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Old 06-13-2008, 07:42 PM
 
Location: Beautiful East TN!!
7,281 posts, read 19,575,181 times
Reputation: 2761

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jabogitlu View Post
That capitalist momentum is probably alive in well in parts of Knoxville. As much as I hate to perpetuate the stereotype, it sounds like Farragut, to me. But as a former resident, and frequent visitor, I have to say that, to me, Knoxville is pretty laid-back about things like the right car or the right boat (who can afford a boat, anyway?). Of course, I've always lived in blue collar-esque east Knoxville and/or studentville The Fort. I was downtown last night and it was pretty darn laid back, save the two or three hellfire and brimstone preachers shouting on the streetcorners.

I agree with your Asheville assessment. It is now the mecca for the New Age movement and all that entails. But from the OP's post I (thought I) gathered a more moderate, centrist view, which Knoxville would, as a city with lots of different sorts of people (Farragut v Maryville v Fountain City), fulfill well enough. At least one of the best in the area.

Maybe what I was trying to say, in a rather roundabout and cryptic way, is that if you move to Asheville/Black Mtn/Hville, you're stuck with that. It's just a city the way it is. In Knoxville, it's easier to distance yourself from different subcultures and move between them.
Good analysis, great assessment of both areas and I just had to second everything you said.
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Old 06-14-2008, 08:39 AM
 
Location: Johnson City, TN
295 posts, read 667,661 times
Reputation: 173
Mouse and jab,
Don't misunderstand my remarks on Knoxville being just for capitalists. From my visits I see a city like you describe. Diverse. People in big fine homes up overlooking the river with Maseratis and Mercedes and boats to people who care little about those things to people who can't even afford a 'Hooptie' mobile in Western Heights and other spots. There are spiffy new communities sprawling outside of town there with all the eminities ready to go and older parts where they are/have fixed up the charming old homes.
I just thought the original poster may want to consider Asheville if coming from SoCal and finding people more like that was a big consideration. In my opinion Asheville has a more [vocal] left wing [majority?] population from poor bohemians on up to Limosine liberals and a person with more conservative view points might find themselves a bit outnumbered and again IMHO they may like east TN better for more of a balance of world views or even a conservative bias but someone with a more liberal world view may be more comfortable in Asheville.
Knoxville environs are a nice balance of city entertainment, work and convenience but you have lakes nearby and can get up into the mountains fairly quickly too.
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Old 06-14-2008, 08:39 AM
 
14 posts, read 33,883 times
Reputation: 16
Default wow i feel a yankee brother

Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthernLights View Post
I just stumbled on to this forum today and this is one of the areas I can comment on being from Maryland as I have an outsider's perspective from an urban Democrat state which surrounds the politicians, the "Beltway Bandits" as they are called up home. If you are very liberal, more in the "left coast" tradition you may feel a lot more comfortable spending time in Asheville NC, 50 minutes down the road. Always a good protest going on downtown or in the editorial pages along the lines of Iraq, or Global Warming or the government being mean to the trees, bugs and bunnies, etc., lots of 'Bohemian types' and limosine liberals down there. May feel a bit more 'Cali' or New York City down there to you.
NE TN appears to be the conservative third of an otherwise "Blue" state. In spite of the few rebel flags you'll see proudly displayed, historically NE TN and Western NC did not wish to succede the Union acc. to my research. They had no slaves and plantations and in spite of being the Volunteer state didn't see any reason to go fight the plantation owner's war for them but in the end had no choice but to go along with all the states around them. The folks in NE TN were isolated by poor roads and for the longest time, few Railroads, and lived kind of in a vacuum which I think they preferred in some ways until they brought in the railroads to cut down all the trees and remove the iron ore from the mountains. For more on this kind of history there is a very good website called JohnsonDepot or something like that. I do not have the link handy but it can explain the local history nicely, good website.
Being from a northern state where church attendance is pretty low that is a bit different. People I've met around here are Christians and pretty secure in their faith but other than a few "church ladies" I've met don't seem too interested in converting you. Me personally, I find it great as I can go to Home Depot or Lowe's on a Sunday morning and have the store pretty much to myself. The locals seem to be in church or hiding in their homes so their neighbors/relations don't see that they didn't go to church. Being a Godless heathen I find it handy for Sunday morning shopping trips. They say this is the Bible Belt and geographically it's true but there are many more places in the south where it is much more "in your face" in the media and you see the Mega churches. You will have to change your way of speaking if you are from the Northeast and swear a good bit God Damn makes people wince and the F bomb can cause fainting amongst some members of the community. Other than that I'd say folks are not as tolerant of interracial couples but you probably won't have crosses burned on your front lawn and you may not want to drive around with a rainbow sticker on your bumper but it doesn't seem too bad in comparison to other places I've been in the south.
Other than that it's mostly little things you'll notice, TN drivers tailgate you like their all "drafting" at Bristol Motor Speedway and southern drivers in general consider traffic lights more of a suggestion and than a command, sitting for a while after it turns green and then running the red [which is of course why they all sit there for a second or two after it turns green] These little things will be outweighed in my opinion by the other southern behaviors such as their friendliness and almost unnerving [to a northerner] eye contact with you. I have found these folks quick to say hello but reserved to 'let you in' and be careful as folks are easy to offend where northerners are used to people being able to take sarcasm and double meanings where down here folks seem pretty literal and what you may feel is a joke may be taken to heart. Once offended folks here don't forget it either. Still, like I said, subtle differences just go slow with people you meet and you should love it here.

