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Old 05-12-2016, 03:46 PM
 
13,261 posts, read 6,273,277 times
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I recently read and saw video of the tornado outbreak in Western Kentucky. It seems several schools were just missed, thank God but some homes were destroyed. Please correct me if I'm wrong.
Does Mayfield have a siren as a warning for tornadoes? Do you hunker down at home and hope for the best or is there a relatively safe public building that is used for a tornado shelter when the weather turns favorable to them forming? Are brick and block houses safer than wood frame? I don't think I could live in Western Kentucky without a basement for my piece of mind, although I realize even that may not save you.
I'm used to earthquakes and waiting for the "big one" to hit, but have no idea what it's like to live in an area of the country where tornadoes are not all that uncommon.
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Old 05-12-2016, 07:03 PM
 
Location: Caverns measureless to man...
7,338 posts, read 5,129,783 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
I'm used to earthquakes and waiting for the "big one" to hit, but have no idea what it's like to live in an area of the country where tornadoes are not all that uncommon.
Neither do most people in Kentucky, because they aren't very common here at all. I'm constantly baffled at how many people think Kentucky has a lot of tornadoes - we just don't. Kentucky is about the middle of the pack for tornadoes, usually ranking somewhere in the 20s. Tornadoes are far more common in states like Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Indiana, but you seldom see people posting in their forums asking how residents of those states deal with the threat of tornadoes. I really don't get it. I saw tornadoes all the time when I lived up north, and we never thought anything of it unless one caused serious damage or injury. Down here, people are obsessed with them for some reason, and I can't fathom why.

But to answer the question, I guess we just do what most other people do in the rest of the country. We live our lives, and if there's a severe storm warning and threat of a tornado, we go to the basement or a small room in the interior of the house for 10 or 15 minutes until it's over. Then we go back to whatever we were doing. It's no big deal. I think I've done that once in the approximately 5 years I've been here. Very, very few people in Kentucky have ever seen a tornado.

And yes, most communities do have a siren for tornadoes and severe storms. I hear ours once a month when they test it. Only times I've ever heard it.
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Old 05-13-2016, 06:49 AM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
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Getting an EF3 with a 10 mile track on a low risk day is very rare, I doubt that will happen again for a long time. Unless you live in a mobile home you don't have much to worry about. Remember tornadoes, even huge ones, hit a very small land area, your odds of being hit are tiny. Every decade or two there will be a real tornado outbreak that will produce the EF4/ EF5 ones that you need to worry about. The problem is the National Weather Services issues so many warnings, 80% of which are false, that it's hard for a non weather enthusiast to know what's serious or bull crap. I recommend following a local meteorologist you trust on Facebook or Twitter and they will make it clear when it's serious or not. You can sign up to get weather alerts texted to you as well.
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Old 05-13-2016, 10:00 PM
 
Location: In the Pearl of the Purchase, Ky
8,197 posts, read 13,690,870 times
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I was about a mile from the tornado and stood in the warehouse door of my job watching it. I could tell it wasn't headed my way so I wasn't too worried about that part. My DIL works at the hospital across the Purchase Parkway from the schools and, once they had all their patients in their safe locations, she and other nurses stood in the window taking pictures.
In this video, the Youngbloods they mention is a camper and RV center that was hit.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=559hZZuFwLI

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=udYYzJt4kno

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kkMk8oni8vc
What was amazing was the way people jumped in to help those who needed it. On the WPSD news at 6, around 3 hours after the tornado hit, they showed volunteers helping home owners clear their property and try to find their belongings. There is one man looking for his dog. He was holding the dog in his arms when the tornado took him away.
I had a friend sitting outside Graves County Elementary, picking up her kids and noticed people running past her and pointing behind her. Then she saw it in her rear view mirror and all she could say was "Oh, SH*T!" She finally got into the school building where all the students were already crouched in the hallways. Graves County Sheriff Dewayne Redmon hit the nail on the head when being interviewed on TV and in the press conference the next day that God was definitely looking over those students. The tornado destroyed an antique shop and was headed right for the schools when it picked up, went over the school, and sat back down.
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Old 05-13-2016, 10:29 PM
 
Location: In the Pearl of the Purchase, Ky
8,197 posts, read 13,690,870 times
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Here's the story about the man still looking for his dog.

Tornado survivor searches for his dog - WPSD Local 6: Your news, weather, and sports authority
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