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Old 01-21-2016, 11:19 PM
 
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I think everyone in Lexington would like to know what's going on with CentrePointe.

The "Lexington Herald-Leader" has covered the debacle in detail, and I would refer you to their site rather than trying to go into in depth here, but various wildly overly optimistic claims of intentions to build a hotel, condominium, combined office building/condo/hotel, combined hotel/small shops, and lately, a new city government center have been made by a variety of owners over the years. Sadly, Lexington lost several significant historic buildings to the pit. Vague claims of overseas funding - never identified clearly as to who or where - have also been made. The cranes and the current "developers" have been given yet another 30 day extension to produce something - some evidence of life - once again. I am not optimistic. At least the tops of the seemingly abandoned cranes have been swung away from the airspace over Main Street now - it made me uneasy to walk or drive beneath them.

At least before the hole was dug, the plot was sodded with bluegrass, surrounded by white fences, and was used by the public on holidays. Now - it's a gaping hole, located in the physical heart of Lexington. Perhaps UK's geology classes could use it as a field trip destination, as the layers of limestone underlying downtown Lexington are on display.

In regard to your other impressions, to me, Chevy Chase is far more village-like than "city city". It's walkable, includes varied housing, schools, shopping (both chain and individually owned small businesses), has a mature tree canopy, a cathedral and other churches, a city park in walking distance, even a stately home less than a mile away (Ashland, the Henry Clay Estate).

Sadly, we no longer have a movie theater - the old Ashland Theater is long gone - or a variety store - or Ball's Ice Cream factory outlet store, which used to be where Billy's Barbecue used to be (Joella's Hot Chicken is moving into that site). Begley's is gone, replaced by Rite Aid. The bookmobile no longer stops in Chevy Chase (because there aren't any bookmobiles in Lexington any more). Yet I always run into acquaintances at the grocery store or book store.

Perhaps it's a matter of semantics. Chevy Chase is reasonably compact, as you note - great for walking or biking. It also has a fair degree of sophistication, and I'd wager that most adult residents/property owners are college graduates or the equivalent (I assume when you write of "Chevy Chase", you are including both the retail area and the residential area).

Chevy Chase's boundaries merge almost seamlessly into Hollywood, an older area across Tates Creek Road, and Ashland Park, another older area to the east of Chevy Chase. Lakewood also adjoins Chevy Chase, as does the younger Mount Vernon, across Tates Creek from Cassidy and Morton Schools.
Residents of these areas also frequent the Chevy Chase shopping center. All of these factors do add up to a fairly urbane populace. But I still would not refer to Chevy Chase itself as "urban". It's avoided that fate, thank goodness!
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Old 01-22-2016, 12:41 PM
 
6,836 posts, read 14,440,152 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
I think everyone in Lexington would like to know what's going on with CentrePointe.

The "Lexington Herald-Leader" has covered the debacle in detail, and I would refer you to their site rather than trying to go into in depth here, but various wildly overly optimistic claims of intentions to build a hotel, condominium, combined office building/condo/hotel, combined hotel/small shops, and lately, a new city government center have been made by a variety of owners over the years. Sadly, Lexington lost several significant historic buildings to the pit. Vague claims of overseas funding - never identified clearly as to who or where - have also been made. The cranes and the current "developers" have been given yet another 30 day extension to produce something - some evidence of life - once again. I am not optimistic. At least the tops of the seemingly abandoned cranes have been swung away from the airspace over Main Street now - it made me uneasy to walk or drive beneath them.

At least before the hole was dug, the plot was sodded with bluegrass, surrounded by white fences, and was used by the public on holidays. Now - it's a gaping hole, located in the physical heart of Lexington. Perhaps UK's geology classes could use it as a field trip destination, as the layers of limestone underlying downtown Lexington are on display.

In regard to your other impressions, to me, Chevy Chase is far more village-like than "city city". It's walkable, includes varied housing, schools, shopping (both chain and individually owned small businesses), has a mature tree canopy, a cathedral and other churches, a city park in walking distance, even a stately home less than a mile away (Ashland, the Henry Clay Estate).

Sadly, we no longer have a movie theater - the old Ashland Theater is long gone - or a variety store - or Ball's Ice Cream factory outlet store, which used to be where Billy's Barbecue used to be (Joella's Hot Chicken is moving into that site). Begley's is gone, replaced by Rite Aid. The bookmobile no longer stops in Chevy Chase (because there aren't any bookmobiles in Lexington any more). Yet I always run into acquaintances at the grocery store or book store.

