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Old 06-02-2006, 05:28 PM
 
Location: The Miami Of Canada
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I am seriously thinking about relocating to either Lexington or Louisville Kentucky, but can anyone tell me if either of those cities are in any way similar to Chicago (big city feeling)? I might have a job prospect or two and would just like to feel more at home if I do move (if possible). I assume that the weather is milder than Chicago (less snow) but please tell me if I'm wrong about that!
Thanks!

-itchick
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Old 06-07-2006, 08:34 PM
 
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Well, Chicago doesnt have a big city feel, it has a HUGE city feel
(To me at least)

You mentioned Lexington as well as Louisville. In my opinion, Lexington feels quite a bit like Boston, meaning it feels like a campus town. Louisville however, is more Urban. So, I suppose Louisville is nore like Chicago then Lexington.

Louisville is great in City Services, and has the best mayor in the Country. (Also just "my" opinion )

The state of Kentucky is also great as far as states go. Kentucky is big on Education, with a lot of free money for education to pretty much anyone.

The education system in Louisville is actually one of the largest in the Country, and is known as the Jefferson County Public School System.
http://www.jefferson.k12.ky.us/

Louisville is Rapidly expanding, and its very easy to find a job. I also find that people are a lot more friendly here then they are in Chicago.

Anyways, I feel like I am rambling on. Feel free to Email me at ArthurBenevicci@gmail.comif you would like more information
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Old 06-08-2006, 12:39 PM
 
Location: The Miami Of Canada
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Thanks ArthurBenevicci for replying to my post! I recieved job offers for Lexington and Louisville, so that is why I asked about both places. Now I have to research rent prices and safe locations.

One question I haven't been able to get a definite answer to: how cold and how much snow in the winter time (and when does your spring really start)? I heard Kentucky gets a few icestorms that can make driving really dangerous. Is that typical for all of wintertime or just occasionally?

Thanks!
-itchick
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Old 06-17-2006, 11:41 AM
 
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I'd have to say nothing in Kentucky is anything like Chicago, but Louisville is definitely more urban than other towns in the state. Lexington is...well...it's a college town, so has more of the feel of say Madison, WI or Durham, NC (without the diversity of Durham).

If arts, concerts, shopping, restaurants are important to you, I'd suggest Louisville over Lexington.

Rent prices are going to be all over the map, as will the age and condition of the rentals. You probably want to stay away from right on the river in Louisville. It's no longer uncommon for people to live in another county and commute in, but then you lose that urban feel.

Winters are going to be a cakewalk compared to Chicago (my SIL lived in Chicago, so I've heard the stories.) It can drop down to below freezing at night in dead of winter, but those snaps seldom last long.

Even though there is not that many miles in between them, Louisville and Lexington are in different microclimates, so the weater is different. The ice storms are more in Lexington; Louisville is more likely to get snow than ice in winter. Both can get some incredible storms in spring and summer. Louisville is more humid in summer (due to the river). Sure, driving in the ice is dangerous. No doubt about it. IMO, though what makes it more dangerous is that the foul weather is rare enough that most people aren't used to driving in it and so don't have the skills that people up north would have from driving in long, snowy winters. In fact, you'll probably get a little frustrated that the whole town tends to go into panic mode when it snows.

Spring's usually is fully here by the end of April. The last two years have been a little goofy, though, and we've just started hitting mid 80s in the day in the last two weeks.
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Old 06-17-2006, 01:00 PM
 
Location: The Miami Of Canada
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Thank You ymbk for the all the details! It's really appreciated!

It seems like I might feel more at home in Louisville, based on your descriptions. That really helps me in the decision making process. Now I have to decide between KY or NC for relocation. I may end up having to go where the job offers are, which is in KY.

As long as there is less snow and very few days of zero temps in winter, I know I'll be happy.
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Old 06-17-2006, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Texas
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The winters are not that bad here. We get an occassional ice storm and light snow. Every now and then we may get 6 inches of snow, rarely do we get more than that. What ever snow we get usually melts away fairly quickly. Occassionaly we do get some 0 degree temps in winter but it is not a daily or a yearly event. Temps usually start warming up a little in March with fluctuations back and forth. They continue to fluctuate back and forth through June, sometimes until the beginning of July, with the cooler temps getting a little less cool and the warmer temps getting more hot with each fluctuation. When July gets here things usually heat up and stay that way until Sept. By the end of September they start to cool slightly and begin the fluctuation process in reverse. Occassionaly we have had a cold spell come through as early as Oct. but that does not happen often and does not last. November is when you are more likely to see some winter temps but even then the temps still fluctuate between warm, cool, and cold. December is cold and the fluctuations in temps ends (with the exception of the degrees of cold).

We do have an earthquake fault line. There have been some slight tremors since we have lived here but never anything major. In fact, you most likely won't even realize there was a tremble until the news tells you. These do not happen often. We do get some incredible storms in the spring and fall, mostly due to the fluctuations between cool and warm fronts. These bring lots of lightning and sometimes hail and tornados.

Louisville has the KY Center for the Arts, Thunder Over Louisville, The Pegasus Parade, the KY Derby, the KY State Fair, lots of good restaurants, and more. University of Louisville is also there. There are lots of good hospitals too.

I can't give much info on Lexington. It was ranked the number 1 place for single women several years ago. A lot of my friends that enjoy places like Maryland, Virginia, and the New England states say they feel more at home with the people in Lexington.
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Old 06-17-2006, 01:30 PM
 
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Lexington is a little friendlier, IMO, but Louisville is more alive and progressive.