i had to giggle when i read the comment about the f bomb, me being from new jersey and you are so right sarcasm is taken personally
the people here do treat me wel,l they do all call me yankee tho
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Old 06-14-2008, 08:50 AM
 
Location: Johnson City, TN
295 posts, read 667,661 times
Reputation: 173
tennesseenow wrote;
"i had to giggle when i read the comment about the f bomb being from new jersey and you are so right sarcasm is taken personally the people here do treat me well they do all call me yankee tho"


'From Jersey? F--kin' A. You know what I mean.
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Old 06-14-2008, 10:26 AM
 
Location: Beautiful East TN!!
7,281 posts, read 19,575,181 times
Reputation: 2761
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthernLights View Post
Mouse and jab,
Don't misunderstand my remarks on Knoxville being just for capitalists. From my visits I see a city like you describe. Diverse. People in big fine homes up overlooking the river with Maseratis and Mercedes and boats to people who care little about those things to people who can't even afford a 'Hooptie' mobile in Western Heights and other spots. There are spiffy new communities sprawling outside of town there with all the eminities ready to go and older parts where they are/have fixed up the charming old homes.
I just thought the original poster may want to consider Asheville if coming from SoCal and finding people more like that was a big consideration. In my opinion Asheville has a more [vocal] left wing [majority?] population from poor bohemians on up to Limosine liberals and a person with more conservative view points might find themselves a bit outnumbered and again IMHO they may like east TN better for more of a balance of world views or even a conservative bias but someone with a more liberal world view may be more comfortable in Asheville.
Knoxville environs are a nice balance of city entertainment, work and convenience but you have lakes nearby and can get up into the mountains fairly quickly too.

I don't think I misunderstood any remarks nor was I disagreeing with you by any means. I was just agreeing with his assesment. I can see your point too. However we have those "keep up with the Jones" neighborhoods here in the Tri-Cities too. Yet I believe even those neighborhoods in the majority of East TN, including both Knoxville and Tri-Cities, they are sill more of a conservitive nature than Asheville over all. More of a live and let live attitude in both areas. Some choose to live the "Keep up the the Joneses" attitude and are still accepted by and accept others and vise versa. To me, THAT is diversity, acceptance of different thought processes. I know in a lot of instances when people ask about "diversity" that are talking about skin color or nationality, but I personaly think of "diversity" in terms of thought process. Even though on one topic there is less diversity here as far as conservative verses liberal, on other topics there is a whole lot of diversity as far as choice of way of life. Make sence? In all essesnce, I believe we are all saying the same thing. "If you want more liberal views and more of a similar life style to everyone else around you, look to Asheville. If you want a larger mix of thoughts, likes and dislikes yet more conservative, look to East TN." LOL!.


Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthernLights View Post
tennesseenow wrote;
"i had to giggle when i read the comment about the f bomb being from new jersey and you are so right sarcasm is taken personally the people here do treat me well they do all call me yankee tho"


'From Jersey? F--kin' A. You know what I mean.

