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Old 03-15-2008, 10:07 PM
 
1,316 posts, read 3,521,562 times
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What's Perryville like? Have you ever been there? Anything worth noting in that town besides CIlvil War fame? Does Perryville have a Krogers?
How far is it driving to Danville from there?

Does it have a historic area? WOuld you say it is upscale ie lots of second homes, retired boomers, golfers, leisure activity versus worker bees driving to and from work and schools....

What is the most upscale town in that area around Danville?

OR is it Danville?

How fast are houses selling there?

Is the market quiet there like most places these days?

ALso what's the terrain like? hilly. flat farmland, rolling hills horse country?

Weather? Does it get a lot of rain or any snow? Tornado country?

The area looks neat.
Thanks!

12b
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Old 08-18-2009, 08:30 AM
 
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Wow ... this question was posted two years ago & without any responses! But since my husband & I moved here two months ago, I thought I would go ahead & respond in case others will one day be searching for this information.

As far as Perryville goes, I would say don't move here. Moving here has been one of the biggest mistakes of our lives. We got a really nice house for a good price but the people, on our street anyway, are not friendly at all. Like I said, we've been here two months & not one of the neighbors has stopped by to welcome us to the neighborhood.

There is really nothing in Perryville except a Dollar Store, 2 banks, 2 furniture stores & 2 gas stations. You need to go to Danville for groceries or other shopping but that's okay with us because we wanted a small town but again the people just aren't friendly. To be fair, there might be some friendly people somewhere in the town but certainly not on our street.

The man we hired to do some repairs/remodeling on our house was very dishonest & did horrible work & didn't even finish some of it. We paid him $17,000 plus had to get our downstairs floors sanded, restained & polyed (an additional $3400) because he rebuilt our staircase & stained it with honey oak stain when the floors were stained with cherry. Little by little we will have to get someone in here to fix all the lousy work he has done.

Things seem to cost a bit more in this area than they do in other parts of the country where we've lived. We've also been told by a woman at the county courthouse that the taxes are going to be going up. One of the reasons we moved here was because of the lower taxes.

Houses don't seem to be selling very quickly. Our house had been on the market for a year when we bought it.

This is definitely NOT an upscale area. I guess you could say the terrain is rolling. Not totally flat but not what I'd call hilly. Our land (17 acres) is very rocky. There are places we've wanted to plant a tree or a bush or make a garden but we had to alter our plans because you dig into the soil a few inches & hit rock.

We haven't been here in the wintertime & this summer has been rather unusual with temps ranging in the 80s for the most part. We have heard from some people (when buying gas or getting something to eat) that it's usually very hot & very humid here in the summer. If you like thunderstorms then you will like it here. They have some pretty intense ones. Our home insurance guy also mentioned to us that this is an earthquake prone area.

Danville is about 10 miles away.

Guess that's it. My advice is to move anywhere else but here. In fact, avoid Kentucky altogether.

Last edited by sajehill; 08-18-2009 at 08:48 AM..
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Old 08-18-2009, 02:11 PM
 
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I'm guessing it wasn't answered because this is the Lexington forum.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sajehill View Post
avoid Kentucky altogether
Which state would honestly be better? Each place has it's own problems...
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Old 08-24-2009, 10:16 PM
 
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An old post, but the answers received omitted to note that Danville, a very short distance from Perryville, is a delightful mid-sized town filled with beautifully restored and maintained historic homes, with a fine college, major arts events (concerts, The Great American Band Festival), museums (notably the newish dollhouse museum), Constitution Square State Historic Park and the adjacent Ephraim McDowell House, plus an outstanding hometown bakery right across the street. There is also a vibrant Main Street, in addition to strip shopping on the outskirts of town. A good modern hospital is located here as well, and public schools are excellent.

Fifteen or twenty minutes gets you there from Perryville, which is a lovely little village of its own, rich in history, and the site of a major Civil War reenactment at the pristine, 800-acre Perryville Battle State Park each fall. Perryville was the largest battle fought in Kentucky, and the battlefield is includes a small museum (now being upgraded), and is considered to be very close to its 1860s appearance. Associated historic Merchants' Row in town is located on the banks of the picturesque Chaplin River.

Earthquakes?? Maybe a little tremblor once every four or five years, but there hasn't been a big one since New Madrid, and that's hundreds of miles away. Rocky land? Sure, we call it limestone, and that's why the soil is so rich and the thoroughbreds and cattle do so well here. Hilly? Yes, more so around Perryville than around Danville, but just a few miles down the road near old-timey Penn's Store at Junction Switch (really, we also have Junction City nearby) are wonderful geodes, in the Kentucky Knobs (smallish hills, laced by beautiful tree-lined creeks filled with geodes). Just up the road (US 68) are Harrodsburg and Shakertown at Pleasant Hill, and Lexington's an hour away if you feel the need for the Big City.

It's a shame the first responder had such an unfortunate encounter with a dishonest workman (call the Better Business Bureau and report him!) - and that his or her neighbors don't seem friendly. But please don't condemn the entire state because of these unfortunate experiences! Just look a little farther for congenial new acquaintances - yes, you may need to go to Danville, but opportunities abound there: garden groups, book discussions and other library programs and groups, church, school, civic, volunteer opportunities...ask and you'll find them. Read up on local history then go out to the battlefield in early October, look around you, ask questions...you'll meet people who'll be delighted to talk with you.

