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Old 07-25-2014, 06:47 PM
 
Location: In the Pearl of the Purchase, Ky
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mdiada View Post
louisville from what i remember didnt have many southern accents around. im from western kentucky and had a friend from colorado say my accent was "really bad" (really southern), and i thought so too until going to paducah. its only maybe an hour and a half away, and OMG you talk about southern.. even with that short of a distance! geez!
Take I-24 to the WK Parkway (part of I-69) to I-65 to Louisville and it's a little over 3 hours.
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Old 07-25-2014, 08:31 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ncmom2md View Post
I've always loved the strong southern accent of kentucky, Just the other day I ran into a lady who was in her 60s from louisville and had a very strong northern accent. I was wondering if Louisville had more of a northern accent then the rest of kentucky which has a very strong southern accent. Also if you keep going north or north east out of the city is the accent northern or southern? To me kentucky accent is very strange from one extream to the other.

Was she from Louisville, or did she just live there a long time? I live in Kentucky, but I am not "from" Kentucky, as I was born overseas; lived in California, and Hawaii. I do not have the Kentucky accent at all, but I have relatives who do. Louisville and Lexington tend to have more midwestern accents in my opinion. Northern Kentucky has the heavy nasal Cincinnati accent; while Lexington tends to have a more of a neutral/midwest (similar to Northern Kentucky, but less nasally; think Central/Northern Indiana). Louisville has similar; Lexington and Louisville are very transient cities; therefore, many do not have "Kentucky accents", even natives are having less of an accent.
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Old 07-31-2014, 07:44 AM
 
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I do not like the accents up in the northern part of KY. I've always thought they sound kind of dumb. Sorry, but that's coming from a transplant who has lived in lots of different areas. I've thought the accent here exaggerates the "a" sound. The first time I was in a grocery store and the clerk said to me "would you like paper or Play-stic" I thought I'd die. To my ear it's painful...ha! I can't stand to here Lisa Cooney do the news when she says "Tray fic"! I much prefer the more southern accent. Also when I worked in a bank, I'd hear other tellers say "please write your name 'AcrossT' the back of the check" In stead of across the back, they add the T sound to it. Some of it comes from the influence of Cincinnati and Indiana. Since we are technically the tri state area. I was raised by parents from North Carolina, so I suspect my little underlying southern accent might drive people crazy too. ....ha!
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Old 07-31-2014, 12:15 PM
 
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Originally Posted by tamaralj View Post
I do not like the accents up in the northern part of KY. I've always thought they sound kind of dumb. Sorry, but that's coming from a transplant who has lived in lots of different areas. I've thought the accent here exaggerates the "a" sound. The first time I was in a grocery store and the clerk said to me "would you like paper or Play-stic" I thought I'd die. To my ear it's painful...ha! I can't stand to here Lisa Cooney do the news when she says "Tray fic"! I much prefer the more southern accent. Also when I worked in a bank, I'd hear other tellers say "please write your name 'AcrossT' the back of the check" In stead of across the back, they add the T sound to it. Some of it comes from the influence of Cincinnati and Indiana. Since we are technically the tri state area. I was raised by parents from North Carolina, so I suspect my little underlying southern accent might drive people crazy too. ....ha!
I've heard plenty of southern speech by rural northern Kentuckians, albeit not as marked as points further down south but it's there. I have a cousin that lives in rural Campbell County, not far from Kenton county and has a noticable southern accent. He can see the Ohio river and the state of Ohio across the river from his upstairs window.
Those folks you're meeting, many of them may be transplants or 1st generation transplants of folks from SW Ohio possibly, even so, over their you'll sometimes hear a bit of twang also from some folks. Some of the biggest twang talking hillbillies I ever met lived over in southern Indiana around the Hoosier and also southern Illinois around Harrisburg
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Old 07-31-2014, 02:31 PM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
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NKY is an interesting case study. I was actually born there - to parents from Casey and Harlan cos - and didn't move to Russell Springs until age 4. I still have a sister, nephew, niece, and some more distant cousins up there. Most NKYians act and talk just like someone from Ohio or Michigan but people there who have parents from further South often retain somewhat of a Southern accent. The accents in rural NKY (Carrollton / Owentown / Falmouth / etc) is kind of a mix of rural North and Southern accents. Some have a little thang but nothing like you'd get along the TN border. Reminds me a lot of the accents in Southern Indiana
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Old 07-31-2014, 03:17 PM
 
