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Old 01-10-2014, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Eastern Kentucky Proud
912 posts, read 1,352,201 times
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Yep...I see Kentucky Highlands coming out of this smelling like a rose. And, who knows, the libs might come out of it with a few votes also. I thought that was illegal.
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Old 01-10-2014, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Austin
1,771 posts, read 3,282,644 times
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I listened to Judge Albey Brock of Bell County on NPR's "Here and Now" this afternoon. The interviewer tried her best to lead him to say that environmental policies weren't really the cause of difficulties in the region (as they relate to the coal industry), but he was having none of that. Now, I'm not against environmental protection, but I appreciate that he stood his ground and kept it real. Here's the audio of his interview, no transcript available at the time of posting.
http://hereandnow.wbur.org/2014/01/1...-zone-kentucky
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Old 01-11-2014, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Eastern Kentucky Proud
912 posts, read 1,352,201 times
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Thanks capcat, I had not heard this. It's very interesting to see Eastern Kentucky in the same situation (for the lack of a better term) as San Antonio, Los Angeles, and Philadelphia. If in fact they are. It's also interesting to note that all of these grant request were from the cities of each, and yet the grant request for South Eastern Kentucky was from Kentucky Highlands Investment Corporation. Does anyone have any back ground on Kentucky Highlands Investment Corporation? I'll tell you what little I know about Kentucky Highlands Investment Corporation. They are next door to the Cumberland Valley Area Development District, which controls all the A.R.C. money coming to the region and, they are very quiet. We all know how that has worked out. The A.R.C. has been in existence since 1965 (nearly 50 Yrs.) and what do they have to show for Billions of dollars spent but, not necessarily in Eastern/South Eastern Kentucky. Something else very interesting to note. Judge Brock said many miners were driving to Western Kentucky to work in mines in Western Kentucky...it's okay to mine coal in Western Kentucky or the rest of the Country for that matter but, it's not okay in Eastern Kentucky?

It sounded to me like Judge Brock, much like myself, is very skeptical about the whole situation because we have heard it all before, and, at the same time were trying to be optimistic. It's good to know how things work in this neck of the wood's and, how the rest of the State and possibly the Nation looks at Eastern/South Eastern Kentucky to understand. I'm also curious to know how the voting went in the "Promise Zone", last presidential election.

I could say a lot more but, that's enough for now.

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Old 01-15-2014, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Eastern Kentucky Proud
912 posts, read 1,352,201 times
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Sure seems to be a big news day for Eastern/South Eastern Kentucky. I'll just post what I read about it and you all can add as you like.

Rogers Praises House Passage of Omnibus Bill | U.S. House of Representatives

Gov. Beshear releases plan for extending, four-laning Mountain Parkway

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Old 01-17-2014, 12:00 PM
 
Location: Eastern Kentucky Proud
912 posts, read 1,352,201 times
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And News just keeps coming...What do you all think of the latest developments in the last few days?

Kentucky.gov: - Gov. Beshear, Congressman Rogers Issue SOAR Summit Report; Agriculture Secretary Vilsack Announces Regional StrikeForce
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Old 01-17-2014, 03:05 PM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
10,381 posts, read 21,920,611 times
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My dad's family were from Harlan Co (now all live in Central KY, SW Ohio, or E TN). I actually see the "problems" down there as being very similar to what is happening on Indian reservations.

I think my Appalachians are very independent people who struggle in a "Yankee" work environment where you have to obey orders (even if they don't make sense), have to sit or stand for 8 hours, and have to be as bland as possible so the company doesn't get sued. They survived for generations as independent hunters and farmers who knew every herb in the woods, could track any animal, make the finest home crafts (from banjos to rocking chairs), etc. At their core they want to live their lives their way without outsiders imposing their will on them.

The quintessential Appalachian would be my great great uncle Richard Pearl Morris. He didn't like Yankee guns so he made his own guns. (One is on display at a museum in SW Virginia) He once killed 25 rattlesnakes in one sitting. He always said he would die with his boots on, which he did at age 78 in his garden.

I think the coal industry destroyed Eastern KY because it killed the rural, independent nature of the area and forced most people into mining camps while most of the prime forest was bought by out of state coal companies. I've done my family tree and the generations before coal (without any modern medicine) routinely lived into their 80s for men and 90s for women. After coal life expectancy markedly declined. People in company towns start eating processed rather than garden grown food. Their free roaming life style was replaced with a cramped mining job. Then comes surface mining which has a tremendous negative impact on the environment.

Both Indians and Appalachians were better off before the "wonders" of civilization were forced on them. As it stands both live as a defeated people. Men feel their masculinity has been removed (as what they define as manhood is belittled by their society) and most chose suicide by poor diet. Others look to drug abuse or alcohol to have relief from their pain.

I think you have to recognize what the region's strengths are and focus on those. Modern America has been trying for decades to make them into passive, obedient, 40 hour lever pulling Yankees and they'll never be that.
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Old 01-17-2014, 03:52 PM
 
Location: Eastern Kentucky Proud
912 posts, read 1,352,201 times
Reputation: 937
Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
My dad's family were from Harlan Co (now all live in Central KY, SW Ohio, or E TN). I actually see the "problems" down there as being very similar to what is happening on Indian reservations.

I think my Appalachians are very independent people who struggle in a "Yankee" work environment where you have to obey orders (even if they don't make sense), have to sit or stand for 8 hours, and have to be as bland as possible so the company doesn't get sued. They survived for generations as independent hunters and farmers who knew every herb in the woods, could track any animal, make the finest home crafts (from banjos to rocking chairs), etc. At their core they want to live their lives their way without outsiders imposing their will on them.