Perhaps it's a matter of semantics. Chevy Chase is reasonably compact, as you note - great for walking or biking. It also has a fair degree of sophistication, and I'd wager that most adult residents/property owners are college graduates or the equivalent (I assume when you write of "Chevy Chase", you are including both the retail area and the residential area).

Chevy Chase's boundaries merge almost seamlessly into Hollywood, an older area across Tates Creek Road, and Ashland Park, another older area to the east of Chevy Chase. Lakewood also adjoins Chevy Chase, as does the younger Mount Vernon, across Tates Creek from Cassidy and Morton Schools.
Residents of these areas also frequent the Chevy Chase shopping center. All of these factors do add up to a fairly urbane populace. But I still would not refer to Chevy Chase itself as "urban". It's avoided that fate, thank goodness!
Craig, by "urban" I mean walkable, sophisticated, grown up, bikable, and a good housing stock. This is the part of Lexington that comes closes to say, 3 blocks of Bardstown Rd in Louisville's Highlands with retail, etc. Outside UKs campus, which is really almost connected, this area of Lexington feels the most vibrant and pedestrian oriented. A better comparison is probably to the "heart of St Matthews" in Louisville as the demographics are similar and the size of the retail district is closer (although heart of St Matts has probably 50 more business than Chevy Chase, easily).

Lexington is a quaint town. I think there is a high quality of life. But it is still a college town. Literally everything there is geared toward students. UK, like UofL, has an impressive building boom going on, and I think if I were a college student in the state of KY, UK would be the place to be.

Even downtown Lexington, while very nice, has most of its old corner and commercial buildings geared toward college age "dollar pint" type of bars.

There is some sophistication in Lexington, too. Sunshine Bakery is as good as you will find anywhere, and there are a few decent restaurants, but most of them serve average, pedestrian food. I have eaten at probably 50 restaurants in Lex through the years so I can say this with authority. My favorite restaurant in Lex is actually Korean:

http://www.yelp.com/biz/han-woo-ri-lexington

This spot is as good as any Korean in the state, even if it is "dumbed down" a bit for the American taste.
To me, a development like Centre Point signals that Lex wants to be more fof a "city" and it would add serious density to the core. I haven't followed the news on it for awhile, but I hope it goes up. I think it is probably important for urbanism in the state. The makeover of the Square through the years and the Urban Outfitters are a real centerpiece. More developments like that CentrePoint and CenterCourt, and a resurgence in some of the older areas on the north side, past Transy, would really help elevate Lexington into more than a University town.
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Old 01-22-2016, 01:27 PM
 
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Peter, take a look at the article about CentrePointe in today's kentucky.com, the website for the Lexington "Herald-Leader", for more background and info about the current state of the "hole". It's very enlightening - and very frustrating, too. Be sure to read the comments as well.

For me personally, restaurants and bars are not what makes a city "special", in fact, while they are a factor, for me they are a very small part of a city's ambiance. I expect food allergies influence my tendency to find my joy elsewhere than in restaurants, be they in Lexington, Louisville, or elsewhere. Too many are simply sources of frustration rather than pleasure for me these days.

I do appreciate history, architecture, parks, museums, concerts, theatre, libraries, etc., along with the beautiful Inner Bluegrass which surrounds Lexington and the proximity to the Kentucky River Palisades and the Eastern Kentucky mountains. Louisville is also blessed by having wonderful city parks which clearly outshine Lexington's parks (with the exception of Raven Run), a great history, wonderful museums, and much more.

But why not just be thankful that we live in a commonwealth which includes both cities, rather than continually trying to prove Louisville's superiority?? That's like trying to state that red is better than blue...while both are beautiful colors, and each adds to the full spectrum.
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Old 01-23-2016, 08:07 AM
 
6,836 posts, read 14,440,152 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
Peter, take a look at the article about CentrePointe in today's kentucky.com, the website for the Lexington "Herald-Leader", for more background and info about the current state of the "hole". It's very enlightening - and very frustrating, too. Be sure to read the comments as well.

For me personally, restaurants and bars are not what makes a city "special", in fact, while they are a factor, for me they are a very small part of a city's ambiance. I expect food allergies influence my tendency to find my joy elsewhere than in restaurants, be they in Lexington, Louisville, or elsewhere. Too many are simply sources of frustration rather than pleasure for me these days.

I do appreciate history, architecture, parks, museums, concerts, theatre, libraries, etc., along with the beautiful Inner Bluegrass which surrounds Lexington and the proximity to the Kentucky River Palisades and the Eastern Kentucky mountains. Louisville is also blessed by having wonderful city parks which clearly outshine Lexington's parks (with the exception of Raven Run), a great history, wonderful museums, and much more.