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Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
NKY is an interesting case study. I was actually born there - to parents from Casey and Harlan cos - and didn't move to Russell Springs until age 4. I still have a sister, nephew, niece, and some more distant cousins up there. Most NKYians act and talk just like someone from Ohio or Michigan but people there who have parents from further South often retain somewhat of a Southern accent. The accents in rural NKY (Carrollton / Owentown / Falmouth / etc) is kind of a mix of rural North and Southern accents. Some have a little thang but nothing like you'd get along the TN border. Reminds me a lot of the accents in Southern Indiana
I agree, it's not as marked but generally in my experience, get south of Kenton or Campbell counties and it picks up pretty quick. Even Boone County folks have a bit of a draw. Also, I hear differences in western Kentucky and eastern Kentucky as well. They are both a form of southern speech but different, they have a different air to them. In my opinion there's no better example of a traditional western Kentucky accent than Gov Steve Beshear, bless his heart. You hear that man talk and it's pure western Kentucky, 100%. Eastern Kentucky? Listen to musician Ricky Skaggs talk, good grief....

Even so, I've heard that most N Kentucky folks that are "accentless" have Ohio roots or are from somewhere else. The older folks or folks that have roots in Northern Kentucky have a bit of twang with their thang.

I remember my grandfather had a Fox hunter friend from "Muhlenberg Co" lived down between Owensboro and Central City Kentucky. He was a fox hunter and raised, and liked to run dogs just like my grandfather did. But, he was kind of a poor man, raised hogs and a little bit of Tobacco. I remember the 1st time I met that man, I mean, I could not understand a WORD that man said. I can't even describe it, how that man's accent was soo thick. I wonder if he didn't have a bit of a lisp or disability along with it, but gosh, I had the hardest time understanding that man talk and he was an old Kentuckian! Nice as could be, but just couldn't understand a word of what he said.

I'd say once you get up above Dry Ridge Kentucky you'll hear less twang, but its' still there with quite a few folks, not quite as marked, it's a bit softer than eastern or western Kentucky but it's there, I've heard it. Check this out. "Kentucky Southern English" voted the best in the nation in 2013: http://www.tristatehomepage.com/stor...CEON7kkNyj2nTQ

Last edited by EricOldTime; 07-31-2014 at 03:29 PM..
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Old 11-24-2014, 09:32 AM
 
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I was listening to this video of Kentuckian Bill Monroe talk about his life growing up in western Kentucky. Anyways I've maybe said this before: This is the accent my grandparents speak with, and alot of older western Kentuckians for that matter. I think it's about the best example of a traditional western Kentucky draw you'll find anywhere:

He's speaking in the 3rd person but he often did that when talking about himself...


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AeafyuNMLpM#t=241
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Old 06-28-2019, 04:37 AM
 
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Hello, I'm wondering if anyone can help me. I'm looking for someone to record a few lines of dialogue for me. I'm an actor from England and will be playing someone from Kentucky in an upcoming tv show and want to do the dialect justice. Are there any native Kentucky folk on this thread that could help me? Aged between 18 - 40? Id like to send you the lines and then have you record them and send them back to me via email or something. It would be very helpful and I understand you all have busy lives, but wanted to ask. Many thanks. Jamie.
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Old 06-30-2019, 10:03 AM
 
11,004 posts, read 9,212,615 times
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Originally Posted by jamiekentucky View Post
Hello, I'm wondering if anyone can help me. I'm looking for someone to record a few lines of dialogue for me. I'm an actor from England and will be playing someone from Kentucky in an upcoming tv show and want to do the dialect justice. Are there any native Kentucky folk on this thread that could help me? Aged between 18 - 40? Id like to send you the lines and then have you record them and send them back to me via email or something. It would be very helpful and I understand you all have busy lives, but wanted to ask. Many thanks. Jamie.
What an interesting request. Does your role specify what part of Kentucky your character is from? That, along with your character's educational level, might make a huge difference. Some Kentuckians are very cosmopolitan, while others are rural (and some cosmopolitan Kentuckians are not well educated, while some rural Kentuckians are very well educated). Kentucky English reflects this (as do the various comments on this thread).

I am overage for your role, so can't help further. Are there American dialect coaches nearby to whom you could turn for assistance?
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