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Old 03-15-2019, 01:59 PM
 
Location: Evanston & Lake Forest, Illinois
1,837 posts, read 1,056,437 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sean1the1 View Post
I agree converting that golf course into a park would be a fantastic idea. It's not going to happen though. Technically LA City has tons of parkland Topanga state park in the Santa Monica Mountains is one of the largest urban parks in the country.
Do you know how important LACC is?
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Old 03-15-2019, 03:15 PM
 
Location: SoCal
3,877 posts, read 2,810,377 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hiruko View Post
Do you know how important LACC is?
Nope, I still would rather see a park.
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Old 03-15-2019, 03:45 PM
 
4,796 posts, read 3,511,761 times
Reputation: 7301
LACC is one of the most exclusive clubs in the world. The initiation fee for new members is over $100k and monthly dues are around $10k I believe. It's also extremely secretive about members. They don't allow photos to be posted on social media or anywhere else. That should give an idea of the type of people who are members and they are the same people making decisions about what happens in LA, CA , the USA and the world. If they don't want to turn their country club into a public park it's not going to happen
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Old 03-15-2019, 06:43 PM
 
Location: SoCal
3,877 posts, read 2,810,377 times
Reputation: 3183
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryanms3030 View Post
LACC is one of the most exclusive clubs in the world. The initiation fee for new members is over $100k and monthly dues are around $10k I believe. It's also extremely secretive about members. They don't allow photos to be posted on social media or anywhere else. That should give an idea of the type of people who are members and they are the same people making decisions about what happens in LA, CA , the USA and the world. If they don't want to turn their country club into a public park it's not going to happen
In my post I said that it would never happen. A CC means nothing to me, and the majority of people. A park however is for everyone!
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Old 03-15-2019, 09:32 PM
 
Location: Evanston & Lake Forest, Illinois
1,837 posts, read 1,056,437 times
Reputation: 2209
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryanms3030 View Post
LACC is one of the most exclusive clubs in the world. The initiation fee for new members is over $100k and monthly dues are around $10k I believe. It's also extremely secretive about members. They don't allow photos to be posted on social media or anywhere else. That should give an idea of the type of people who are members and they are the same people making decisions about what happens in LA, CA , the USA and the world. If they don't want to turn their country club into a public park it's not going to happen
I have a close relative who is a member and the above is pretty accurate. While it is on the Westside, it's very anti-Westside and the antithesis of the film and entertainment industry. It is exceptionally conservative—a relic of old California. LACC members are the quiet corporate executives, top-level corporate attorneys, physicians and surgeons, and certain politicians back in the day. Many more of the members live in the Verdugos and San Gabriel Valley than on the Westside. Nothing is happening to LACC. Keep dreaming. You'll have better luck conquering Hillcrest and pretty much everything else before LACC.
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Old 03-16-2019, 02:38 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles
3,452 posts, read 1,917,005 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kettlepot View Post
The golf course/country club could be purchased through eminent domain. The City/County would have to pay full market value for it, which undoubtedly would be a lot. It's an option if park land is that desperately needed.

However, if the purpose is to sell it on to a private developer, I believe the state constitution was amended to prohibit that. The public purpose prompting eminent domain has to be a bona fide public purpose.

In San Diego, at least one country club in Mission Valley has been purchased, gone through permitting, and will soon be turned into housing.
In 2005, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Kelo v. City of New London that the power of eminent domain can sometimes be used to transfer property from one private owner to another.

In response, many states passed laws to prohibit taking from one private owner to another private owner. California passed Prop. 99 in 2008.

Proposition 99 more narrowly prohibited "state and local governments from using eminent domain to acquire an owner-occupied residence [if the owner has occupied the residence for at least one year], as defined, for conveyance to a private person or business entity."

