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Old 08-28-2016, 05:00 PM
 
8,256 posts, read 17,353,738 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldhag1 View Post
You might want to share with Mom that Kentucky law is that cars must be registered in the state within 15 days of moving there, the only exemptions for dependent full-time college students and military. If she gets caught she will be fined and made to pay all back taxes on the vehicle plus interest. A couple of civillain employees at Fort Knox made that mistake and it cost them thousands. The state take takes it seriously since property taxes on vehicles are a major source of income.
Again, that's under control, and too personal to put on blast in a public forum.
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Old 08-28-2016, 09:41 PM
 
Location: My beloved Bluegrass
20,126 posts, read 16,167,528 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
Again, that's under control, and too personal to put on blast in a public forum.
The only way it could be under control is either if she now has Kentucky plates, and therefore doesn't have to worry about trashy conservative Kentucky women with babies in the backseat cussing her out for being from liberal California, or if she lives somewhere other than Lexington or anyplace place else in Kentucky. If neither of those are true she needs to immediately get those Kentucky plates and hope they don't figure out she has been here a while.

The stereotypes get old. Very old. Kentuckians are not a bunch of foaming-at-the-mouth conservative radicals anymore than Californians are a bunch foaming-at-the-mouth radical liberals. Louisville and parts of Northern Kentucky actually have a strong liberal lean. Nobody is shut out based on where they went to school. Have you looked at the Metro Council, the JCPS school board, or the Chamber of Commerce? Clearly the leadership of Louisville, whether commercial or political, is not composed of just Saint X and Trinity grads.

I get that some people may not find Kentucky to their liking because of things like it not being a very populated state or that they may feel the culture doesn't suit them but that doesn't justify spinning stories that play on negative stereotypes to insult the people or the state. I have lived a lot of places and what I have found is that there are positives and negatives about every single place, how much I liked a place was a matter of how important the positives were to me and how unimportant the negative things were to me. I, for instance, would never willingly move back to California; my husband and sons were pulled over more there for "driving while black" than any other state we have lived in. Two of the times my husband, a military JAG officer, was pulled over because "he was driving suspiciously" he was handcuffed while they called in his license. Handcuffed. A middle aged, cooperative, non-violent, polite man who had broken no laws. Does that mean I think all Californians are racist bigots, let alone call them that? No. But it does mean I really would prefer not to live there ever again. (By the way, he has never been pulled over even once in Kentucky, let alone 5 times in 2 1/2 years.)

Please stop referring to the good people of Kentucky as intolerant white trash, it is unfair and insulting. If you have met a couple of less than wonderful people while living in the state I am sorry about your misfortune but that doesn't give you the right to paint everyone with a negative brush. It would probably help make the time you have left here more enjoyable if you didn't operate under the assumption the entire state is composed of nothing but Kim Davis clones.
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When I post in bold red that is moderator action and, per the TOS, can only be discussed through Direct Message.Moderator - Diabetes and Kentucky (including Lexington & Louisville)
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Old 08-29-2016, 08:28 PM
 
7,070 posts, read 16,749,925 times
Reputation: 3559
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldhag1 View Post
The only way it could be under control is either if she now has Kentucky plates, and therefore doesn't have to worry about trashy conservative Kentucky women with babies in the backseat cussing her out for being from liberal California, or if she lives somewhere other than Lexington or anyplace place else in Kentucky. If neither of those are true she needs to immediately get those Kentucky plates and hope they don't figure out she has been here a while.

The stereotypes get old. Very old. Kentuckians are not a bunch of foaming-at-the-mouth conservative radicals anymore than Californians are a bunch foaming-at-the-mouth radical liberals. Louisville and parts of Northern Kentucky actually have a strong liberal lean. Nobody is shut out based on where they went to school. Have you looked at the Metro Council, the JCPS school board, or the Chamber of Commerce? Clearly the leadership of Louisville, whether commercial or political, is not composed of just Saint X and Trinity grads.

