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Old 07-28-2017, 09:59 PM
 
7 posts, read 5,731 times
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My wife and I are looking for a place to retire, trying to escape Texas' oppressive property taxes. We recently scouted Knoxville TN, but ruled it out due to traffic--neither of us likes to drive on freeways, and the alternative routes were narrow winding roads with drop-offs instead of shoulders. We currently live in a town with a population of 200,000 where we can get pretty much anywhere in 15 minutes if we avoid rush hour. What is the traffic like in Lexington?
Thanks.
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Old 07-29-2017, 06:49 AM
 
Location: My beloved Bluegrass
17,207 posts, read 12,451,662 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by olias40 View Post
My wife and I are looking for a place to retire, trying to escape Texas' oppressive property taxes. We recently scouted Knoxville TN, but ruled it out due to traffic--neither of us likes to drive on freeways, and the alternative routes were narrow winding roads with drop-offs instead of shoulders. We currently live in a town with a population of 200,000 where we can get pretty much anywhere in 15 minutes if we avoid rush hour. What is the traffic like in Lexington?
Thanks.
To a large degree, the same as the traffic you describe where you currently live, except......

There are some specific times of the year where traffic is just outright nutty in certain areas of the city.
- The beginning of the school year anywhere near U.K.:
Aside from the sudden huge population influx, it seems like there are lots of people who for the first time in their lives are driving in an area with more than 10,000 people. This all results in lots of people in parked places that block traffic, lost drivers, young inexperienced drivers, distracted drivers.
- Christmas or even weekend shopping in the Nicholasville Road area:
Crowded with impatient drivers moving at a snail's pace, who have forgotten the purpose of blinkers, and are bound and determined to make that turn three lanes over in 150 feet. Seriously, I live in the D.C. Metro area now, in what is considered one of the worst traffic areas in the nation, and I refuse the go shopping with my sister there whenever I visit because it is so frustrating. Somehow or the other, for such a populated place get get such a large influx of surrounding area shoppers, Lexington has managed to concentrate it's shopping areas like no other city its size I've seen. I suspect it has something to do with Lexington's willingness to use zoning laws to maintain it's charming small city look and zealous insistence that surrounding historic farm lands be preserved.
- The spokes of the wheel going from downtown outward during rush hours:
Not horrible, but definitely something you wish the avoid if you can. The two circling roads, New Circle Road (Circle 4) and Man-of-War are actually pretty smooth driving, compared to other places with similar setups that I have driven.
- Versailles Road during Keenland:
Just plan around it. This is one that is totally avoidable with a little planning, is easy to predict, and I tend to have little sympathy for anyone whining about it. There's no way to avoid it if you want to go to Keenland (which you should occasionally) so it just needs to be embraced as part of the experience.
- There is a weird traffic configuration on Harrodsburg Road:
It is only the second one of its type in the nation, but there is an area on Harrodsburg Road where the traffic flow switches sides of the road and you are kind of driving British style. Odd as it sounds, it is actually very safe and once you get over the pure shock of it you realize it works very well, especially if you had driven that stretch of the road before it was changed. It fixed what had previously been Lexington's biggest, most lethal, wreck area and one of its worst traffic delay areas.
I'm sure there are other areas that people could point out. All in all, Lexington isn't a place I would avoid based on traffic, but it does have it's moments. What it definitely has over a lot of places it's size is generally polite drivers. People will let you in (if you use that blinker that does appear to be broken on about 75% of the other cars on the road), drivers move to the other lane fairly eairly when there's a closed lane sign, and there isn't massive aggressive "I need to get one car length ahead of you at any cost" passing.
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When I post in bold red that is moderator action and, per the TOS, can only be discussed through Direct Message.Moderator - Asia and Kentucky (including Lexington & Louisville)
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Old 07-29-2017, 07:05 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
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I used to live in Lexington off of Richmond Road. I did not find the traffic at all bad. The above is true, and well stated, but it is not a place where traffic is usually a problem. It is a nice little city, and due to UK, and the horse industry, has some pretty good amenities. It is very livable.
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Old 07-29-2017, 08:23 PM
 
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Thank you for the responses. I am really glad to hear that drivers are generally courteous, I think it says a lot about their attitude towards others. One of the things that really put us off Knoxville was that on the freeway there always seemed to be a wall of cars in the right lane, and they wouldn't do anything (move over, speed up, slow down) to help people get on--they just stayed in the right lane seemingly oblivious to the cars on the ramp trying to enter the freeway.