I am originally from CT, so yea, I know what you mean LOL! However that is also a good point of difference between that part of New England and NE TN. Here you will still hear the phrase" I would say, but not in mixed company". It adds to the charm and politeness that is often referenced to here as something that draws one to this area. Sure that phrase (yours above) and others like it are common place up there, I personally am not offended by it, however it is nice not to hear it here as commonplace.
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Old 06-16-2008, 10:17 AM
 
Location: Seattle
6,514 posts, read 14,754,259 times
Reputation: 2841
I hate that phrase! I am not very conservative-minded and have to censor myself around "mixed company" , but that phrase just makes absolutely no sense to me at all. Guess it's a Southern v. Northern thing. <g>
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Old 06-17-2008, 09:22 PM
 
22 posts, read 66,686 times
Reputation: 16
I think the only true culture shock I experienced was the influence of religion. Religion is ever present in this area. This is meant as a truly neutral statement - not positive or negative. But this is truly the bible belt and it is seen in many overt and subtle ways. If you are looking for the more open minded city - choose JC. I even venture to guess that development will increase quicker in JC than the other cities (Bristol, KPT, Greeneville). But things seem to move a lot slower in this area.
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Old 06-17-2008, 09:56 PM
 
Location: Beautiful East TN!!
7,281 posts, read 19,575,181 times
Reputation: 2761
Hehhehehe I can give you two great examples of "culture shock" that I experienced/noticed today. Didn't shock me at all, but it might others so I just have to share.
For lunch we called in an order into the Dairy Cup in Mount Carmel (Best burgers ever!!!!) and I had two bags and a drink tray along with my purse heading to the door to leave and thought "how the heck am I going to get this out the door and to the car with out dropping it?" They have a glass door, I saw through it that there were two young men, maybe 17 or 19 years old, sports attired, 1 hats on backward, 1 sideways, shorts look more like pants, being loud, unshaven....you know, typical young men of our day. Well, I felt relieved as I saw them because I banked on what came next. As I approached the door going out, they almost got to the door to enter. The one stepped forward faster to open the door for me, they both stepped aside so I could pass with my hands full. I looked up and said "Thank you", he answered the standard "Yes ma'am". And he went right back to being boisterous with his buddy. To some coming from some other states, THAT would be culture shock.
The second thing was I was standing in the Sullivan Co water Dept today waiting on some paper work for a client. I looked around and saw at least 5 items of religious nature......for those not familiar with it, Kingsport water Dept is in the courthouse/city building. These items were either pictures or printed out scripture quotes taped close to the tellers work station, aimed out to the customers. Again, to some coming from some states, this could be considered "culture shock", here it is just normal.
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Old 06-18-2008, 07:20 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
35,764 posts, read 35,553,529 times
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Let me ask you something - If a conservative, religious, bluegrass/country-loving, barbecue-eating, NRA member native Tennessee man and his family moved from small town Tennessee to NYC or San Francisco/Los Angeles or Chicago or Baltimore, how do you think they would fit in?

Now let's say you live in a suburban location (population about 25,000) near one of those big cities and a bunch of people from Tennessee/Alabama/Arkansas/Mississippi were watching TV one day and there's Andy Griffith up there on the screen telling you about these two great new master planned communities going up near the beach on Long Island, NY for example's (but you could subsitute a California or Maryland town) sake. So you and about a thousand other southern families get in your pickup trucks and move to Long Island, NY.

The developer got a special permit to build the master planned communities near the wetlands and oops, blocked off the access to the beach the locals have been using for years and removed the trees. Too bad, you locals will just have to go sunbathing and swimming 15 miles down the road at that other public Long Island beach. Then the developer puts up a big gate around the community to keep out you local Long Island undesirables. The newcomers post, "You'll just have to deal with it. We're coming whether you like it or not." The locals steam.

The newcomers arrive and look around. "Boy, is it flat here and you sure have a lot of traffic on that Long Island Expressway. Doesn't 'expressway' mean you move fast?" say the newcomers who didn't do much pre-move research, as they post in City Data. The locals steam.