But why not just be thankful that we live in a commonwealth which includes both cities, rather than continually trying to prove Louisville's superiority?? That's like trying to state that red is better than blue...while both are beautiful colors, and each adds to the full spectrum.
I agree. I don't think Louisville is superior to Lexington...only larger and different. The cities actually complement each other since they are close.
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Old 01-24-2016, 11:49 PM
 
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My guess would be home resale values would be better in Louisville simply because it's the bigger city with more jobs. Add on the fact that it continually comes up as a top new city for people to move to, it's hipster/arts scene is growing, and it receives praised worldwide for its food scene. I've seen at least 5 articles in the past few weeks putting Louisville in rankings for best food scenes in the world or US. That's going to attract a lot of people probably.

In Louisville, look along I-71. Anchorage, Glenview, Indian Hills, Prospect, etc. That area has the more expensive homes.
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Old 01-25-2016, 07:09 AM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
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Lexington actually did great for home prices even during the recession. Home prices is about supply and demand, not just amenities. Lexington has very little urban blight because it had little heavy industry, so you don't have neighborhoods that have lots of vacant lots or abandoned homes. Half of Louisville is great but the other half has tied to industries that have declined since 1970. Those areas tend to bring down average home values for the whole city. Louisville did have the highest ever home prices (per ave sale price) this summer and the gold rush was the area between U of L and the Highlands were values doubled in the past decade. For someone buying now for investment I'd say Indiana is way underpriced and that will change once the bridges open this fall. I bought a nice 2 br ranch house for $55k, even in Shively it would cost $80k.


In our region Cincinnati seems to have the worst problem with home resale values. I had an aunt who died a couple years ago and the house is up for sale. It's in great condition and in a safe neighborhood but it may sale for as much as it did when she bought it in 1989! I think it's population loss to Kentucky due to the large property tax difference.
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Old 05-01-2016, 01:01 AM
 
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Originally Posted by drewg41 View Post
Oh boy. Peter, I'm sure you're busy taking pictures of rusty bridges which seems to be what most Louisville people do during the day but if you think that particular area is lacking then it's clear you need to get out a bit more in Lexington. Al's Bar, Arcadium, Minton's, Charmed Life Tattoo, Broomwagon, Kentucky Fun Mall, Fleet Street, Night Market, Indi's, Maria's Kitchen, soon to be the new A La Lucie's location (Bryan and Limestone) and the old LexTran mural building will be turned into an open face market.

This is, of course, not mentioning the affordable housing initiative going on there. A lot of neighborhoods in the NoLi and Castlewood, Loudon area are booming with new residents.

Granted, there are negatives that come along with gentrification and I could go on about it. But MY point is, in reading your posts, you're an expert on Louisville but have convinced yourself you are one on Lexington. Your posts suggests otherwise.

My observations have been on a Thursday, Friday or Saturday night a large part of downtown Lexington is a lot more vibrant than downtown Louisville. Outside of 4th Street Live which is objectively terrible and a few other pockets, downtown struggles to bring in a crowd unless UofL is playing. Indianapolis and Nashville both have I-65 run between them and Louisville's downtown is the dullest of the 3.

This is not true of Bardstown Road ever...or NuLu (but only before 10pm). After 10pm Nulu is virtually dead and is in great need of food trucks, more late night activities. This is something much of the northside of Lexington and the bars have done a good job of, conversely.

Waterfront Wednesdays in Louisville does draw a large crowd. The waterfront is one of the few downtown things that does on a consistent basis.
Nice try with the rough bridge thing. Your post is so off it is not worth a response. As you mentioned, downtown Louisville has "districts" That's because its a big city compared to the college town of Lexington. By the way, welcome to the forum. Your first 3 posts are a bit inflammatory. try to calm it down.

And just because you went a few times to downtown does not mean you know Louisville. It is extremely vibrant.Just look in the Indiana thread for Indianapolis where a poster comments on the serious vibrancy of dt Louisville on a Monday.

That said, you left out the best parts of Louisville like Frankfort Ave and St matthews, old louisville, butcher town, the list goes on of urban environments for which Lexington has no answer. A fifth place urban nabe like Germantown and Goss Ave alone blow North Limestone and places like Arcadia out.

The north side of Lexington is far from jumping. I stay there once every couple weeks. Lexington is and will forever be a small college town, but it is a great small quaint, walkable college town. Louisville and Lexington are like comparing Knoxville vs Nashville. Huge difference.
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