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Old 07-22-2013, 01:01 AM
 
Location: SW of Muncie Indiana
26 posts, read 35,507 times
Reputation: 32

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I was borned in Arkansas and lived there until I was about 24 year old when the wife and me and the first 4 of are 9 children moved to Tennessee to be near my inlaws for about 6 or 7 year, then we moved to Indiana, to Muncie in central indiana where we been sense 19 and 56 and I am here to tell you what, about a third of the people around here in Central Indiana and Southern Indiana where a bout third of these Hoosiers talk just like they do in Kentucky. I cant really describe the accent because it aint S0uthern like Alabama or my home state of Arkansas, or even west Tennessee, but very simular to the beautiful state of west Virginia, the Central and some of Easern part of Kentucky, like near the town of Albany Kentucky, and the northern part of central and east Tennessee, like in the towns of Jamestown and Birdstown, the edge of the Smokey Mountains, It's like that part of the country is almost a region unto it's very own. Andd theres a lot of commerce that goes on with one another in that area of those states. I call that accent broken English.

I would bet my next social security check Louisville has lots of transplants from the North, plces like coneticut, Pennsylvania and Michigan, Chicago and even California. Most big cities in America are filled with transplants from those states.

If you tell some of these Hoosiers around here they talk like a Yankee, that's liable to get you in a fight. They take offense.

One way to tell where they hail from, ask them what they call the food that you eat with Turkey on Thanksgiving. If
there answer is stuffing, most likely there from the North. But if they answer back dressing, you can pretty much bet that person originated in the South.

PS --- Please forgive me if im making a lot of spelling errors. ive lost my specks when we went down to Austin Texas a couple of months ago to visit one of are grandsons and I can just barely see to read and write, or type. My new specks are do in on Tuesday the 23rd so please bare with me if I post anymorebefore then. Thaks yall.

Last edited by Virgil Steiner; 07-22-2013 at 01:29 AM..
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Old 07-22-2013, 10:12 PM
 
118 posts, read 208,859 times
Reputation: 214
Well 99.9% of Hoosiers I've met do talk like Yankees and I've told many to their face. I don't know who you've heard talk from Kentucky, but the accents are nothing alike. Guess you were in Covington. The upland south accent extends a few counties in to southern Indiana, then tapers off drastically once you're out of the Ohio valley, definitely not to Muncie. And yes Louisville is full of transplants, as every major metropolitan area in the country is, and this dilutes their culture and accent. Covington has also let Cincinnati rub off on it way to much, and the three counties across from it have lost their accent, but the rest of the natives of the state speak with a couple types of southern dialect. You can't honestly try to tell me you think someone from Muncie, IN and someone from Albany, Kentucky talk the same.
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Old 07-23-2013, 01:52 PM
 
Location: SW of Muncie Indiana
26 posts, read 35,507 times
Reputation: 32
Well mister tuckesse, you must a never been to muncie or to New castle. an you must a never been to cincinatta either. cincinaata is filled with folks from Kentucky. just like them other towns in Indiana is to. and I never did say ever body talks with that accent. I said about a third of the people do, what ever accent you want to call it. but it aint true southern, like Georgia and bama and ole miss is. and It aint Midwest accent either. matter of fact, most people in the deep south don't claim Kentucky as a true fellow southern state and most people in the Midwest don't claim Kentucky as a true fellow Midwest state. Now I reckon you could say that Kentucky is pretty much a state without a region. But it is a beautiful state none the less and lots of wonderful people. We been blessed with many good friends in and from Kentucky. We always love taking weekend trips to Kentucky. But we don't get there as much as we like to, it's just to long a drive anymore now that we're older and the kids are all gone. But we are planning going to Dale Hollar for 2 days over labor day in a couple months and then take a couple days to drive over to Arkansas to visit with my brothers and sisters and their familys that still live there.