I get that some people may not find Kentucky to their liking because of things like it not being a very populated state or that they may feel the culture doesn't suit them but that doesn't justify spinning stories that play on negative stereotypes to insult the people or the state. I have lived a lot of places and what I have found is that there are positives and negatives about every single place, how much I liked a place was a matter of how important the positives were to me and how unimportant the negative things were to me. I, for instance, would never willingly move back to California; my husband and sons were pulled over more there for "driving while black" than any other state we have lived in. Two of the times my husband, a military JAG officer, was pulled over because "he was driving suspiciously" he was handcuffed while they called in his license. Handcuffed. A middle aged, cooperative, non-violent, polite man who had broken no laws. Does that mean I think all Californians are racist bigots, let alone call them that? No. But it does mean I really would prefer not to live there ever again. (By the way, he has never been pulled over even once in Kentucky, let alone 5 times in 2 1/2 years.)

Please stop referring to the good people of Kentucky as intolerant white trash, it is unfair and insulting. If you have met a couple of less than wonderful people while living in the state I am sorry about your misfortune but that doesn't give you the right to paint everyone with a negative brush. It would probably help make the time you have left here more enjoyable if you didn't operate under the assumption the entire state is composed of nothing but Kim Davis clones.

In general, Jessem is a big defender of Louisville and KY. Lately, his tone has turned very negative. I suspect some personal issues with relationship or probably a couple ignorant folks.

I think JesseM is in for a surprise if he moves to Philly. It is actually more like Louisville than he may think, only 4 times bigger. I think he would be better to stay in Louisville and watch it grow.
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Old 08-29-2016, 10:02 PM
 
Location: My beloved Bluegrass
20,126 posts, read 16,167,528 times
Reputation: 28335
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
In general, Jessem is a big defender of Louisville and KY. Lately, his tone has turned very negative. I suspect some personal issues with relationship or probably a couple ignorant folks.

I think JesseM is in for a surprise if he moves to Philly. It is actually more like Louisville than he may think, only 4 times bigger. I think he would be better to stay in Louisville and watch it grow.
Honestly, I think Louisville is a lot safer and for the most part cleaner.
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When I post in bold red that is moderator action and, per the TOS, can only be discussed through Direct Message.Moderator - Diabetes and Kentucky (including Lexington & Louisville)
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Old 08-29-2016, 10:16 PM
 
8,256 posts, read 17,353,738 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldhag1 View Post

Honestly, I think Louisville is a lot safer and for the most part cleaner.
It's safer and cleaner, but I like urban places more. I like the older historic urbanness of a city like Philly. I like walking and taking public transit. I like rowhomes and apartment living. I like the east coast personalities better. It's not a warzone or a dumpsite, so a little dirtier and maybe a little more dangerous doesn't bother me. As long as you avoid North Philly and parts of West Philly, you won't have any trouble. And, for what I want in life and a city, a city like Philly fits me more. The top cities I'm looking for jobs in are Philly, Chicago, an Baltimore. I'm not interested in raising a family and weather doesn't bother me (except the heat in Texas, the SW, and Florida).

If I do stay in Louisville because I don't find a job outside the city, I plan on moving downtown. I really like how many new complexes are being built downtown and the 800 Tower renovations are amazing. So yeah, Louisville is changing, but it will never be on the level of a city like Philly or Chicago. Idk why people think I'm saying Louisville sucks and that I basically hate it here. I don't. I would LIKE to move to the east coast or Chicago after I graduate, but I won't kill myself if I don't. There are good things happening in this city and it's changing for the better. There are just cities out there that I like more.
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Old 08-30-2016, 06:56 AM
 
Location: My beloved Bluegrass
20,126 posts, read 16,167,528 times
Reputation: 28335
Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
It's safer and cleaner, but I like urban places more. I like the older historic urbanness of a city like Philly. I like walking and taking public transit. I like rowhomes and apartment living. I like the east coast personalities better. It's not a warzone or a dumpsite, so a little dirtier and maybe a little more dangerous doesn't bother me. As long as you avoid North Philly and parts of West Philly, you won't have any trouble. And, for what I want in life and a city, a city like Philly fits me more. The top cities I'm looking for jobs in are Philly, Chicago, an Baltimore. I'm not interested in raising a family and weather doesn't bother me (except the heat in Texas, the SW, and Florida).

If I do stay in Louisville because I don't find a job outside the city, I plan on moving downtown. I really like how many new complexes are being built downtown and the 800 Tower renovations are amazing. So yeah, Louisville is changing, but it will never be on the level of a city like Philly or Chicago. Idk why people think I'm saying Louisville sucks and that I basically hate it here. I don't. I would LIKE to move to the east coast or Chicago after I graduate, but I won't kill myself if I don't. There are good things happening in this city and it's changing for the better. There are just cities out there that I like more.
I do agree you would probably be the happiest in a major city. If you lived around here I would recommend Arlington or DC itself. I also think you would really like Baltimore from what you describe. It is probably the most affordable one of those you have listed. That, by the way, is the thing Louisville definitely has over most urban areas, a reasonable cost-of-living. I do hope you find a good place to land.

