U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Pennsylvania > Lehigh Valley
 [Register]
Lehigh Valley Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-06-2008, 06:32 AM
 
392 posts, read 1,272,414 times
Reputation: 83

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffvivian View Post
Toobusy...

Foreclosed homes are not always auctioned off. It depends on how the bank would like to proceed with the home...Foreclosure is a very complicated and sometimes long process....but here is a link of foreclosed homes in Lehigh County, Northampton County still does this the old fashion way where you have to go to the court house to pick up the list....
Lehigh County Website

Thanks
Jeff
Wow...thats a pretty big list. Its a shame....with all these foreclosed homes, Allentown will never recover and make the neighborhoods nice. Be interested to see pix of these house and see how many are in disrepair or missing appliances.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-06-2008, 06:59 AM
 
12,870 posts, read 29,506,883 times
Reputation: 7438
The homes that I know of in my area are in very nice neighborhoods with homes selling for around $400,000. These seem to be the ones that ER is talking about where people just couldn't afford what they thought they could - or what the bank told them they could.

I agree with Kristy that it's very sad to think of people going through a foreclosure, I am also uncomfortable with the I-told-you-so-attitude regarding this misfortune. Everyone makes mistakes, some are just more public then others.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-06-2008, 07:20 AM
 
Location: Lehigh Valley, PA
242 posts, read 771,879 times
Reputation: 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stavs View Post
Wow...thats a pretty big list. Its a shame....with all these foreclosed homes, Allentown will never recover and make the neighborhoods nice. Be interested to see pix of these house and see how many are in disrepair or missing appliances.

Stavs

you really have to check the list some of these are repeated every month as they move throught the foreclosure process.....but I would say about 50% of these are in disrepair.....and the biggest problem with foreclosures right now....is they (homeowner) strip the house of all the copper plumbing because copper is so valuable.

Amazing but true.
Jeff

Last edited by jeffvivian; 10-06-2008 at 07:32 AM.. Reason: added homeowner
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-06-2008, 08:21 AM
 
Location: Lehigh Valley, PA
242 posts, read 771,879 times
Reputation: 45
And for the lady in the article who is waiting for the bailout to help with foreclosures....I hope she isn't holding her breath becasue the bailout does nothing for the homeowner in foreclosure.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-06-2008, 08:30 AM
 
Location: Lehigh Valley, PA
242 posts, read 771,879 times
Reputation: 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by toobusytoday View Post
The homes that I know of in my area are in very nice neighborhoods with homes selling for around $400,000. These seem to be the ones that ER is talking about where people just couldn't afford what they thought they could - or what the bank told them they could.

I agree with Kristy that it's very sad to think of people going through a foreclosure, I am also uncomfortable with the I-told-you-so-attitude regarding this misfortune. Everyone makes mistakes, some are just more public then others.
It is a shame the amount of foreclosures that are happening....and the foreclosure process is a brutual one to go through....and most times if you make even a partial payment the bank will not pursue a foreclosure process.

So it is really a problem that no generalization can fix and certainly no general legislature.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-06-2008, 05:47 PM
 
191 posts, read 640,770 times
Reputation: 44
Default Ty

Quote:
Originally Posted by nocturnal rooster View Post
What is your problem? I think this is very relevant info
Remember the only people who don't want the truth being told are realtors and people who bought during the bubble. They commision based people are negative equitity homeowners.


www.patrick.net
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-06-2008, 05:52 PM
 
392 posts, read 1,272,414 times
Reputation: 83
25 more posts and you become a Senior Member
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-06-2008, 07:20 PM
 
191 posts, read 640,770 times
Reputation: 44
More facts from REAL ECONOMISTS, not realtors.


charles hugh smith-When Will Housing Really Bottom? (Part I)
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-06-2008, 07:57 PM
 
12,870 posts, read 29,506,883 times
Reputation: 7438
But ER, why do you blame the realtors? As I've said before the buyer knows the score when they buy. We knew what our neighbors paid and we knew how much our house was appraised for. Anyone that reads the paper knows what's going on with the housing market. We were the ones that searched the MLS listings and decided which houses to look at.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-06-2008, 10:05 PM
 
191 posts, read 640,770 times
Reputation: 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by toobusytoday View Post
But ER, why do you blame the realtors? As I've said before the buyer knows the score when they buy. We knew what our neighbors paid and we knew how much our house was appraised for. Anyone that reads the paper knows what's going on with the housing market. We were the ones that searched the MLS listings and decided which houses to look at.

