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Old 06-20-2021, 07:51 AM
 
Location: Dallas, TX and Las Vegas, NV
7,115 posts, read 6,078,206 times
Reputation: 16096

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Quote:
Originally Posted by midwestvet View Post
I am thinking of moving to a warmer climate, with a potential housing appreciation, but it is not too expensive right now like California. Florida and Texas are out because of humility. I also want to live in a city, so be able to access to good health care. I toured S.W, like Grand Canyon, Arches, Bryce Canyon, Zion National parks, and I like the desert climate. Not want to work real tough jobs, perhaps just to take a seasonal or temp job. That is why I am thinking of Las Vegas, and did some research.
Good choice. We went thru the same evaluation and are here and very happy with our decision!
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Old 06-20-2021, 08:50 AM
 
9,909 posts, read 3,391,049 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by midwestvet View Post
with due respect, climate warming is real, California or the whole west are facing real issues, they do lack of rain, and they have to make tough choices, I doubt the solutions are so simple like you suggested.
The data and academic research actually show - unequivocally - that:
  • Heat waves in the US are now no more common than they were in 1900.
  • The warmest temperatures in the US have not risen in the past fifty years.
  • Humans have had no detectable impact on hurricanes over the past century.
  • Greenland’s ice sheet isn’t shrinking any more rapidly today than it was eighty years ago.
  • The net economic impact of human-induced climate change will be minimal through at least the end of this century.
  • Tornado frequency and severity are not trending up.
  • The number and severity of droughts are not trending up.
  • The extent of global fires has been trending significantly downward.
  • The rate of sea-level rise has not accelerated.
  • Global crop yields are rising, not falling.
  • And while global atmospheric CO2 levels are clearly higher now than two centuries ago, they’re not at any record planetary high—they’re at a low that has only been seen once before in the past 500 million years.

The is documented by Dr. Steven Koonin - the Obama Administration Chief Climate Scientist.

Quote:
Dr. Steven E. Koonin is a leader in science policy in the United States. He served as Undersecretary for Science in the US Department of Energy under President Obama, where he was the lead author of the Department’s Strategic Plan and the inaugural Quadrennial Technology Review (2011). With more than 200 peer-reviewed papers in the fields of physics and astrophysics, scientific computation, energy technology and policy, and climate science, Dr. Koonin was a professor of theoretical physics at Caltech, also serving as Caltech’s Vice President and Provost for almost a decade. He is currently a University Professor at New York University, with appointments in the Stern School of Business, the Tandon School of Engineering, and the Department of Physics. Dr. Koonin’s memberships include US National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the JASON group of scientists who solve technical problems for the US government. Since 2014, he has been a trustee of the Institute for Defense Analyses and chaired the National Academies’ Divisional Committee for Engineering and Physical Sciences from 2014-2019. He is currently an independent governor of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and has served in similar roles for the Los Alamos, Sandia, Brookhaven, and Argonne National Laboratories.
The above show his impeccable science credentials - unlike, say, an angry Swedish teenager raised to Sainthood by members of Her Church.

"Unsettled: What Climate Science Tells Us, What It Doesn’t, and Why It Matters" https://www.amazon.com/Unsettled-Cli...798/ref=sr_1_1

At the same time, the water level in Lake Mead speaks for itself, as does the water level in upstream Lake Powell.
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Old 06-20-2021, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Central Indiana/Indy metro area
1,632 posts, read 2,642,810 times
Reputation: 1676
Quote:
Originally Posted by midwestvet View Post
Hi, I am thinking of retiring to las vegas in a couple years, however with the news that west in a mega drought and the Lake Mead water level is decreasing so fast, maybe drying up in the next couple decades, also make me hesitant. Is that still a good idea.
Quote:
Originally Posted by lvmensch View Post
Not a real problem in Las Vegas. Remember that Las Vegas is the major city that is behind Hoover Dam and will be able to pump water even if the level drops below the dam spill ways. The real impact of a lowering flow in the Colorado will be CA agriculture.

Las Vegas also has other resources including bringing back the Las Vegas pipeline to upstate. So it is unlikely that Vegas will have water problems.
I have no plans on relocating for about a decade, but Las Vegas is a place I wouldn't mind considering for a pre-retirement place to live. I'm over the freezing and somewhat snowy winters here in the lower Midwest. I also really like varied topography combined with day hiking, having a larger body of water nearby to rent a boat or kayak, etc.. Plus, being a days drive away from places like Yellowstone, southern Utah, etc. would be a bonus.

Reading all the news stories about the on-going water situation is worrisome, but who knows what it will be like in ten years. I do think that the desert areas of the SW really need more strict controls over water. I find it really odd that people in Las Vegas or other areas have actual laws with grass and that they even allow golf courses. Being a tourist destination, the golf courses I can at least understand, but it seems odd that some homes have actual grass. I can't stand yard work, but I deal with it in my area. Having a decent desert hardscape yard would be so much easier to deal with.