Prop. 99 does not prohibit the use of eminent domain for properties other than residences occupied by the owner for over a year. The nonpartisan California Legislative Analyst's Office (which prepares analyses for the official state voter guide) concluded, "Proposition 99 would not significantly change current government land acquisition practices."
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Old 03-16-2019, 02:53 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles
3,452 posts, read 1,917,005 times
Reputation: 4083
Quote:
Originally Posted by sean1the1 View Post
I agree converting that golf course into a park would be a fantastic idea. It's not going to happen though. Technically LA City has tons of parkland Topanga state park in the Santa Monica Mountains is one of the largest urban parks in the country.
Those are great parks but they are more remote and not in the urban footprint. On a per capita basis Los Angeles is underserved in park space compared to other large/dense metro areas.

https://www.kcet.org/shows/city-risi...-of-100-cities

Agreed with you and the OP that converting private golf course land into public park space would be of great public benefit but prohibitively expensive.
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Old 03-16-2019, 03:04 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles
3,452 posts, read 1,917,005 times
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Led by the Olmsted brothers, the sons of Frederick Law Olmsted who designed New York's Central Park as well as Boston's Emerald Necklace, their 1930 plan for Los Angeles was a sweeping vision for a dramatic urban/regional park system.

Olmsted and Bartholomew’s 178-page plan would have created almost 200,000 acres of small and large parks connected by numerous park-lined roadways including large swaths of open space along the coast. The plan was derailed by LA’s Chamber of Commerce, the same body that commissioned the plan in the first place.

https://archpaper.com/2014/08/could-...n-los-angeles/

Some are trying to revive a newer version of the plan and the greening of the LA River is one aspect of this.
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Old 03-16-2019, 06:48 AM
 
Location: SoCal
3,877 posts, read 2,810,377 times
Reputation: 3183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Astral_Weeks View Post
Those are great parks but they are more remote and not in the urban footprint. On a per capita basis Los Angeles is underserved in park space compared to other large/dense metro areas.

https://www.kcet.org/shows/city-risi...-of-100-cities

Agreed with you and the OP that converting private golf course land into public park space would be of great public benefit but prohibitively expensive.
I think this has to do with LA's urban area being the most dense in the country. In most cities when you leave the city density drops dramatically. In LA that's not the case many of the suburbs Santa Ana for instance are more dense than the city.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Astral_Weeks View Post
Led by the Olmsted brothers, the sons of Frederick Law Olmsted who designed New York's Central Park as well as Boston's Emerald Necklace, their 1930 plan for Los Angeles was a sweeping vision for a dramatic urban/regional park system.

Olmsted and Bartholomew’s 178-page plan would have created almost 200,000 acres of small and large parks connected by numerous park-lined roadways including large swaths of open space along the coast. The plan was derailed by LA’s Chamber of Commerce, the same body that commissioned the plan in the first place.

https://archpaper.com/2014/08/could-...n-los-angeles/

Some are trying to revive a newer version of the plan and the greening of the LA River is one aspect of this.
I was just thinking about this the other day there should be one massive urban park greenspace all along the LA river from the valley to long Beach. That would be absolutely awesome. The brothers also were responsible for the designing of Palos Verdes.
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Old 04-04-2019, 12:49 AM
 
Location: Tijuana Exurbs
4,114 posts, read 10,713,903 times
Reputation: 5000
Quote:
Originally Posted by Astral_Weeks View Post
In 2005, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Kelo v. City of New London that the power of eminent domain can sometimes be used to transfer property from one private owner to another.

In response, many states passed laws to prohibit taking from one private owner to another private owner. California passed Prop. 99 in 2008.

Proposition 99 more narrowly prohibited "state and local governments from using eminent domain to acquire an owner-occupied residence [if the owner has occupied the residence for at least one year], as defined, for conveyance to a private person or business entity."

Prop. 99 does not prohibit the use of eminent domain for properties other than residences occupied by the owner for over a year. The nonpartisan California Legislative Analyst's Office (which prepares analyses for the official state voter guide) concluded, "Proposition 99 would not significantly change current government land acquisition practices."
Thanks Astral.

It looks like I was generally correct in remembering that the state constitution was restricted on the point of eminent domain, but the amendment was less restrictive than I recalled in that it only protected private residences.
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