They played a major role in deceptive lies too the American public. Here's some of the great spin we've seen over the past several years, all our flat out lies.

1. “There’s no question there is a strong demand for housing from a growing population.” - David Lereah, NAR Chief Economist
2. “For the foreseeable future, the demand for homes will continue to outstrip supply” - Al Mansell, NAR President
3. “We’ve been expecting sales to remain at historically high levels, but this performance underscores the value of housing as an investment and the importance of homeownership in fulfilling the American dream.” - David Lereah, NAR Chief Economist
4. “We are returning to more balanced markets between home buyers and sellers… We feel confident that housing is landing softly as rates continue to rise.” - David Lereah, NAR Chief Economist
5. “This is part of the market adjustment we’ve been discussing, with a soft landing in sight for the housing sector. The level of home sales activity is now at a sustainable level. Overall fundamentals remain solid…” - David Lereah, NAR Chief Economist
6. “Higher interest rates are slowing home sales, but we see this as another sign of a soft landing for the housing sector which remains at historically high levels.” - David Lereah, NAR Chief Economist
“After five years of booming sales, we are now experiencing normal market conditions across most of the country… most owners can expect steadier gains in home values for the foreseeable future.” - Thomas M. Stevens, NAR President
7. “Over the last three months home sales have held in a narrow range, easing to a level that is near our annual projection, which tells us the market is stabilizing” - David Lereah, NAR Chief Economist
8. “Now sellers in many areas of the country are pricing to reflect current market realities. As a result, there could be some lift to home sales, but it’ll likely take some months for price appreciation to rise.” - David Lereah, NAR Chief Economist
9. Existing-home sales stabilized at a sustainable pace in August - NAR
10. “…the worst is behind us as far as a market correction — this is likely the trough for sales. When consumers recognize that home sales are stabilizing, we’ll see the buyers who’ve been on the sidelines get back into the market” - David Lereah, NAR Chief Economist
11. “It looks like we’re moving beyond the low for the housing cycle last fall, and buyers are responding to historically low interest rates and competitive pricing by home sellers. In addition, a tightening inventory of homes on the market is supporting prices.” - David Lereah, NAR Chief Economist
12. “Fundamentals have improved in the housing market and buyers see a window now with historically-low mortgage interest rates and competitive pricing by sellers,” - David Lereah, NAR Chief Economist
13. “We also may be seeing some losses as a result of the subprime fallout. However, this is masking improved fundamentals in the housing market, with lower mortgage interest rates and motivated sellers.” - David Lereah, NAR Chief Economist
14. “Buyers who’ve been on the sidelines may want to take a closer look at current conditions in their area – if they wait for sales to rise, their choices and negotiating position won’t be as good as they are now.” - Pat V. Combs, NAR President
15. “The rise in sales and prices in the Northeast region on a fairly consistent basis in recent months is promising because this was the first region that underwent sales and price weakness after the boom. Now, it appears that it will be the first region to climb back, indicating that other regions could follow a similar path.” - Lawrence Yun, NAR Chief Economist
16. “The unusual disruptions in the mortgage market, including a significant rise in jumbo loan rates, resulted in a fairly high number of postponed or cancelled sales…Once we get through these disruptions, we’ll get a better sense of where the actual market is in late fall as conditions begin to normalize,” - Lawrence Yun, NAR Chief Economist
17. “Existing-Home Sales Rise in November, Market Likely Stabilizing” - NAR
18. “Home sales remain weak despite improved affordability conditions in many parts of the country, but we could get a quick boost to the market if loan limits are raised in combination with the bold cut in the Fed funds rate,” - Lawrence Yun, NAR Chief Economist
19. Existing-Home Sales to Stablize Before Upturn in Second Half of 2008 - NAR
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Pennsylvania > Lehigh Valley
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top