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Old 12-14-2011, 01:11 PM
 
Location: Village of Patchogue, NY
1,144 posts, read 2,886,644 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twingles View Post
Contracts are not normal practice in NY, unless you're a teacher or something like that. They can pull your offer at any time, but it's not likely they will. NY is an employment at will state. Either side can take or leave a job at any time.

IMHO giving 4 weeks notice is not a good idea. There's no reason for it, and once you give your notice your employer can ask you to leave the premises immediately (see "employment at will" above). And even if you do stay, both sides will tire of each other - the things you don't like will start to glare and you'll be tempted to slack off. Your employer knows this and will pile on the work to keep you busy. I've never known anyone who gave more than 2 weeks notice who ended up happy they did.
I understand somewhat that you are allowed to do what you please, but isn't it kind of unprofessional? 2 weeks seems to be par for the work force, but I'd negotiate with my superior for whatever they feel is adequate and what you're comfortable with to hire, train, and replace someone for my position. Though it might feel great at the time to give the old job a middle finger because you're moving on to bigger and better things could come back to bite you.
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Old 12-14-2011, 01:23 PM
 
247 posts, read 487,326 times
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Well, they said that I could give two week's notice if I had a letter from the new employer saying they needed me to start within two weeks, and my new employer WAS willing to do that, but the old company indicated that it was "at their discretion" if they wanted to accept that letter. I don't want to lose out on three week's pay.
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Old 12-14-2011, 01:23 PM
 
Location: under the beautiful Carolina blue
22,181 posts, read 34,102,943 times
Reputation: 18829
Quote:
Originally Posted by kayo_michael View Post
I understand somewhat that you are allowed to do what you please, but isn't it kind of unprofessional? 2 weeks seems to be par for the work force, but I'd negotiate with my superior for whatever they feel is adequate and what you're comfortable with to hire, train, and replace someone for my position. Though it might feel great at the time to give the old job a middle finger because you're moving on to bigger and better things could come back to bite you.
I agree - I would never NOT give 2 weeks notice if it can be helped. But 2 weeks isn't really that much time to advertise, interview, hire and train a new person. So as an employee leaving a job, I wouldn't really sweat that part of it. And it's not always feasible anyway, because the job you are going to doesn't always give you that much lead time. Outside a contract, there is no LEGAL requirement to give ANY notice. My first job out of college, when I left I was unable to give 2 weeks (it ended up as 1 business week 4 days) and mu supervisor told me "I can MAKE you stay the whole 2 weeks"....ummm, no you can't. Nobody at that company knew what the hell they were doing which is one of the reasons I left in the first place!
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Old 12-14-2011, 01:29 PM
 
247 posts, read 487,326 times
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Well, my new job has already agreed that four weeks was fine, and signed me up for the Jan 17 training. But had I gone the route of giving two weeks notice, I would have lost my vacation pay.
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Old 12-15-2011, 06:46 AM
 
Location: Islip,NY
20,289 posts, read 26,187,113 times
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In my old job (insurance office) we have had employees give 2 weeks notice and at the end of the the day were told to go and collect their things and leave right then and there. I asked someone about it and they told me that the compay was afraid that the if given the 2 weeks the brokers would use that time to lure clients away and take business . But in reality you could do that even if you weren't planning to leave, then when you left you would have a list of clients to steal right?
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Old 12-15-2011, 08:47 AM
 
1,144 posts, read 2,563,189 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lubby View Post
In my old job (insurance office) we have had employees give 2 weeks notice and at the end of the the day were told to go and collect their things and leave right then and there. I asked someone about it and they told me that the compay was afraid that the if given the 2 weeks the brokers would use that time to lure clients away and take business . But in reality you could do that even if you weren't planning to leave, then when you left you would have a list of clients to steal right?
Same in banking, no notice. In fact, if they let you go, it's also immideate. My friend was laid off a few years back. She was called into the office and informed of the layoff, told to pack up, and paid out the two weeks salary.
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Old 12-15-2011, 10:47 AM
 
Location: under the beautiful Carolina blue
22,181 posts, read 34,102,943 times
Reputation: 18829
Anyone with half a brain who deals with clients who knows they are going to be leaving is going to have their client list already at home before they give their notice. It's always amusing when people are surprised to be escorted out.

After I left my insurance job they started this practice. I guess they figured having access to checks and drafts for 2 weeks wasn't such a great idea.
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Old 12-15-2011, 08:54 PM
 
12,713 posts, read 17,194,584 times
Reputation: 8681
OP, i never signed a contract for my job...and I started there in March. At first it also made me question the legitimacy but "employment-at-will" is a pretty common practice. I am an at-will employee, but like you, I got a letter welcoming me to the team. I wouldn't sweat the no-contract thing. A lot of jobs don't have formal contracts.
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Old 12-16-2011, 09:32 AM
 
247 posts, read 487,326 times
Reputation: 143
Thanks, guys, for your help!
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