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Old 10-15-2014, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles (Native)
25,306 posts, read 16,445,196 times
Reputation: 12186

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Quote:
Originally Posted by StreetLegal View Post
The bigger developments along Ocean Avenue are not new but decades old (as in 40 plus years).
Doesn't it take about 40yrs to get a building planned, approved and built in Santa Monica?
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Old 10-15-2014, 09:48 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles (Native)
25,306 posts, read 16,445,196 times
Reputation: 12186
Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
Yeah it is interesting that even in the places that Santa Monica and Pasadena are pretty autocentric, they are almost always more comfortable for pedestrians than equivalent areas in LA proper.
One reason for this is that they were first developed a while back before many people had cars.

In an area like the valley , where things were developed later on besides areas close to Ventura Blvd things aren't really that "walkable"

As these areas were developed when many people had cars , in other areas density was more of a necessity.

Now that people want to rely on their cars less because of costs and high traffic levels the pedestrians friendly areas have become more and more popular.

I see the areas we now consider to be suburban turning to become more 'citylike'
If population does continue to grow then higher density in currently low density areas seem inevitable.

If not for the complaints/lawsuits and strong homeowners associations many areas would already have been higher density.

There is real demand out there for condos/townhomes but the supply is being limited artificially..this of course helps to keep prices even higher.

Of course prices wouldn't be cheap...but new construction is so expensive now because it's such a novelty.

If instead of 1 new project at a time for example there were 4 new projects in an area that's clearly going to affect prices because of more competition.

Right now the developers that actually have the connections etc to get things approved are the ones benefiting.

With more projects the developers would still make money...but at a lower level.

If prices of construction became too high to make money and the developers stopped building..then you'd see the prices of construction come down too.
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Old 10-15-2014, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,535,786 times
Reputation: 3999
Quote:
Originally Posted by jm1982 View Post
One reason for this is that they were first developed a while back before many people had cars.

In an area like the valley , where things were developed later on besides areas close to Ventura Blvd things aren't really that "walkable"

As these areas were developed when many people had cars , in other areas density was more of a necessity.

Now that people want to rely on their cars less because of costs and high traffic levels the pedestrians friendly areas have become more and more popular.

I see the areas we now consider to be suburban turning to become more 'citylike'
If population does continue to grow then higher density in currently low density areas seem inevitable.

If not for the complaints/lawsuits and strong homeowners associations many areas would already have been higher density.

There is real demand out there for condos/townhomes but the supply is being limited artificially..this of course helps to keep prices even higher.

Of course prices wouldn't be cheap...but new construction is so expensive now because it's such a novelty.

If instead of 1 new project at a time for example there were 4 new projects in an area that's clearly going to affect prices because of more competition.

Right now the developers that actually have the connections etc to get things approved are the ones benefiting.

With more projects the developers would still make money...but at a lower level.

If prices of construction became too high to make money and the developers stopped building..then you'd see the prices of construction come down too.
I think the San Gabriel Valley will be a place that LA sees some increases in density, especially along the Gold Line (which runs through a lot of light-industrial and commercial areas that are perfect for some sensible density).
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Old 10-15-2014, 10:28 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles (Native)
25,306 posts, read 16,445,196 times
Reputation: 12186
Yeah I could see that..also sounds like there is a ton of investment for Asian investors in the area now.
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Old 10-15-2014, 01:17 PM
 
Location: Buena Park, Orange County, California
1,424 posts, read 1,982,276 times
Reputation: 1503
Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
I think the San Gabriel Valley will be a place that LA sees some increases in density, especially along the Gold Line (which runs through a lot of light-industrial and commercial areas that are perfect for some sensible density).
Quote:
Originally Posted by jm1982 View Post
Yeah I could see that..also sounds like there is a ton of investment for Asian investors in the area now.
I agree...plus culturally Asian Americans seem to have much more of an appreciation for 'urban' life. Wherever they become established you see a proliferation of late night cafes, restaurants, bars etc. Events like the 626 night market also keep expanding and growing in popularity with not just Asians, but everyone (626 Night Market - 2014). The only places I know in my area (Buena Park) that are open late (besides the typical hole in the wall Mexican or fast food chain) are Asian owned and operated. As a night owl, I really appreciate this import of culture into SoCal/LA/OC.