P.S. - edited to corret spelling and gramer errors.
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Old 07-23-2013, 04:40 PM
 
Location: wannabeinkentucky
862 posts, read 1,496,713 times
Reputation: 1056
Quote:
Originally Posted by Virgil Steiner View Post



One way to tell where they hail from, ask them what they call the food that you eat with Turkey on Thanksgiving. If
there answer is stuffing, most likely there from the North. But if they answer back dressing, you can pretty much bet that person originated in the South.
I grew up in Iowa. We ALWAYS called it dressing. Never knew Iowa was in the South.
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Old 07-27-2013, 05:20 PM
 
Location: chesterfield,in
49 posts, read 73,475 times
Reputation: 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by tuckessee View Post
Well 99.9% of Hoosiers I've met do talk like Yankees and I've told many to their face. I don't know who you've heard talk from Kentucky, but the accents are nothing alike. Guess you were in Covington. The upland south accent extends a few counties in to southern Indiana, then tapers off drastically once you're out of the Ohio valley, definitely not to Muncie. And yes Louisville is full of transplants, as every major metropolitan area in the country is, and this dilutes their culture and accent. Covington has also let Cincinnati rub off on it way to much, and the three counties across from it have lost their accent, but the rest of the natives of the state speak with a couple types of southern dialect. You can't honestly try to tell me you think someone from Muncie, IN and someone from Albany, Kentucky talk the same.
all them "Hoosiers" you talked to must of been from Lake County (Chicago) Indiana.

Since I am from Anderson next county west from Muncie I can honestly say you have never been to New Castle.. my god I swear the sound of some of them people there sounds like they fell off the redneck truck.

But I will say Indiana is a very strange place accent wise. I have heard everything from Neutral/Midwest,Southern,Inland Northern,NYC,Boston type accents here.

I have had people ask me if I was from NY due to the way I pronounce things, But I was born here. and yet I have known people who were born here and they sound like they just transplanted from Alabama.

But lets look at the facts. south of I-70 was settled mainly by those from the south. North of I-70 settled by those from the North East. X amount of miles north and south of 70 you get a mix.
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Old 07-27-2013, 06:57 PM
 
2,391 posts, read 4,244,647 times
Reputation: 910
Quote:
Originally Posted by Virgil Steiner View Post
I was borned in Arkansas and lived there until I was about 24 year old when the wife and me and the first 4 of are 9 children moved to Tennessee to be near my inlaws for about 6 or 7 year, then we moved to Indiana, to Muncie in central indiana where we been sense 19 and 56 and I am here to tell you what, about a third of the people around here in Central Indiana and Southern Indiana where a bout third of these Hoosiers talk just like they do in Kentucky. I cant really describe the accent because it aint S0uthern like Alabama or my home state of Arkansas, or even west Tennessee, but very simular to the beautiful state of west Virginia, the Central and some of Easern part of Kentucky, like near the town of Albany Kentucky, and the northern part of central and east Tennessee, like in the towns of Jamestown and Birdstown, the edge of the Smokey Mountains, It's like that part of the country is almost a region unto it's very own. Andd theres a lot of commerce that goes on with one another in that area of those states. I call that accent broken English.

I would bet my next social security check Louisville has lots of transplants from the North, plces like coneticut, Pennsylvania and Michigan, Chicago and even California. Most big cities in America are filled with transplants from those states.

If you tell some of these Hoosiers around here they talk like a Yankee, that's liable to get you in a fight. They take offense.

One way to tell where they hail from, ask them what they call the food that you eat with Turkey on Thanksgiving. If
there answer is stuffing, most likely there from the North. But if they answer back dressing, you can pretty much bet that person originated in the South.

PS --- Please forgive me if im making a lot of spelling errors. ive lost my specks when we went down to Austin Texas a couple of months ago to visit one of are grandsons and I can just barely see to read and write, or type. My new specks are do in on Tuesday the 23rd so please bare with me if I post anymorebefore then. Thaks yall.