I predict more talk in the future about running pipelines from the east. I'm sure there will be a huge fight over there. Here in the outskirts of the Indy metro area and the rural areas just beyond that, people are fighting huge solar farms going up. Makes no sense to me. Destroy good farmland for solar energy when we have acres of Walmart, Home Depot, etc. parking lots that could be turned into solar farms with covered parking. Not to mention the roofs of all these massive warehouses (Amazon and others).
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Old 06-21-2021, 10:10 AM
 
1,306 posts, read 1,579,403 times
Reputation: 1528
Quote:
Originally Posted by lvmensch View Post
..Las Vegas also has other resources including bringing back the Las Vegas pipeline to upstate. So it is unlikely that Vegas will have water problems.
No that idea is dead in the water (no pun intended). Supreme court finally and rightfully killed that idea. It was a bad idea anyway... spend 15 BILLION to build a pipeline up there and drain the water from the Eastern Nevada watershed. Once that water is gone, that's it! 15 BILLION WASTED. That kind of money is better spent on desalination plants.
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Old 06-21-2021, 11:15 AM
 
Location: Lone Mountain Las Vegas NV
17,385 posts, read 7,556,617 times
Reputation: 8297
Quote:
Originally Posted by timothyaw View Post
No that idea is dead in the water (no pun intended). Supreme court finally and rightfully killed that idea. It was a bad idea anyway... spend 15 BILLION to build a pipeline up there and drain the water from the Eastern Nevada watershed. Once that water is gone, that's it! 15 BILLION WASTED. That kind of money is better spent on desalination plants.
Agreed as of now. But if a real problem I am sure it can be resurrected. And there is no need to drain those aquifers. Just draw as they can supply repeatedly. See NYC as an example.

And I agree that desalinization may be a better approach. However that involves other governments. So not entirely under Nevada control.

I would also note the final court decision was a District Court which SNWA choose not to appeal. SNWA agreed there was no need for the pipeline over the next 30 years. Then we see.
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Old 06-21-2021, 01:48 PM
 
Location: Lifelong Southern Californian (and happy!)
653 posts, read 306,010 times
Reputation: 2095
Quote:
Originally Posted by midwestvet View Post
I am thinking of moving to a warmer climate, with a potential housing appreciation, but it is not too expensive right now like California. Florida and Texas are out because of humility. I also want to live in a city, so be able to access to good health care. I toured S.W, like Grand Canyon, Arches, Bryce Canyon, Zion National parks, and I like the desert climate. Not want to work real tough jobs, perhaps just to take a seasonal or temp job. That is why I am thinking of Las Vegas, and did some research.
Texas sure could use a good dose of humility!
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Old 06-21-2021, 05:13 PM
 
Location: Southern Highlands
2,237 posts, read 1,450,018 times
Reputation: 1988
Quote:
Originally Posted by apple92680 View Post
Texas sure could use a good dose of humility!
One week in California should do it.
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Old 06-21-2021, 11:54 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
3,598 posts, read 2,480,802 times
Reputation: 1352
Quote:
Originally Posted by cold warrior View Post
one week in california should do it.
:d
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Old 06-26-2021, 11:48 PM
 
Location: Henderson, NV
7,038 posts, read 7,344,244 times
Reputation: 9797
I know it becomes a joke - “it’s a dry heat” - but it’s really amazing the difference that makes. I found Bali and Orlando (in August) to be virtually intolerable outside because of the oppressive humidity and neither of those visits did it ever hit above around 88 degrees. I’d far rather 110 and dry heat here than 85 and humid somewhere else. I don’t find our heat to be much of an issue unless you’re required to be out in it for long. Say, you’re a roofing contractor or your job requires you be outside constantly. Otherwise though, it’s pleasant for swimming, it’s not a huge deal walking to and from your car (compared to getting drenched by humidity in Orlando lol), etc.
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Old 06-27-2021, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Irvine, CA
334 posts, read 203,415 times
Reputation: 956
Quote:
Originally Posted by indy_317 View Post
Reading all the news stories about the on-going water situation is worrisome, but who knows what it will be like in ten years.
I used to worry about the water situation, but water isn't just a LV problem, it is also a Los Angeles problem, and an OC problem, and a San Diego problem, and a Riverside problem, and a Phoenix problem, and a Tucson problem. And Colorado, and Utah, and et al. The entire southwest has a water problem that's why I think with the collective economies of this entire region at stake the private sector will come up with solutions. There's just too much money on the line to let the entire region dry up and become unlivable. And I think people are finally waking up to this. We'll see, but when billions or even trillions of dollars are at stake sometimes money is the only thing that spurs people into action, sadly.

Last edited by luckydogg; 06-27-2021 at 11:56 AM..
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