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Old 12-05-2012, 02:50 AM
 
7,563 posts, read 3,719,649 times
Reputation: 4177

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Quote:
Originally Posted by trancedout View Post
NY in general has too many old looking buildings with ladders on the side. Like a boring old style.

LA has a lot of South Beach style art deco which looks nicer.
Old architecture is amazing.
Alot more detail on it too.
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Old 12-05-2012, 07:33 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles (Native)
25,306 posts, read 16,445,196 times
Reputation: 12186
True there are still many buildings with retail stores selling crap...but it's not just homeless there's a lot of families shopping in those stores . If the stores are opened and doing business I don't think it's right to shut them down. But I do think there should be more done for the empty places . You are right that the retail is lacking in downtown . It seems to be mostly restauraunts which are opening ..which I personally think is cool..but it needs to be a mix.

If they do push out the homeless and the fear factor goes away ...dtla values will rise amazingly
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Old 12-05-2012, 08:28 AM
 
3,552 posts, read 5,707,857 times
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I'm sure many New Yorkers are amused at how LA always tries to compare itself to New York but I don't really see them taking too much time out of their day to think about it
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Old 12-05-2012, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,535,786 times
Reputation: 3999
Quote:
Originally Posted by GatsbyGatz View Post
LA doesn't NEED skyscrapers. This may be a controversial statement, but DTLA needs to gentrify. LA needs to fill in all the empty parking spaces, empty retail locations, empty buildings, and replace all the low-end stores. I'm sorry, but most of the stores in DTLA are low-quality, cheap goods. The vast majority of these stores are lost on the middle class and upper class which is unfortunately where cities gather money. For a world class city, this is rather disappointing. Downtown San Diego looks leaps and bounds richer and more luxurious than DTLA. Even Pasadena, a "small" city compared to LA, is more vibrant. In Downtown Pasadena, you can see all classes mingle together. You can see a variety of life. In DTLA, it's mostly homeless.

I'm merely pointing out the white elephant in the room, speaking what a lot of people won't admit because it's not "politically correct." DTLA isn't super vibrant simply because it lacks middle class / upper class "hipness". DTLA definitely has potential, but it's going to have to kick out the poor. That's the unfortunate fact.
It does need to keep gentrifying - not sure what you are talking about when you say its not vibrant. Sounds like its not "yuppified" enough for you - I hope DTLA never turns into what you would want it to be, aka Gaslamp District North with a little bit of Times Square thrown in. Yuck.
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Old 12-05-2012, 10:23 AM
 
5,845 posts, read 11,130,789 times
Reputation: 4499
Quote:
Originally Posted by GatsbyGatz View Post
LA doesn't NEED skyscrapers. This may be a controversial statement, but DTLA needs to gentrify. LA needs to fill in all the empty parking spaces, empty retail locations, empty buildings, and replace all the low-end stores. I'm sorry, but most of the stores in DTLA are low-quality, cheap goods. The vast majority of these stores are lost on the middle class and upper class which is unfortunately where cities gather money. For a world class city, this is rather disappointing. Downtown San Diego looks leaps and bounds richer and more luxurious than DTLA. Even Pasadena, a "small" city compared to LA, is more vibrant. In Downtown Pasadena, you can see all classes mingle together. You can see a variety of life. In DTLA, it's mostly homeless.

I'm merely pointing out the white elephant in the room, speaking what a lot of people won't admit because it's not "politically correct." DTLA isn't super vibrant simply because it lacks middle class / upper class "hipness". DTLA definitely has potential, but it's going to have to kick out the poor. That's the unfortunate fact.
Interesting. You make a lot of good points, but what I would like to point out is that although, yes it would be great to see DTLA gentrify, but the amazing thing about "LA"/greater LA/LA County is that you DO Have all these other small cities like Pasadena, etc. which other METROS don't have.

San Diego may have a much cleaner, more well off, and vibrant looking downtown than LA, but San Diego has the east suburbs of Santee and Lakeside 15 miles away, which I am learning is as close to being in Alabama as one can get in Southern California.
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Old 12-05-2012, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,535,786 times
Reputation: 3999
Quote:
Originally Posted by yamota View Post
I'm sure many New Yorkers are amused at how LA always tries to compare itself to New York but I don't really see them taking too much time out of their day to think about it
Have you ever read the New York Times or the New Yorker? New Yorkers are obsessed with Los Angeles, yet manage to get every article the write about LA laughably wrong.

I.E.:
Battle Over Crenshaw Line Gets National Nod from New York Times | Streetsblog Los Angeles
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/29/us...eles.html?_r=0

You wanna read some terrible, poorly-researched journalism that takes information completely out of context? The article above is a perfect sample of that, and sadly pretty typical of the NYT (terrible paper).
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Old 12-05-2012, 10:33 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles (Native)
25,306 posts, read 16,445,196 times
Reputation: 12186
Yeah that's true you can't look at downtown and say "L.A sucks..Manhattan is better" ...Also rents are probably 2 or 3 times less than Manhattan right now. As gentrification gets stronger I'm sure rents will go up a LOT ..they always do.

Downtown L.A is just a SMALL part of L.A city and the County of L.A

I know people complain that we don't have a "central downtown" where everyone goes to hangout...but I don't know if that's too appealing.. It's nice having different areas and the diversity in architecture, demographics, etc that that brings.

I think it would be pretty boring if everything was in downtown L.A and the rest of the city was just housing and chain restaurants mostly.
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Old 12-05-2012, 10:51 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,535,786 times
Reputation: 3999
Quote:
Originally Posted by jm1982 View Post
Yeah that's true you can't look at downtown and say "L.A sucks..Manhattan is better" ...Also rents are probably 2 or 3 times less than Manhattan right now. As gentrification gets stronger I'm sure rents will go up a LOT ..they always do.

Downtown L.A is just a SMALL part of L.A city and the County of L.A

I know people complain that we don't have a "central downtown" where everyone goes to hangout...but I don't know if that's too appealing.. It's nice having different areas and the diversity in architecture, demographics, etc that that brings.

I think it would be pretty boring if everything was in downtown L.A and the rest of the city was just housing and chain restaurants mostly.
Rents in Downtown are already through the roof - Downtown Housing Prices Got Way Too Crazy During the Boom - GentrificationWatch - Curbed LA
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Old 12-05-2012, 10:58 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles (Native)
25,306 posts, read 16,445,196 times
Reputation: 12186
They might be high..but nowhere near Manhattan levels. For example this one:
Bartlett Lofts

That's too high for rent in my opinion ..but someone from Manhattan might view it as 'cheap'
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Old 12-05-2012, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,535,786 times
Reputation: 3999
Quote:
Originally Posted by jm1982 View Post
They might be high..but nowhere near Manhattan levels. For example this one:
Bartlett Lofts

That's too high for rent in my opinion ..but someone from Manhattan might view it as 'cheap'
Of course not. Manhattan has absurdly high rents.
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