I totally get that some places are a much better fit for a person than others. There is nothing wrong with that whatsoever and we are fortunate in this country that we have so many different types of places to choose from, whether discussing size, climate, or culture. I don't mind at all if someone says they don't like a particular city or even the entire state of Kentucky. I do, however, mind very much if they do it in a way that involves insulting the people of the state or perpetuates ugly stereotypes. It is more than possible to discuss the negatives of an area, including its culture, without making it an attack on its people.
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When I post in bold red that is moderator action and, per the TOS, can only be discussed through Direct Message.Moderator - Diabetes and Kentucky (including Lexington & Louisville)
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Old 08-30-2016, 10:06 AM
 
8,256 posts, read 17,353,738 times
Reputation: 6225
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldhag1 View Post
I do agree you would probably be the happiest in a major city. If you lived around here I would recommend Arlington or DC itself. I also think you would really like Baltimore from what you describe. It is probably the most affordable one of those you have listed. That, by the way, is the thing Louisville definitely has over most urban areas, a reasonable cost-of-living. I do hope you find a good place to land.

I totally get that some places are a much better fit for a person than others. There is nothing wrong with that whatsoever and we are fortunate in this country that we have so many different types of places to choose from, whether discussing size, climate, or culture. I don't mind at all if someone says they don't like a particular city or even the entire state of Kentucky. I do, however, mind very much if they do it in a way that involves insulting the people of the state or perpetuates ugly stereotypes. It is more than possible to discuss the negatives of an area, including its culture, without making it an attack on its people.
DC/Arlington is too heavily concentrated with govt jobs for me to make any strides through the career paths there. I may apply there in the future, but right now I want to get a start somewhere else. Baltimore seems great though. I know it has its problems, but not many cities can compete with Baltimore for its rowhome neighborhoods and the really cool neighborhoods along the harbor.

I don't mean to constantly perpetuate the stereotype, but it is a fact that there are still some heavily conservative, racist, homophobic parts of KY. They exist in every state, no doubt. The most liberal of states have those places. CA has the Mojave Desert and Central Valley (minus Sac). NY State is run by NYC, but Upstate NY is very conservative. WA has liberal havens like Seattle, but eastern WA is conservative. My biggest thing is that I'm not USED to living in such close proximity to the types of people who wish it was legal to kill me because I'm an abomination. I mean hell, CA voted to BAN gay marriage thanks to the conservative inland counties, OC, inland LA, and inland/north SD. I know those type of people will always exist, but I just would prefer to not live so close to them. KY is still better than most other Southern states in that regard though. Every state has its heavily conservative racist homophobic areas, but then there are other states where it seems like that is the norm and there is no escaping it. I love KY for having Louisville and Lexington as pockets of liberalism. Some states (many) aren't so lucky.
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Old 09-01-2016, 05:50 PM
 
Location: Caverns measureless to man...
7,588 posts, read 6,631,916 times
Reputation: 17966
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldhag1 View Post
As my daughter was told in Northern VA, hardly a conservative bastion. There are, as of May 2016, 476,000+ more registered Democrats than Republicans in the state of Kentucky. There are 135,000 more registered Democrats than Republicans in Jefferson County. What do you say we try to refrain from engaging in false narratives? Kentucky may vote Republican nationally but they tend to register Democrat and vote that way locally. (Remember Kim Davis? She was a registered Democrat)
I don't really disagree with most of your recent posts in this thread, but I have to challenge this one. You're arguing that Kentucky is not as conservative as many people say it is, and supporting your argument by pointing out that there are many more registered Democrats than Republicans. And you're using Kim Davis as an example to prove your point.

