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Old 06-23-2012, 07:11 AM
 
Location: Macao
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How many miles inland would you say you need to go before 'Mediterranean' climate turns to 'damn hot' climate?
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Old 06-23-2012, 08:27 AM
 
Location: La Crescenta, CA
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It's not necessarily the distance as much as it is the geographical features, particularly the way mountains trap heat or block or channel ocean air. For example, Pasadena's further inland than the Valley, but the Valley is hotter. (In summer the Valley counts as "damn hot.") As the crow flies, Downtown's not much closer to the ocean than, say, Burbank, but Downtown's cooler.

That said, it does seem like east of the 405 and then east of the 710 are rough dividing lines for increased temperatures. West of Downtown things definitely start getting warmer. When you're into SB County it's pretty damn hot. Going north on the 405 on a summer day with your windows open, once you get over "the hill" you can actually feel the moment when the air changes from cool to hot.
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Old 06-23-2012, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Sherman Oaks, CA
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Yes, you can feel the temperature changing as you go north (or south) on the 405. You can also feel the change when taking any of the canyon roads west of the 405 (Topanga, Kanan, etc.). One of the hottest areas in the Valley, Woodland Hills, is not very far from the ocean, but no cooling ocean breezes reach it due to the topography.
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Old 06-23-2012, 11:51 AM
 
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Agreed

Greater LA is a very fascinating area if you love understanding what causes microclimates.

Basically, although the further you get from the beach, the warmer it gets in the summer, but as long as you are still in the LA basin, you are not going to have mountains that totally block the ocean breezes from moving in, the way you do with the Santa Monica mountains blocking cooling breezes from moving into the SF valley, or the Puente-Whittier-Chino hills blocking breezes coming into the San Gabriel Valley/Inland Empire.

And since Woodland Hills is completely blocked by the SM mountains it NEVER gets those breezes.

Pasadena does have hill between it and downtown but they are not quite the high-wind blocking barriers the way the SM mountains are. Although in the summer if you want to spend a Saturday in cooler temps, one can go into the mountains up the Angeles crest where it will be at least 10 degrees cooler.

Agree about crossing the divide on the 405. You can easily draw a line in the sand where it jumps 20 degrees. Mulholland is the highest point, and around where it really changes.
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Old 06-23-2012, 12:51 PM
 
Location: Anaheim
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
How many miles inland would you say you need to go before 'Mediterranean' climate turns to 'damn hot' climate?
I think that even the true Mediterranean climate can still have its "damn hot" moments or even hours.

Köppen climate classification maps are very helpful with their color bands and codes, and the greater LA area does indeed encompass four or five of them.

Csa= summer dry, Mediterranean climate, along the coast and about ten miles inland.
BSk=semi-arid steppe with cool winters; farther inland and in the valleys
BWk=high desert (cold winters)
H=mountain climate, though could be given other codes that would apply elsewhere in the country (elevation higher and lower and movement northward or southward correspond to each other). There is continental and even alpine climate in the higher mountains.

I would say BWh which is desert with mild to warm winters but not sure if the Colorado basin desert (Palm Springs, El Centro, Indio, etc.) has warm enough winters for this category.
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Old 06-23-2012, 01:14 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrsltd View Post
I think that even the true Mediterranean climate can still have its "damn hot" moments or even hours.

Köppen climate classification maps are very helpful with their color bands and codes, and the greater LA area does indeed encompass four or five of them.

Csa= summer dry, Mediterranean climate, along the coast and about ten miles inland.
BSk=semi-arid steppe with cool winters; farther inland and in the valleys
BWk=high desert (cold winters)
H=mountain climate, though could be given other codes that would apply elsewhere in the country (elevation higher and lower and movement northward or southward correspond to each other). There is continental and even alpine climate in the higher mountains.

I would say BWh which is desert with mild to warm winters but not sure if the Colorado basin desert (Palm Springs, El Centro, Indio, etc.) has warm enough winters for this category.
That is correct.

And frankly, I would say the valleys are barely BSk. They definitely have winters almost warm enough to classify as BSh.

Mt. Baldy, highest in the San Gabriels is definitely above timberline, and is alpine. H (highland) is really jsut a catch all term for mountains and highlands in general, because there are SO many local variations. A north facing slope is going to have more moisture and more trees, than a south facing slope, which will be drier, and more brush.
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Old 06-23-2012, 06:34 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
How many miles inland would you say you need to go before 'Mediterranean' climate turns to 'damn hot' climate?
If you are in a valley obstructed by the sea breeze there will be a diff. Could be less than 20mi. from Sta. Monica to Valley but temps could diff by 20 deg. Distance will effect how well it cools though so East. LA County can get very hot.
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Old 06-23-2012, 11:16 PM
 
Location: L.A./O.C.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
How many miles inland would you say you need to go before 'Mediterranean' climate turns to 'damn hot' climate?
It's really based on geography but wait a week or two and that "damn hot" weather will be felt all over LA even at night, it's been damn hot these couple of weeks about the average being in high 70s and low 80s but that is normal for Los Angeles
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Old 10-07-2014, 12:17 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
How many miles inland would you say you need to go before 'Mediterranean' climate turns to 'damn hot' climate?
Compare Malibu to Woodland Hills/Thousand Oaks -- straightline distance separating Malibu from those locations is probably 10 miles or less, yet the summertime high temps are often 30+ degrees different. Thank the Santa Monica mountains for that along with the west-to-east primary wind flow.

Other 'damn hot' locations: Riverside, Hemet, San Bernardino, corona -- basically the whole Inland Empire qualifies as 'damn hot' in summer.
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