** I should note that by Asian, I meant East Asian (Koreans, Japanese, Chinese). To an extent I've noticed this with Vietnamese as well, but not so much other SE Asians or South Asians.
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Old 10-17-2014, 11:51 PM
 
Location: Macao
15,996 posts, read 37,248,691 times
Reputation: 9617
Quote:
Originally Posted by blacknwhiterose View Post
I've always thought that Pasadena or Long Beach should have been the model for Los Angeles. Take Old Town, put it down by the ocean, blow it up to the size of Chicago or Manhattan, and then L.A. would have been a bangin' cool city, a true spanish/mediterranean-y So Cal compliment to San Francisco.
That would be cool.
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Old 10-18-2014, 11:07 PM
 
Location: downtown
1,826 posts, read 1,309,977 times
Reputation: 408
Quote:
Originally Posted by RudyOD View Post
I agree...plus culturally Asian Americans seem to have much more of an appreciation for 'urban' life. Wherever they become established you see a proliferation of late night cafes, restaurants, bars etc. Events like the 626 night market also keep expanding and growing in popularity with not just Asians, but everyone (626 Night Market - 2014). The only places I know in my area (Buena Park) that are open late (besides the typical hole in the wall Mexican or fast food chain) are Asian owned and operated. As a night owl, I really appreciate this import of culture into SoCal/LA/OC.

** I should note that by Asian, I meant East Asian (Koreans, Japanese, Chinese). To an extent I've noticed this with Vietnamese as well, but not so much other SE Asians or South Asians.
some SE asians do this to?
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Old 10-20-2014, 02:17 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,996 posts, read 37,248,691 times
Reputation: 9617
Quote:
Originally Posted by RudyOD View Post
I agree...plus culturally Asian Americans seem to have much more of an appreciation for 'urban' life. Wherever they become established you see a proliferation of late night cafes, restaurants, bars etc. Events like the 626 night market also keep expanding and growing in popularity with not just Asians, but everyone (626 Night Market - 2014). The only places I know in my area (Buena Park) that are open late (besides the typical hole in the wall Mexican or fast food chain) are Asian owned and operated. As a night owl, I really appreciate this import of culture into SoCal/LA/OC.

** I should note that by Asian, I meant East Asian (Koreans, Japanese, Chinese). To an extent I've noticed this with Vietnamese as well, but not so much other SE Asians or South Asians.
Seoul is absolutely FANTASTIC with late night cafes, restaurants, bars, etc. All of South Korea is, and everything is very accessible, well-priced, convenient, etc.

I'm pretty sure it's Korean culture that is single-handedly revolutioning that in Los Angeles. Hope it continues nation-wide! It was one of the best things about living in Seoul for me.
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Old 10-20-2014, 12:04 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
401 posts, read 654,959 times
Reputation: 397
Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
I think the San Gabriel Valley will be a place that LA sees some increases in density, especially along the Gold Line (which runs through a lot of light-industrial and commercial areas that are perfect for some sensible density).
I'll agree that increasing density around the Gold Line is better than increasing the density elsewhere; however, I think we need to curb increasing density anywhere for the following reasons:

a) our "usable" transit network is not dense enough to take these new residents all the places they'll need to or want to go. Therefore, the vast majority of these new residents WILL own and use cars. More cars == more congestion. Besides the obvious deleterious effects of increased congestion.. perhaps counter-intuitively, it will also make it more difficult to improve other modes of transport like walking, biking, and rail given our built out environment here. Giving space to other modes, at this point, requires taking away from autos. The more congested it gets, the tougher it is to take away.

b) we already do not have enough water for the residents that live here. Adding more people will only make this worse.
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Old 10-20-2014, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Buena Park, Orange County, California
1,424 posts, read 1,982,276 times
Reputation: 1503
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Seoul is absolutely FANTASTIC with late night cafes, restaurants, bars, etc. All of South Korea is, and everything is very accessible, well-priced, convenient, etc.

I'm pretty sure it's Korean culture that is single-handedly revolutioning that in Los Angeles. Hope it continues nation-wide! It was one of the best things about living in Seoul for me.
Yeah, I agree, Korean culture is definitely the dominant force...but to a smaller extent so is the Taiwanese culture out of the SGV.

Seoul sounds amazing...can't wait to go someday!
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