Problem is, Kim Davis proves exactly the opposite point. Unless you're going to argue that a homophobic bible-thumping bigot like Kim Davis is some new species of liberal, she is living proof that in Kentucky, party affiliation does not necessarily correlate to liberal/conservative ideology. Democrats in Kentucky tend to be much more socially conservative than Democrats in most other parts of the country, and even more conservative than Republicans in some areas



Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
Jessem...I think you are probably being a bit unfair. Louisville is VERY progressive and accepting. For gosh sakes I remember the diversity of the driver's license branch. There was not but maybe one white person in there.
Sorry, but I can't agree - Louisville is not "very progressive" at all. It's very progressive compared to most of the rest of Kentucky, but not when compared to truly liberal areas of the country. "Accepting," yeah - I can't argue too much with that. People in this part of the country tend to be very self-sufficient, with a libertarian, "ain't none of my business" thang goin' on, and in my experience that does seem to translate into a surprisingly strong tradition of acceptance for such a conservative area.

Your reference to the gay population and the number of mosques certainly has some significance, and I won't discount it. But I don't think it's as significant as you think it is. I think it's more a measure of the "acceptance" factor than the "progressive" factor. Every state in the country is going to have a certain number of gays and a certain number of muslims, and they all have to live somewhere. It makes sense that large numbers of them would concentrate in whatever part of the state is most welcoming and accepting of them, and for Kentucky, that's Louisville. But Louisville is still much more socially conservative than most similarly-sized northern, west coast, or eastern cities.
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Old 09-01-2016, 06:13 PM
 
Location: My beloved Bluegrass
20,126 posts, read 16,167,528 times
Reputation: 28335
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. In-Between View Post
I don't really disagree with most of your recent posts in this thread, but I have to challenge this one. You're arguing that Kentucky is not as conservative as many people say it is, and supporting your argument by pointing out that there are many more registered Democrats than Republicans. And you're using Kim Davis as an example to prove your point.

Problem is, Kim Davis proves exactly the opposite point. Unless you're going to argue that a homophobic bible-thumping bigot like Kim Davis is some new species of liberal, she is living proof that in Kentucky, party affiliation does not necessarily correlate to liberal/conservative ideology. Democrats in Kentucky tend to be much more socially conservative than Democrats in most other parts of the country, and even more conservative than Republicans in some areas.
No, I was responding to a post that claimed a classmate being advised to remove work with the Democratic Party from her resume was proof that Kentucky was ultra conservative and she wouldn't be hired because they would think she was liberal based on being a Democrat. My argument was that while Kentucky indeed may vote red nationally (conservative/Republican) they are still registering Democrat (conservative/Blue Dog Democrat) - in other words, party affiliation doesn't carry the same meaning in Kentucky that it would in, say, California. In Kentucky registered political party in no indication of where you sit on the liberal-conservative scale and most people, including local law firms, are very aware of that.

We are in agreement.
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When I post in bold red that is moderator action and, per the TOS, can only be discussed through Direct Message.Moderator - Diabetes and Kentucky (including Lexington & Louisville)
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Old 09-01-2016, 07:27 PM
 
Location: Caverns measureless to man...
7,588 posts, read 6,631,916 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldhag1 View Post
No, I was responding to a post that claimed a classmate being advised to remove work with the Democratic Party from her resume was proof that Kentucky was ultra conservative and she wouldn't be hired because they would think she was liberal based on being a Democrat. My argument was that while Kentucky indeed may vote red nationally (conservative/Republican) they are still registering Democrat (conservative/Blue Dog Democrat) - in other words, party affiliation doesn't carry the same meaning in Kentucky that it would in, say, California. In Kentucky registered political party in no indication of where you sit on the liberal-conservative scale and most people, including local law firms, are very aware of that.

We are in agreement.

Oh, I'm really sorry. I got that completely wrong.

It's an interesting subject, though. The terms "liberal" and "conservative" almost have unique meanings in Kentucky. I have a lot of friends up in the mountains who are lifelong democrats, and have the strangest blend of social and political principles one could imagine. For example, most of them think gays are sinners of the worst kind, bound to burn in hell for all eternity - but if a gay's car broke down on the road in front of their house, they'd bring him in, feed him, make a bed for him, and the next morning fix his car for him. And if they couldn't fix it, they'd drive him 30 miles into town after feeding him breakfast. And they would see absolutely no contradiction in that scenario - in fact, they would be offended and probably think there was something wrong with you if you were confused by it.

Strange place, in many ways. Mostly very good people, but the labels that people are accustomed to using often don't apply at all. Folks in these parts make up their own labels for themselves, and they pick and choose what does and does not go on that label. It takes a while to understand, but it's worth the time and effort.
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