottles, and beer can out of my ditch every week just before I would mow. They would throw it out the window on the way back to the dry county. It does'nt change a thing for the dry county. It just put more people behind the wheel that drink.
It is quite stupid when you think about it. Many rural Kentuckians think in small terms & that their little county is somehow shielded from the "evils" of the dreaded alcohol because of a county line. When in fact, all anyone has to so is drive less than 20 mins to get some. So all it does is make those dry counties lose potential revenue from straight sales in stores, restaurants, etc. But they'll smoke like freight trains & eat like crap (which kills tons more people). So how does that make sense??

Its a form of mini-prohibition, which history shows us NEVER works. Actually makes it worse because because people have to go to greater lengths to get it, or turn to something else, like prescription meds (which are usually rampant in these areas). Proof is in the pudding, folks. It simply doesnt work & is jut a way for some self-righteous people to feel like they're in control.

Same with marijuana. Prohibition of a mostly-harmless plant has pushed it into a black market trade which in fact makes it many many times worse than the actually drug itself is. Thankfully, many states are starting to realize this & legalize it. If Kentuckians had any sense, they'd do the same as it could be a huge cash crop for the state & help them out in a lot of ways. Good luck getting it past the holy rollers though. That and sticking to old traditions (like strip mining) & not open to other forms of industry will sadly be the death of a lot of these areas. Potential is there, just not being capitalized on.
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Old 07-14-2010, 08:38 PM
 
Location: NOVA
4,521 posts, read 5,469,264 times
Reputation: 1938
Lightbulb Dry county Link

This thread describes the dry counties and how most states still have a dry city or county today.

//www.city-data.com/forum/kentu...-counties.html



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dry_county

Map of counties in Kentucky, by county:
http://www.abc.ky.gov/NR/rdonlyres/B421E415-92EF-4F8C-AFC8-4EBE5F8DCF86/0/WetDryMap4110.pdf (broken link)
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