Of course, you may be long gone from Perryville - and Kentucky - by now...
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Old 08-24-2009, 10:33 PM
 
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Okay, I got a little defensive and failed to answer a few of the first poster's questions. The area immediately around Danville is gently rolling, with the much steeper, wooded Knobs rising just a few miles south of town. Danville is considerably larger and more "upscale" than is Perryville, which is a tidy, very quiet little town most of the time (the exception being the heavily attended and well-done Battle of Perryville commemorative weekend, usually the first weekend in October). Perryville and Danville are about a fifteen or twenty minutes' drive from one another (again, it takes much longer during the annual reenactment, when Perryville is jammed with spectators).

There are a typically several snows each winter, usually starting a little before Christmas and really getting underway after New Year's, but usually melting in a few days. The last sticking snow usually falls by March 15 and the last frost is usually over by mid-May or before. Flowers start to bloom in March and last through most of November. The first killing frost is usually in mid-October. Leaves reappear by late April. There are far more tornado watches than actual tornadoes, but expect a few warnings each spring and be prepared. The hills can offer some protection if you're in a valley, but don't count on it. Perryville is on the Chaplin River which is normally shallow and placid, but which of course can be also subject to droughts and/or floods at various times. Only part of Perryville is located in the flood plain, however.

Perryville is not usually thought of as a retirement or second home community, though it does draw visitors to the battlefield and other historic sites. There are good golf courses near Danville - I am not familiar with any near Perryville. I have no idea about the real estate market in either town, since I'm not househunting or selling, but the economy here, as in most of the country, has taken some hard hits, though Danville is a rather prosperous place, comparatively.

Hope this helps...
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Old 08-27-2009, 05:10 PM
 
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CraigCreek ... You must work for either the Chamber of Commerce or the Visitor's Bureau : ) I have moved a lot in my lifetime & I have seen "lovely little villages." I'm sorry to have to say this ... & I am not being critical because of my experience here with the contractor or because of the way the neighbors have totally ignored a newcomer moving in ... but the town of Perryville is really quite run down & nowhere near what anyone could possibly call a "lovely little village." I will admit it has some quaint street lights on the main highway through town but that's about as lovely as it gets. The "picturesque" Chaplin River is perhaps 20-25 feet wide & is so full of green muck it is disgusting. "Historic Merchant's Row" comprises 2-3 blocks of Main Street. It is a bunch of run-down old buildings, most of them empty. I do believe one or two of them have been refurbished but it is definitely not a row of quaint shops to visit as one would expect. I will admit that if the city would put some money, which I know is very hard to come by now-a-days, into restoring these old buildings & fixing up the town a bit ... maybe cleaning up the river as well ... this could be a nice little town but unfortunately I do not see that happening anytime soon, if at all, even though there is a preservation group here that is supposedly trying to do just that.

I will post some photos of the town when I get a chance.

The main thing to remember whether you want to move here or anywhere else is to come spend a few days to see what the place is like for yourself. My husband & I did visit here before we purchased our house but we were not interested in the town itself ... we were interested in finding a nice home in a nice neighborhood. We got the nice home ... it was unfortunate we did not try to make contact with the neighbors to see what they were like as well.

I did not make any reference to Danville because I don't live there & only visit for shopping. I can say, however, that there is a beautiful college there (Centre College) & the town has a lot of history but I would not say the main street is "vibrant." There are several stores but nothing spectacular although the bakery CraigCreek referred to is definitely outstanding.
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Old 08-27-2009, 06:01 PM
 
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I don't live in either town, so no doubt your experience is different. Nor do I work for the C of C., but I do love central Kentucky and its rich heritage.

However... often people find what they look for, and if they don't like what they find, then perhaps it might be wise to look elsewhere or make the best of it. I see a little town with a rich history and a lot of potential, located in a beautiful area with many attractions nearby, while you see a run-down, stagnating town with little to offer.

You know, Williamsburg, Virginia used to be a sleepy little town, too. Now, I doubt that any Rockefellers are likely to take an interest in Perryville, but I think there are lessons to be learned for those willing to study and apply what they learn.

You mentioned a historic preservation group in Perryville - would you be interested in joining it to help make things better? If you've been through a reenactment weekend, you know how much tourism potential is there for Perryville. You can't stir 'em with a spoon then - visitors are everywhere (and so are traffic jams, alas). If there's all this interest, then why not use it to help create more "vibrance" year-round, or at least more often than one or two weekends each year?

Just an idea. Glad we agree about Burke's Bakery!
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Old 08-27-2009, 06:55 PM
 
218 posts, read 564,823 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sajehill View Post
I will admit that if the city would put some money, which I know is very hard to come by now-a-days, into restoring these old buildings & fixing up the town a bit ... maybe cleaning up the river as well ... this could be a nice little town
Cities do not pay for refurbishing private property, property owners do. Owners do it for a return on investment and that return is not in Perryville. "Historic Midway" or Shakertown would not be as they are without an influx of private money a few years ago. That and they need to be a short distance from a good road.
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Old 02-09-2016, 09:33 PM
 
Location: Indianapolis IN
31 posts, read 30,809 times
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To sajehill,
It occurred to me that, given the fact that your posts are heavily laced with bitter complaints, perhaps you come off as very judgmental and unfriendly to the people in Perrysville. Maybe you could exchange your "brown-tinted glasses" for the rosy variety.

Last edited by Dakshina; 02-09-2016 at 09:43 PM..
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Old 02-10-2016, 09:58 AM
 
10,928 posts, read 8,991,667 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dakshina View Post
To sajehill,
It occurred to me that, given the fact that your posts are heavily laced with bitter complaints, perhaps you come off as very judgmental and unfriendly to the people in Perrysville. Maybe you could exchange your "brown-tinted glasses" for the rosy variety.
This thread is about six years old, but you are right. Hope the critical poster has a less jaundiced view nowadays.
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