And I thought you were typing like the way you talk and kind of liked it the way you said "Birdstown" and probably meaning "Bardstown" for instance
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Old 07-28-2013, 08:30 AM
 
Location: downtown phoenix
1,192 posts, read 1,535,959 times
Reputation: 1873
The Kentucky accent is more of an exercise in horrible grammar than it is a regional accent. Things like "we was", "we seen", "it ain't neither", "them there" and "I done" are all things I hear on a daily basis and have really become part of the culture here. It's a shame, because people can really sound stupid, not because they have a drawl, but because they can't differentiate between plural and singular. I know extremely intelligent people here that make themselves sound not so smart by saying things like "I seen something". I'm not trying to put anyone down, I just think the whole hillbilly negative stereotype that gets tied to Kentucky just gets perpetuated by this.

I saw that they had seen that we were done when my post was finished, lol.
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Old 07-28-2013, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Eastern Kentucky
1,237 posts, read 2,818,279 times
Reputation: 1290
Well, no it didn't become a part of our culture, it is our culture. Should you care to study our language, you might find that it is the purest form of old English spoken in the world today. Because we are a closed culture we tend to speak as our ancestors did. Now, if you are more concerned with the way we say things than what we are saying, then I suppose we sound stupid to you. Personally, I love accents and different ways of saying things. I look for meaning rather than delivery. Yep, I often use the old ways to express myself, and just because you don't understand me does not make me stupid. Lol all you want. Makes no difference to me. Just makes me see you as someone who cannot see below the surface.
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Old 07-28-2013, 10:16 AM
 
Location: downtown phoenix
1,192 posts, read 1,535,959 times
Reputation: 1873
Quote:
Originally Posted by masonsdaughter View Post
Well, no it didn't become a part of our culture, it is our culture. Should you care to study our language, you might find that it is the purest form of old English spoken in the world today. Because we are a closed culture we tend to speak as our ancestors did. Now, if you are more concerned with the way we say things than what we are saying, then I suppose we sound stupid to you. Personally, I love accents and different ways of saying things. I look for meaning rather than delivery. Yep, I often use the old ways to express myself, and just because you don't understand me does not make me stupid. Lol all you want. Makes no difference to me. Just makes me see you as someone who cannot see below the surface.
I said in my post that I wasn't putting anyone down, just making a point of the negative impression people can get from bad grammar. Why don't you go and apply for a position at a fortune 500 company and during your interview use your "purest form of old English" then wait by the phone for your callback that isn't coming. Oh that's right, we are a "closed culture" and we don't need any high paying jobs or fancy talkers, we just continue to lead the nation in poverty and illiteracy and that's how we like it. We continue to do things our way, and the hell with anyone who might try to point out the things that keep us in the cellar.

Your grammar is excellent by the way.
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Old 07-28-2013, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Austin
1,771 posts, read 3,282,377 times
Reputation: 798
Quote:
Originally Posted by kytoaz View Post
I said in my post that I wasn't putting anyone down, just making a point of the negative impression people can get from bad grammar. Why don't you go and apply for a position at a fortune 500 company and during your interview use your "purest form of old English" then wait by the phone for your callback that isn't coming. Oh that's right, we are a "closed culture" and we don't need any high paying jobs or fancy talkers, we just continue to lead the nation in poverty and illiteracy and that's how we like it. We continue to do things our way, and the hell with anyone who might try to point out the things that keep us in the cellar.

Your grammar is excellent by the way.
I laughed a little when I read your Fortune 500 comment, thinking of a man I know very well who has Eastern Kentucky roots. He, with his imperfect grammar, being featured in a national publication. He, with his imperfect grammar, working with major universities to set up programs in the innovative field in which he worked. He, as a guest lecturer in business and engineering classes met, not with snickers about his grammar, but questions about content. He, who received a phone call from one of the most recognizable figures in the computer industry, offering a job for which he never applied.

No doubt, we use different registers when talking to different people, but some "errors" are so ingrained that they slip in from time to time. However, I have witnessed a situation where a few "I seen" and other grammatical errors didn't matter. At least not to those at the top of their field and those in academia. Maybe they are the truly educated ones. I know they are the truly successful ones.

Some say this is the last prejudice for which there hasn't been much public education, and I'd like to see that happen.

Last edited by capcat; 07-28-2013 at 12:59 PM..
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