One of the good things about traffic where we live in Texas is that our town is laid out with most of the streets running either North/South or East/West, and roughly every mile is a 4 lane road. Downtown is mostly 3 lanes going one way, with a corresponding one-way going the opposite way the next street over.
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Old 07-30-2017, 08:06 AM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
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Lexington is a good place to live if you hate freeways because no other city of it's size has fewer going through the urban core. The interstates skirt to the outside of town and the only other one is a 3/4ths freeway beltline. Lexington has rebuilt most old country roads consumed by the city to be wider and with sidewalks and streetlights. Only a couple are still narrow and unsafe. Afternoon rush hour can be a beast in a few spots but the rest of the time it's easy to get around. Lexington is compact for it's population so distances are shorter.
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Old 08-04-2017, 12:01 PM
 
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Average traffic for its size, but hub and spoke design obviously has pros/cons versus your western grid-style city. With the circle around the city, it's fairly painless to get from one side to the other, but it can be miserable going to/from city center at rush hour. Avoid UK area during afternoon, particularly South Limestone, and it's fine. We do have some alternate routes with drop-offs too (e.g., Parkers Mill) and plenty of roads outside the city have drop-offs PLUS large trees literally two feet from the road. You may never need to use them, but road safety is NOT a priority here... preserving the natural look of the landscape is... and I suppose even if they wanted to change things, it'd take them 15 years to do it (Newtown Pike Extension anyone?).
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Old 08-06-2017, 07:24 PM
 
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The implied complaint about tree-lined rural roads near Lexington is frustrating for me to read. Such historic roads are also often lined with drystone walls built in the early 1800s, and are lined with manicured thoroughbred horse farms.

They're part of what makes the Bluegrass the Bluegrass. Of course preserving not only the natural "look" but the actual nature of such things is important here. It's part of what makes this beautiful area unique.

If you want to ensure safety on such roads, slow down!
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Old 08-07-2017, 03:29 PM
 
Location: My beloved Bluegrass
17,207 posts, read 12,451,662 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
The implied complaint about tree-lined rural roads near Lexington is frustrating for me to read. Such historic roads are also often lined with drystone walls built in the early 1800s, and are lined with manicured thoroughbred horse farms.

They're part of what makes the Bluegrass the Bluegrass. Of course preserving not only the natural "look" but the actual nature of such things is important here. It's part of what makes this beautiful area unique.

If you want to ensure safety on such roads, slow down!
Of course it is part of what makes Lexington gorgeous, and those zoning laws and old country lanes do much to preserve Lexington's charm. Wouldn't want it any other way, myself. However, those lovely sights also create unique tragic issues for a city of Lexington's size.
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When I post in bold red that is moderator action and, per the TOS, can only be discussed through Direct Message.Moderator - Asia and Kentucky (including Lexington & Louisville)
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Old 08-15-2017, 01:07 PM
 
83 posts, read 193,972 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
The implied complaint about tree-lined rural roads near Lexington is frustrating for me to read. Such historic roads are also often lined with drystone walls built in the early 1800s, and are lined with manicured thoroughbred horse farms.

They're part of what makes the Bluegrass the Bluegrass. Of course preserving not only the natural "look" but the actual nature of such things is important here. It's part of what makes this beautiful area unique.

If you want to ensure safety on such roads, slow down!
There was no "implied complaint" in my post. I was merely stating the facts to answer the OP's question. He may or may not be interested in hearing about the merits of preserving the natural landscape. It's even possible he doesn't care one lick about "manicured thoroughbred horse farms" (gasp). I know I don't, but I do like the English look of our countryside with the green grass and the aforementioned stone walls, etc., and while I grew up on the outskirts and still enjoy taking the scenic routes on occasion, I'd be a fool to think those roads aren't more hazardous. Anyway, this might extraneous information to the OP anyway as he seemed to indicate he preferred it if he could stick to the main roads in Lexington, which shouldn't be a problem.
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