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Kingsport - Johnson City - Bristol The Tri-Cities area
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Old 07-02-2012, 05:53 PM
 
Location: Northeast Tennessee
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Well I was surprised no one has posted this little fact before, but the Tri-Cities airport set an all-time record high of 103° on Saturday. This broke the old record of 102° that was set back in 1952 and tied on Friday the 29th.

We had readings as high as 106° in Bristol.
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Old 07-03-2012, 11:45 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tennesseestorm View Post
Well I was surprised no one has posted this little fact before, but the Tri-Cities airport set an all-time record high of 103° on Saturday. This broke the old record of 102° that was set back in 1952 and tied on Friday the 29th.

We had readings as high as 106° in Bristol.
wow, with the humidity, that must be very miserable. 103 is bad enough when it's not humid!
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Old 07-03-2012, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Seattle
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The Walgreens in Johnson City read 111. I'm not sure how accurate that was, but it sure felt every bit of it.
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Old 07-03-2012, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Kingsport, TN
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Originally Posted by 370z View Post
wow, with the humidity, that must be very miserable. 103 is bad enough when it's not humid!
The humidity (23%) and dew point (58) weren't bad when we hit 103, so it wasn't nearly as miserable as it could've been.
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Old 07-04-2012, 04:57 PM
 
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Originally Posted by kamoshika View Post
The humidity (23%) and dew point (58) weren't bad when we hit 103, so it wasn't nearly as miserable as it could've been.
That's good, that the humidity wasn't high 23% doesn't sound bad to me! Isn't the humidity usually the worst in August & Sept.?
This may sound ignorant, but what does the "dew point" effect??Thanks.
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Old 07-04-2012, 06:27 PM
 
13 posts, read 33,869 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 370z View Post
That's good, that the humidity wasn't high 23% doesn't sound bad to me! Isn't the humidity usually the worst in August & Sept.?
This may sound ignorant, but what does the "dew point" effect??Thanks.
Dewpoint is a true measure of the moisture in the air. Humidity is usually measured in relative humidity, so it is a function of temperature and moisture. You can have really dry air outside (like in the winter for example), yet the relative humidity is still near 100% when the temperature is close to the dewpoint. In that example, the air would be saturated but the actual moisture content would be very low. In a way, the relative humidity doesn’t really tell you how “humid” it feels outside. The feeling of being “humid” is more a result of how high the dewpoint is. Increasing the dewpoint at a certain temperature produces a higher relative humidity value.

Basically, when the dewpoint gets above 65 degrees then people usually say “it’s humid”. That’s about the level at which the heat index starts getting significantly above the actual temperature.

We usually have humid conditions with high temperatures, but this recent heat wave had dry air because of the dry soil conditions and the source region of the air was dry. The dry air allowed for such extreme temperatures because dry air warms easier than moist air. Hope that helps.
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Old 07-05-2012, 12:15 PM
 
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Originally Posted by GvilleTN View Post
Dewpoint is a true measure of the moisture in the air. Humidity is usually measured in relative humidity, so it is a function of temperature and moisture. You can have really dry air outside (like in the winter for example), yet the relative humidity is still near 100% when the temperature is close to the dewpoint. In that example, the air would be saturated but the actual moisture content would be very low. In a way, the relative humidity doesn’t really tell you how “humid” it feels outside. The feeling of being “humid” is more a result of how high the dewpoint is. Increasing the dewpoint at a certain temperature produces a higher relative humidity value.

Basically, when the dewpoint gets above 65 degrees then people usually say “it’s humid”. That’s about the level at which the heat index starts getting significantly above the actual temperature.

We usually have humid conditions with high temperatures, but this recent heat wave had dry air because of the dry soil conditions and the source region of the air was dry. The dry air allowed for such extreme temperatures because dry air warms easier than moist air. Hope that helps.
Yes it does.Thank you so much.
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Old 07-26-2012, 12:33 PM
 
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Is the humidity really bad out there? Moving from dry and low humidity San Diego, Ca. I lived in Kansas City, Mo for a year or two and it was like you're in a sauna! Went to Superman Celebration in Metroplois, ILL last summer and my hair was soaked! Will I survive Johnson City?
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Old 07-26-2012, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Gray, TN
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Yes, yesterday was a sauna day, felt like a tropical rainforest. We are probably more humid than either KC or Metropolis.

However, the day in the first post of this thread was very dry.
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Old 07-26-2012, 02:39 PM
 
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We can't afford SoCal so we chose this area and we have 10 personal friends in the area so that's a great start but my husband and I get migraines so the humidity is awful for us but we have no other choice unless we get rich all of a sudden! There's always Walmart and malls to cool off!
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