Oh, I lived in NC for over 30 years! Drop me an email if you have more questions about KY or NC. I've not been back to NC in a while, but I still have friends and relatives there and try to keep up with what's going on there.

addy is r_yaaresse (at) yahoo (dot) com
I check that address every day or two.
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Old 06-19-2006, 08:24 PM
 
Location: The Miami Of Canada
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Thanks for all the info about KY, Jewels36 and ymbk!

For those who have offered me their e-mail addresses to contact them, I would like to ask if I could PM you here instead (or you can PM me) rather then deal with e-mail. Thanks!
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Old 06-21-2006, 02:10 AM
 
Location: Old Louisville
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Quick Facts about Louisville:

Louisville (pronounced lu evel) is Kentucky's largest city.
Population (2004): 556,332
Density: 1,592.6/km²
Metro: 1.2 million

The settlement that became the City of Louisville was founded in 1778 by George Rogers Clark and is named after King Louis XVI. Because of its proximity to Indiana, the metropolitan area around Louisville is regularly referred to as Kentuckiana.

Louisville's weather is temperate and seasonal. Summers are hot and humid with cool evenings. The mean annual temperature is 56 °F (13 °C), with an average annual snowfall of 16.4 inches (41 cm) and an average annual rainfall of 44.53 inches (1131 mm). The wettest seasons are the spring and summer, although rainfall is fairly constant all year round. During the winter, particularly in January and February, several days of snow can be expected, allowing for winter sports. Winter temperatures range from 27 to 43 °F (−3 to 6 °C) and summer temperatures range from 66 and 86 °F (19 and 30 °C).

In terms of urban development and city layout, Louisville is a melting pot of old and new. Louisville boasts a large number of parks, with 122 parks covering more than 14,000 acres (57 km²). The city's architecture contains a blend of old and new (similar to many parts of Chicago). The Old Louisville neighborhood is the largest historic preservation district solely featuring Victorian homes and buildings in the United States, it is also the fourth largest such district overall. There are many modern skyscrapers downtown, as well as older preserved structures. If you google "Louisville Skyline", you can see the front part of our commerical district. It is important to note though that the downtown forms more of a T shape, so some building are obscured. Louisville lays claims to 12 of KY's 15 buildings that are over 300 feet and will add another (the Museum Plaza) in 2010.

Many geographers consider Louisville to be Kentucky's primate city, since 17%of the state's population lives in Jefferson County and 25% live in counties in the Louisville CSA, and also Jefferson County has 2.5 times more people than Kentucky's second most populous county, Fayette County (a.k.a Lexington).

Culturally speaking, Louisville is a hodgepodge. Perhaps the best way to describe it is "the souths most northern city and the north's most southern city". The city is home to a thriving and vibrant arts scene and is host to St. James Court Art Show. The Speed Art Museum opened in 1927 and is the oldest and largest art museum in the state of Kentucky. Located adjacent to the University of Louisville, the museum features over 1,200 pieces of art in its permanent collection. 21C and the museum plaza have also increased Louisville's reputation as a culutrally diverse and artistic city. The performing arts community in Louisville is currently undergoing a bit of a renaissance. The Kentucky Center, dedicated in 1983, located in the downtown hotel and entertainment district, features a variety of plays and concerts. This is also the home of the Louisville Ballet, Louisville Orchestra, and the Kentucky Opera, which is the twelfth oldest opera in the United States. Actors Theatre of Louisville is another performing arts center that has become the cornerstone of the revitalization of Louisville's Main Street. As the centerpiece of the city's urban cultural district, Actors Theatre has significant economic impact on a vital downtown life. Highly acclaimed for its artistic programming and business acumen, Actors Theatre hosts the Humana Festival of New American Plays each Spring. It also presents approximately six hundred performances of about thirty productions during its year-round season, composed of a diverse array of contemporary and classical fare. Also on Fourth Street is the brand new Fourth Street Live! outdoor entertainment complex, which features a wide variety of restaurants, stores and nightclubs. The complex sponsors many free concerts, as does the popular Waterfront Park.
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Old 06-21-2006, 02:11 AM
 
Location: Old Louisville
108 posts, read 715,978 times
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The Louisville Waterfront Park is prominently located on the banks of the Ohio River near downtown, and features large open areas, which often feature free concerts and other festivals. Cherokee Park is also one of the larger parks in the city, covering 409 acres (1.7 km²), and features many bicycle and nature trails, basketball courts, baseball fields, and picnic pavilions.

In terms of sports, Kentucky in general is a college sports state. College sports are very popular in greater Louisville, with an enormous following for the University of Louisville Cardinals (you'll find out about that soon enough). Horse racing is also a major attraction. Churchill Downs is home to the Kentucky Derby, the largest sports event in the state, as well as the Kentucky Oaks which together cap the two-week-long Kentucky Derby Festival. The Louisville Bats are a baseball team playing in the International League as the Class AAA affiliate of the Cincinnati Reds. The team plays at Louisville Slugger Field at the edge of the city's downtown.

Louisville also plays host to the annual KY state fair, Thunder over Louisville (start of the Kentucky Derby Festival and the largest fireworks display in the U.S.), asd well as the famous Kentucky derby.

Thanks to wikipedia for most of the info ;-) Now my personal opinion of the city. Having moved to Louisville for school (U of L) from a small rural city in Northern Kentucky, I can devinately tell you that Louisville is very different culturally and socially from the rest of the state. It is a blend of Northern urbanization and southern style/hospitality. Often times, Louisville feels like a large city that still has a tint of small city about it (though the small city part is much more pronounced in Lexington). If you are looking for an expanding city, that is a mix of Urban culture/architecture, has a thriving arts scenes, but still has some aspects of small town life (great school system, low crime rate compared with other, larger midwestern cities, etc..), Louisville would be your choice.
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