The quintessential Appalachian would be my great great uncle Richard Pearl Morris. He didn't like Yankee guns so he made his own guns. (One is on display at a museum in SW Virginia) He once killed 25 rattlesnakes in one sitting. He always said he would die with his boots on, which he did at age 78 in his garden.

I think the coal industry destroyed Eastern KY because it killed the rural, independent nature of the area and forced most people into mining camps while most of the prime forest was bought by out of state coal companies. I've done my family tree and the generations before coal (without any modern medicine) routinely lived into their 80s for men and 90s for women. After coal life expectancy markedly declined. People in company towns start eating processed rather than garden grown food. Their free roaming life style was replaced with a cramped mining job. Then comes surface mining which has a tremendous negative impact on the environment.

Both Indians and Appalachians were better off before the "wonders" of civilization were forced on them. As it stands both live as a defeated people. Men feel their masculinity has been removed (as what they define as manhood is belittled by their society) and most chose suicide by poor diet. Others look to drug abuse or alcohol to have relief from their pain.

I think you have to recognize what the region's strengths are and focus on those. Modern America has been trying for decades to make them into passive, obedient, 40 hour lever pulling Yankees and they'll never be that.
Ha Ha....I don't think they/we want to be Yankee's either but, I'll agree with what you say. Not many people bring up the fact that coal hasn't always been an issue in Eastern Kentucky. And, I don't know if I have ever heard anyone compare Appalachians to Indians but, I can see a similarity. Fact is a lot claim to have Indian blood to some extent...which may or may not be true but, possible.

So, do you recognize the region's strength? Thanks for putting it that way...if someone had ask for their/our weaknesses' CD's servers would probably have a meltdown.


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Old 01-17-2014, 04:09 PM
 
Location: Austin
1,771 posts, read 3,282,644 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hogsrus View Post
And News just keeps coming...What do you all think of the latest developments in the last few days?

Kentucky.gov: - Gov. Beshear, Congressman Rogers Issue SOAR Summit Report; Agriculture Secretary Vilsack Announces Regional StrikeForce
I think it sounds encouraging. I thought many of the ideas were good ones, not the least of which is community involvement/volunteer opportunities, even if it's through the schools. Residents should continue to feel ownership in this general program for it to succeed to its fullest.

One seemingly minor cultural note that I disagree with, but it hits me hard, is "Hillbilly Days". That plays on a stereotype that doesn't honor the history of Eastern Kentucky. Early Settler/Pioneer Days (including the Longhunters who explored and camped in Kentucky) would be better. The fascinating, almost unbelievably difficult role early settlers played in western expansion should be a significant part of the cultural landscape. That, and everything about its history. Too many things to mention in a single post.

Like I've said before, my lines go back to Eastern Kentucky since the 1700s, so it's a personal interest. I visited just a couple of weeks ago and got out just before the water lines broke. Can't imagine how that has been for people.

Last edited by capcat; 01-17-2014 at 04:42 PM..
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Old 01-17-2014, 08:59 PM
 
Location: Eastern Kentucky Proud
912 posts, read 1,352,201 times
Reputation: 937
Quote:
Originally Posted by capcat View Post
I think it sounds encouraging. I thought many of the ideas were good ones, not the least of which is community involvement/volunteer opportunities, even if it's through the schools. Residents should continue to feel ownership in this general program for it to succeed to its fullest.

One seemingly minor cultural note that I disagree with, but it hits me hard, is "Hillbilly Days". That plays on a stereotype that doesn't honor the history of Eastern Kentucky. Early Settler/Pioneer Days (including the Longhunters who explored and camped in Kentucky) would be better. The fascinating, almost unbelievably difficult role early settlers played in western expansion should be a significant part of the cultural landscape. That, and everything about its history. Too many things to mention in a single post.

Like I've said before, my lines go back to Eastern Kentucky since the 1700s, so it's a personal interest. I visited just a couple of weeks ago and got out just before the water lines broke. Can't imagine how that has been for people.
Here is just a little info/History on the "Hillbilly Days" festival...personally I don't have a problem with it but, maybe they should change the name. I guess it's all in what we envision a Hillbilly to be. Like I have said before, it's good to hear from someone with a different perspective.

Hillbilly Days - How it all Started....
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Old 01-18-2014, 10:25 AM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
10,381 posts, read 21,920,611 times
Reputation: 10084
There is an industry that exists and would flourish if certain laws were changed lol. I know my cousin that grows the stuff in DBNF would double his reported income over night

Seriously I think small scale organic farmer and herb farming along with (seriously) moonshine would be great. Natioanlly and across the globe the trend is towards supporting small farms and local wines/ bourbans etc. Central KY is booming with the winery industry. Crafts are another big thing, Berea already has a large craft economy.

I really think the big problem now is the amount of land that coal companies own and won't resale to the public even once mining ends. Too often when the parent dies the kids only see a one time check of $30,000 by selling the land to big coal, not understanding the value of the land is more than coal. Plus usually the people that make money selling their land just move to Florida anyway. My fiance's family is from Letcher Co but live in Southern Indiana. They got so much money from the coal on the land that they take multi week trips to Hawaii each year. Good for them, but how does that help the people still in Letcher Co?

Ok I like to ramble. My sugestions are

1. Focus on small scale farming, crafts, and tourism rather than 4 lane roads and factories
2. legalize weed and moonshine LOL
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