U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Kentucky
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-05-2016, 09:32 AM
eok
 
6,684 posts, read 3,413,151 times
Reputation: 8472

Advertisements

One minor difference between Kentucky and Michigan is that you're more likely to get Lyme disease in Michigan.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-05-2016, 06:43 PM
 
1,098 posts, read 1,309,655 times
Reputation: 1194
More likely? I would've thought ticks (and therefore Lyme disease) would be worse in Kentucky. Speaking of that, what's the dangerous animal/bug situation like down there? Michigan has so few that I've gone thirty years out in the woods without ever coming across any. Are there problems with snakes, venomous insects or the like indoors down there?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-06-2016, 01:52 AM
eok
 
6,684 posts, read 3,413,151 times
Reputation: 8472
Lyme disease is carried by tiny deer ticks that live in more northern climates than Kentucky. The ticks in Kentucky are much bigger and don't carry Lyme disease. And they aren't very common. The most dangerous insects in the world are mosquitoes. But fortunately most of the diseases they spread are presently in other countries than the USA. There are things you can do about them. Such as keep dragonflies around your ponds, and various critters that eat the mosquito eggs. Or live in an area with no stagnant ponds. Most mosquitoes never fly very far from where they were born, which is usually on a stagnant pond or puddle. You also have to worry about wasps and spiders. But there aren't very many wasps and they won't bother you if you don't bother them. And most spiders are completely harmless to humans. I'm sure there are poisonous snakes, but I've never seen any in the wild. Spiders never bite humans unless attacked. But, unfortunately, you can attack them without noticing it. Such as if you brush your hand against a spider you didn't notice. But the odds are the bite will be completely harmless, and you probably won't even notice it, unless it's one of a few rare species. But those species tend to hide better, where you're less likely to encounter them.

The main problem with Lyme disease ticks is that they're hard to notice, and you have to inspect all over your skin carefully every single time you go anywhere they might lurk, to make sure you don't have any. The sooner you get medical attention for Lyme disease, the easier it is to treat. Look for their bite mark, which is a tiny red dot where they bit surrounded by a red circle.

One thing that helps to keep from being bit by mosquitoes and their ilk is to wear a long sleeve cotton shirt when doing your gardening. The cotton absorbs your sweat and acts like an air conditioner. And also put some mosquito repellent on your face and all exposed surfaces. And keep mosquitoes out of your house by using good window screens.

The few times people in Kentucky get Lyme disease, it's from traveling to northern states.

The biggest difference between critters such as ticks, mosquitoes, etc., and critters such as snakes, spiders, etc., is that the ticks, mosquitoes, etc., deliberately attack you as part of their lifestyle, as part of how they live. Snakes, spiders, etc., only attack in self defense. That makes a big difference in how you deal with them.

Last edited by eok; 06-06-2016 at 02:21 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-06-2016, 05:41 AM
 
Location: Pure Michigan!
4,544 posts, read 7,871,419 times
Reputation: 7165
Quote:
Originally Posted by VM1138 View Post
More likely? I would've thought ticks (and therefore Lyme disease) would be worse in Kentucky. Speaking of that, what's the dangerous animal/bug situation like down there? Michigan has so few that I've gone thirty years out in the woods without ever coming across any. Are there problems with snakes, venomous insects or the like indoors down there?
My daughter and I were hiking in Daniel Boone National Forest a couple of years ago and came across some type of rattlesnake in the path. It was coiled to strike and definitely had a rattle, which was the first thing that alerted us, thank God. We googled venomous snakes native to KY and figured it to be a timber rattlesnake, since it was very dark, almost black.

Very scary encounter, as we, like you, live in Michigan where we just mostly take it for granted that we won't be running into anything venomous when out hiking. We hadn't run into any other hikers that day, even though the gentleman at the visitors' center said that the trail we were taking was one of their most popular, and we were many miles from the nearest hospital or urgent care, so we freaked out a little bit and ran a huge arc off of the path and into the woods to avoid it. Of course, we probably could have easily stepped on his brother running through the woods to avoid him, LOL, but we didn't think of that and fortunately it didn't happen.

Other than that snake encounter, Daniel Boone National Forest is a beautiful nature area and well worth a visit if you do end up making a move.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-06-2016, 06:11 AM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
10,427 posts, read 21,942,404 times
Reputation: 10121
Kentucky has a big gap between the more affluent and educated metro areas and the poorer rural areas, especially Eastern KY which is as poor as the Mississippi Delta or western Indian Reservations. If you're in Louisville, Lexington, Northern KY, etc you're not going to be surrounded by poverty, they're at or above the national average in income and life expectancy.


In terms of natural environment both states are a mix of farm land and forest. Michigan is surrounded by the Great Lakes, Kentucky only has man made lakes but also some mountains in the SE. I don't think either state is well run at the state govt level. Kentucky is much more Southern in culture but not as uniformly as you would think, the southern suburbs of Cincinnati feel mostly Midwestern as does the eastern half of Louisville to a lesser extent. Western half of Louisville is mostly working class Upper South and Lexington is quite Southern. I'd recommend choosing a relocation place based on how similar you want it to be to where you live now. If you like Michigan but want milder winters then look to NKY or East Louisville. If you want more of a change I'd go with Lexington. If you really want Southern culture go with Bowling Green.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-06-2016, 06:15 AM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
10,427 posts, read 21,942,404 times
Reputation: 10121
Quote:
Originally Posted by canudigit View Post
My daughter and I were hiking in Daniel Boone National Forest a couple of years ago and came across some type of rattlesnake in the path. It was coiled to strike and definitely had a rattle, which was the first thing that alerted us, thank God. We googled venomous snakes native to KY and figured it to be a timber rattlesnake, since it was very dark, almost black.

Very scary encounter, as we, like you, live in Michigan where we just mostly take it for granted that we won't be running into anything venomous when out hiking. We hadn't run into any other hikers that day, even though the gentleman at the visitors' center said that the trail we were taking was one of their most popular, and we were many miles from the nearest hospital or urgent care, so we freaked out a little bit and ran a huge arc off of the path and into the woods to avoid it. Of course, we probably could have easily stepped on his brother running through the woods to avoid him, LOL, but we didn't think of that and fortunately it didn't happen.

Other than that snake encounter, Daniel Boone National Forest is a beautiful nature area and well worth a visit if you do end up making a move.

Timber Rattlers are a huge snake but they have a very mild temperament, fatalities are almost unheard of. They're southern cousins in the Deep South bite much quicker. TR's are found in abundance as far north as Brown County State Park in Indiana. Copperheads are smaller but bite more often, usually not fatal but I've heard of people getting legs amputated rarely. I hike a lot and there's a lot more snakes (big ones) in southern KY than in the Bluegrass Region, which is mostly garter snakes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-06-2016, 10:14 AM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
10,427 posts, read 21,942,404 times
Reputation: 10121
Lexington Herald Leader had an article today highlighting the differences in life expectancy across the state, it graphically shows what I was talking about. Very odd why the Cincinnati counties in KY are so much behind other urban counties.


Where you live in Kentucky might cut eight years off your life | Lexington Herald-Leader


Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Kentucky
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top