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Old 11-25-2015, 02:41 PM
 
51 posts, read 63,939 times
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Knoxville has whole foods and trader joe's now. lol
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Old 12-11-2015, 12:59 AM
 
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I am considering moving to lexington or Louisville but not sure yet, I do not care for Knox, mostly redneck, not conservative enough for me. My fav place is N. Virginia but its too expensive but quality of life isway better.

Having lived in Calif, Florida, NJ, and Va Knox was my worst experience, a lady i know said this was the first place where she didn't make any friends, i would have to agree with that, people at work stick to themselves and are not very friendly for the most part, of course some are friendly. The pace is very slow thus making it seem like a depressing place to live.

I would hope Louisville is better than this, being north of here perhaps it is. Any comments on this?
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Old 12-11-2015, 03:52 PM
 
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Lexington's ambiance is neither redneck nor particularly conservative. While many political and religious conservatives live in Lexington, it is a tolerant, live-and-let-live sort of place. It's also one of the few places in Kentucky which went blue in the recent November election. Louisville is similar, though less traditionally Southern (except for Derby Week) in its ways.
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Old 12-11-2015, 04:35 PM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
11,022 posts, read 22,470,346 times
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Lexington has more of a progressive vibe than Knoxville and feels more like a college town. But if you think Knoxville is too slow of a pace of life then I think you'd like East Louisville best (St Matthews sounds like a good fit). Cincinnati would be worth a look too.
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Old 11-26-2016, 02:00 PM
 
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I have lived in both Knoxville, TN and Lexington, KY, though I was in Knoxville longer. I grew up primarily in the North, though I moved around some.

I would say Knoxville is overall friendlier, but more old-fashioned and traditional. People are very marriage/sex/having kids oriented, at least almost all of the ones I met. (I attended grad school there, went to church regularly, and worked there for a while after finishing my degree.)
They tend to be more inviting, but they also expect you to conform more. For a northern girl, it was a bit of a shock to encounter so many "girly girl" females. Many of them dress in tight clothes that leave little to the imagination.

Lexington seems to be less friendly, but more modern and less traditional. It does not feel southern to me. People just kind of let you do your own thing. Since I expected it to be a bit more like the bible belt south, one of my big surprises here was that I encountered so many people here who have sex outside of marriage and who consider it to be the norm. Some live that way for years - in some cases even while going to church and calling themselves Christians.
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Old 11-26-2016, 05:02 PM
 
Location: Ohio
690 posts, read 491,061 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corinna100 View Post
I have lived in both Knoxville, TN and Lexington, KY, though I was in Knoxville longer. I grew up primarily in the North, though I moved around some.

I would say Knoxville is overall friendlier, but more old-fashioned and traditional. People are very marriage/sex/having kids oriented, at least almost all of the ones I met. (I attended grad school there, went to church regularly, and worked there for a while after finishing my degree.)
They tend to be more inviting, but they also expect you to conform more. For a northern girl, it was a bit of a shock to encounter so many "girly girl" females. Many of them dress in tight clothes that leave little to the imagination.

Lexington seems to be less friendly, but more modern and less traditional. It does not feel southern to me. People just kind of let you do your own thing. Since I expected it to be a bit more like the bible belt south, one of my big surprises here was that I encountered so many people here who have sex outside of marriage and who consider it to be the norm. Some live that way for years - in some cases even while going to church and calling themselves Christians.
Sounds as if maybe, some of your experiences were due to who you were around. Lexington is an open city, but it still is very traditional and well within the Bible Belt...I wouldnt want other readers to think that Lexington was vastly different from Knoxville because they are more similar than not.
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Old 04-30-2017, 05:38 AM
 
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There is one major difference between Knoxville and Lexington that has not been mentioned: state income taxes. TN has no state income taxes, KY has state income taxes. (Why do you think Taylor Swift, et al use TN as a home base?) Of course, TN sales tax is ridiculous. Last I was aware, it was 10%. KY sales tax is 6.5%.

I mention this because it makes a difference to the bottom line for many. I have family members that live in FL and in TX simply due to no state income taxes.

All of that said, Lexington is a more white collar town and Knoxville is more blue collar. Nothing wrong with either, it is just your preference as to which you prefer.

KY schools (rural areas specifically, urban private schools are decent.) are notoriously low acheiving, sadly. (Not bashing, unfortunately, statistics prove this...) Much of this is due to nepotism at the local school systems. Good paying jobs are scarce in Kentucky. So, is hiring for schools is mostly based on "who you know" and not based on who is most qualified.

Kentucky is a beautiful state, but like all others, has it's issues. Tennessee is also quite beautiful. People are quite clannish outside of the urban areas in Kentucky. Tennessee seems to have some issues with clannish behavior. But, i don't hear of it on the same level as Kentucky. Real estate taxes are low in Kentucky. I have not lived in Tennesee but have visited often. So, I am unfamiliar with TN' s real estate taxes.

So, know what is important to you and see which area seems to fit better.

Last edited by Lena_Margaret; 04-30-2017 at 06:59 AM..
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Old 06-04-2017, 09:44 AM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
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Tennessee is ranked 9th best state for jobs while Kentucky was 48th.

https://wallethub.com/edu/best-states-for-jobs/35641/
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Old 06-04-2017, 11:52 AM
 
Location: Near L.A.
4,114 posts, read 9,735,006 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shakeesha View Post
Tennessee is ranked 9th best state for jobs while Kentucky was 48th.

https://wallethub.com/edu/best-states-for-jobs/35641/
Tennessee has a better economic infrastructure, overall less clannish people (maybe more extroverted but not necessarily genuinely friendlier, per se), and "smarter" marketing than Kentucky. Nashville is infinitely superior to Louisville as a city. Chattanooga is nicer than northern Kentucky. Vanderbilt is truly a world-class academic and research-oriented institution, and even UT-Knoxville is a better public university than UK or UofL.

Simply put, I love coming back to beautiful Kentucky for visits, but, let's face it, Tennessee is a much better state than Kentucky by many "on-paper" metrics.

Kentucky also seems content to be a "status quo" state; its state motto should be, "If It Ain't Broke, Don't Fix It." Now, I see some positive changes occurring on the economic development front with Matt Bevin as governor, and I would have voted for him if I had been living there during his run for governor, but Kentucky is just beginning to play catchup with Tennessee, North Carolina, and even Indiana. Furthermore, eastern Kentucky is an economic and cultural albatross for Kentucky, and even, arguably, the South, and I'm frankly not sure how and if they'll ever recover.

Disclaimer: I was born and raised in Kentucky, attended college in Louisville (my least favorite place I've lived anywhere in not only the U.S., but the world), and lived in northern Kentucky for a while.

Last edited by EclecticEars; 06-04-2017 at 12:01 PM..
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Old 06-05-2017, 03:14 AM
 
Location: My beloved Bluegrass
17,195 posts, read 12,438,807 times
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These types of threads, unless they are strictly about someone's move, are off topic in area forums. Competitive comparisons, which is what this thread morphed into, belong in the US General forum or City v City. This forum is about Kentucky itself.

Thread closed.
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