Then the newcomers notice they can't get any bluegrass or country music on the radio station, there are no concerts with that kind of music and try as they might, it's tough to find any restaurants that do country cooking/barbecue. They ask about storytelling, living history or battle re-enactment events and the local people look at them like they have three heads. "There's no diversity or culture here," the newcomers whine on City-Data forums. "Plus, these Long Island people are uneducated about their history. And have you listened to those youse guys, whaddya doin' accents? They call water, "wawtuh." I feel like I moved to a third world country. I'm afraid to put my kids in their schools. Do you know any GOOD schools in the area?" The locals steam.

Then the newcomers put little Travis, Billie Jean and Robbie Lee in school as do the other thousand southern families that moved to the master planned communities on Long Island, NY. Pretty soon, the principal and local politicians are telling everybody, they need more schools on Long Island to accommodate the newcomer's children. Plus, with all the newcomers they're going to need to widen a few roads, build a new firehouse and get some more police. The property tax is going up, up, up! The locals who have lived there since they were kids, steam.

Ten months later on City Data: "I heard a rumor that we might be getting a Piggly Wiggly on Long Island, " says one newcomer in a forum post. "Oh, glory day!" says newcomer poster Number 2. "Finally, a REAL store with good food!" "What a culture shock it has been living here on Long Island!"

Catch my drift?
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Old 06-18-2008, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Telford, TN
1,065 posts, read 3,563,088 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
Let me ask you something - If a conservative, religious, bluegrass/country-loving, barbecue-eating, NRA member native Tennessee man and his family moved from small town Tennessee to NYC or San Francisco/Los Angeles or Chicago or Baltimore, how do you think they would fit in?

Now let's say you live in a suburban location (population about 25,000) near one of those big cities and a bunch of people from Tennessee/Alabama/Arkansas/Mississippi were watching TV one day and there's Andy Griffith up there on the screen telling you about these two great new master planned communities going up near the beach on Long Island, NY for example's (but you could subsitute a California or Maryland town) sake. So you and about a thousand other southern families get in your pickup trucks and move to Long Island, NY.

The developer got a special permit to build the master planned communities near the wetlands and oops, blocked off the access to the beach the locals have been using for years and removed the trees. Too bad, you locals will just have to go sunbathing and swimming 15 miles down the road at that other public Long Island beach. Then the developer puts up a big gate around the community to keep out you local Long Island undesirables. The newcomers post, "You'll just have to deal with it. We're coming whether you like it or not." The locals steam.

The newcomers arrive and look around. "Boy, is it flat here and you sure have a lot of traffic on that Long Island Expressway. Doesn't 'expressway' mean you move fast?" say the newcomers who didn't do much pre-move research, as they post in City Data. The locals steam.

Then the newcomers notice they can't get any bluegrass or country music on the radio station, there are no concerts with that kind of music and try as they might, it's tough to find any restaurants that do country cooking/barbecue. They ask about storytelling, living history or battle re-enactment events and the local people look at them like they have three heads. "There's no diversity or culture here," the newcomers whine on City-Data forums. "Plus, these Long Island people are uneducated about their history. And have you listened to those youse guys, whaddya doin' accents? They call water, "wawtuh." I feel like I moved to a third world country. I'm afraid to put my kids in their schools. Do you know any GOOD schools in the area?" The locals steam.

Then the newcomers put little Travis, Billie Jean and Robbie Lee in school as do the other thousand southern families that moved to the master planned communities on Long Island, NY. Pretty soon, the principal and local politicians are telling everybody, they need more schools on Long Island to accommodate the newcomer's children. Plus, with all the newcomers they're going to need to widen a few roads, build a new firehouse and get some more police. The property tax is going up, up, up! The locals who have lived there since they were kids, steam.

Ten months later on City Data: "I heard a rumor that we might be getting a Piggly Wiggly on Long Island, " says one newcomer in a forum post. "Oh, glory day!" says newcomer poster Number 2. "Finally, a REAL store with good food!" "What a culture shock it has been living here on Long Island!"

Catch my drift?
This was excellent. I've never laughed so much. If you don't get paid for your writing, you should. That was really good. And, I happen to be a newcomer from FL waiting for a Publix to open. LOL
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