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Old 08-26-2010, 09:20 AM
 
Location: Tallahassee
70 posts, read 99,129 times
Reputation: 82

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Greetings,

I searched this topic before posting.

I just moved to the Southland area. My house, under 1500 sqft, has a central not exterior wall chimney, with a hearth in the basement and main floor. Currently, the heating system is forced air gas furnace that my home inspector found fault-ridden. I've lived in very modest accomodations and heated with woodstoves and propane heaters in the past--I'm familiar with chainsaws, axes, woodpiles, and all the time and energy they consume. I don't have a mortgage, so the only people who would object to my alternative heat source would by my home owner's insurance.

That said, my question is this: what do Lexington residents prefer for an alternative heat source? Wood stove? Coal stove? Alternative fuel stove/furnace? etc. Currently I don't own a pick-up truck, so hauling my own cut firewood isn't a good option. Any thoughts about availability of sources of fuel and the stoves/furnaces that burn them are welcome.

While I wait to decide, I'll be maxing out my home insulation factor, getting my chimney serviced, and researching locally and online.

Thanks for reading.
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Old 08-27-2010, 09:07 AM
 
1,253 posts, read 3,185,236 times
Reputation: 768
If it were me & I didnt have a mortgage & were planning to stay in the house for a long time, I'd go with in-floor radiant heat. Its basically coil tubing running directly underneath your floor that pumps heated water through the tubes from a source (like your regular hot water heater). KY winters are usually pretty mild, so you could probably just use it for heating & nothing else. Its "green" too & would save on your energy use/expenses.
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Old 09-09-2010, 05:31 PM
 
Location: Tallahassee
70 posts, read 99,129 times
Reputation: 82
Thanks KerryB.

Now I'm considering an outdoor wood furnace. I'll start a new thread asking for recommended contractors for this.
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Old 09-11-2010, 03:52 PM
 
658 posts, read 924,439 times
Reputation: 707
I'd try a corn stove but I was told they have to have a power source to run-so they are not good for the big ice storm scenario.

Radiant in floor heat powered by solar would be great-big big bucks and a total gut job on house to put one in.
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