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Old 01-12-2013, 10:51 PM
 
249 posts, read 369,549 times
Reputation: 235

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I hear and read all of the time that people in Las Vegas do not know their neighbors and keep to themselves. It is absolutely possible to have a sense of community here-- with a little effort. I moved to my street about a year and a half ago-- it was a new street and everyone had lived here under a year (I was the last house on the street to be occupied-- six houses total on a culdesac. I personally know all of my neighbors even though we all work different hours, some have young kids, some have grown kids, some have no kids. I speak regularly with the residents of three of the houses, and semi-regularly with the residents of the other two houses. It's a very quiet neighborhood (although not in a gated community)--- I'm very happy that I live on this street--- it's all what you make of it-- if everyone put in more of an effort, it can be done. I remember election night, I had the neighbors in one house texting that they were mad about the presidential election, another house's residents were texting about being thrilled about the presidential candidates. They all asked my opinion on the judicial races--- we all wished each other happy holidays, and we all look out for each other when there is a strange car on the street.

I wish everyone else who complains about not knowing their neighbors would make more of an effort to find common ground--- we don't share the same religions, views on politics, and we all work different hours--- but have found a way to become a true community. I hope that all of you are able to find the same--- I love my neighborhood!
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Old 01-12-2013, 10:56 PM
 
4,938 posts, read 10,037,760 times
Reputation: 8536
They oughta make that post a sign and post it on every single street corner in this town.

P E R F E C T.
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Old 01-12-2013, 11:29 PM
 
654 posts, read 1,168,779 times
Reputation: 484
Well Girlesq, I want dollar bills to float down on rainy days too.
The fact is Las Vegas is a very transient city. People hate it, people love it! Its either or, not in between. People don't know how long they will be in Vegas so why waste the time and energy. We all work different hours, so its a logistical mess to get together. I lived in my home 8 years and I have seen everyone of my neighbors move in and out and subsequent renters/owners leave too!
Sure, a new housing community you will have this cohesiveness but after a year or 2, neighbors start doing the moving shuffle.
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Old 01-13-2013, 01:33 AM
 
Location: Bangkok, NYC, and LV
2,037 posts, read 2,775,295 times
Reputation: 1128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Girlesq View Post
I hear and read all of the time that people in Las Vegas do not know their neighbors and keep to themselves. It is absolutely possible to have a sense of community here-- with a little effort. I moved to my street about a year and a half ago-- it was a new street and everyone had lived here under a year (I was the last house on the street to be occupied-- six houses total on a culdesac. I personally know all of my neighbors even though we all work different hours, some have young kids, some have grown kids, some have no kids. I speak regularly with the residents of three of the houses, and semi-regularly with the residents of the other two houses. It's a very quiet neighborhood (although not in a gated community)--- I'm very happy that I live on this street--- it's all what you make of it-- if everyone put in more of an effort, it can be done. I remember election night, I had the neighbors in one house texting that they were mad about the presidential election, another house's residents were texting about being thrilled about the presidential candidates. They all asked my opinion on the judicial races--- we all wished each other happy holidays, and we all look out for each other when there is a strange car on the street.

I wish everyone else who complains about not knowing their neighbors would make more of an effort to find common ground--- we don't share the same religions, views on politics, and we all work different hours--- but have found a way to become a true community. I hope that all of you are able to find the same--- I love my neighborhood!
if i were trying to foster a sense of community i would stay away from politics.
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Old 01-13-2013, 04:19 AM
 
13,603 posts, read 11,641,996 times
Reputation: 17741
Sometimes it is also luck of the draw. Years ago I lived in an apartment complex where there were four units to a building. Everybody in our little unit got along very well. I am not particularly friendly, but I used to go to my next door neighbor's appt. to sit with his elderly mom and his pug while he ran errands. My ex-husband used to help the old folks upstairs out with small fix-it projects and the guy on the upper left was a single guy whose little daughter would come visit every other weekend. He was quiet and his daughter was a sweetheart.

Fast forward two years. The old people upstairs moved out and a bunch of noisy, obnoxious, party girls in their twenties moved in. The guy next door moved after his mom passed and a woman with several kids and a substance abuse problem moved in. Not sure what happened to the single dad. We bought a house that year and were glad to be out of there.

Good for you Girlesq, for trying to facilitate a sense of community. Perhaps you will have better luck with the transiency factor.
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Old 01-13-2013, 07:40 AM
 
Location: Salt Lake City/Las Vegas
1,596 posts, read 2,493,644 times
Reputation: 1895
I agree with the OP. A sense of community is what YOU make it. Be proactive. The worst that will happen is people won't respond.

The two best times to get to know neighbors are when we are moving in or when new people move in around us. When moving in, it's a great excuse to go around and introduce yourself to neighbors. And, when new people move in around you - same thing. It's an opportunity to break the ice.

If you don't do it for fostering good relationships, do it for more practical reasons. Are you going to need baby sitters, pet sitters, someone to watch your house or get mail while you're gone? That's what good neighbors do for each other. It pays off. You've got each other's backs.

Bill
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Old 01-13-2013, 08:20 AM
 
249 posts, read 369,549 times
Reputation: 235
Thankfully I don't foresee any of us going anywhere anytime soon--I doubt our houses will be sold for what we paid for them for a while, particularly since they are still selling them brand new from the builder.
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Old 01-13-2013, 09:09 AM
 
Location: Reno
920 posts, read 2,128,842 times
Reputation: 951
Quote:
Originally Posted by Girlesq View Post
I hear and read all of the time that people in Las Vegas do not know their neighbors and keep to themselves. It is absolutely possible to have a sense of community here-- with a little effort. I moved to my street about a year and a half ago-- it was a new street and everyone had lived here under a year (I was the last house on the street to be occupied-- six houses total on a culdesac. I personally know all of my neighbors even though we all work different hours, some have young kids, some have grown kids, some have no kids. I speak regularly with the residents of three of the houses, and semi-regularly with the residents of the other two houses. It's a very quiet neighborhood (although not in a gated community)--- I'm very happy that I live on this street--- it's all what you make of it-- if everyone put in more of an effort, it can be done. I remember election night, I had the neighbors in one house texting that they were mad about the presidential election, another house's residents were texting about being thrilled about the presidential candidates. They all asked my opinion on the judicial races--- we all wished each other happy holidays, and we all look out for each other when there is a strange car on the street.

I wish everyone else who complains about not knowing their neighbors would make more of an effort to find common ground--- we don't share the same religions, views on politics, and we all work different hours--- but have found a way to become a true community. I hope that all of you are able to find the same--- I love my neighborhood!
Excellent points, but as they say, it takes two to tango.

I'm in a development of mostly new homes. The vast majority of my neighbors are the "come home and immediately close the garage door" types, with no apparent interest in socializing with or even acknowledging others in the neighborhood. It's unfortunate; there are far more advantages to knowing your neighbors than not knowing them, but if you make the effort and they don't reciprocate, there isn't much you can do.

I know this isn't unique to my neighborhood, but I wish it were different, and I think my situation is more the rule than the exception. Girlesq, you have a good thing going where you are. Congratulations.
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Old 01-13-2013, 09:16 AM
 
2,180 posts, read 4,147,470 times
Reputation: 1077
Who complains about not knowing there neighbors?

some folks prefer it like that
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Old 01-13-2013, 09:20 AM
 
Location: Reno
920 posts, read 2,128,842 times
Reputation: 951
Quote:
Originally Posted by MSchu View Post
Who complains about not knowing there neighbors?

some folks prefer it like that
And some don't. My post wasn't a complaint but a statement that I wish it were different.
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