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Old 12-02-2007, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Avery Ranch, Austin, TX
8,355 posts, read 14,092,268 times
Reputation: 3615

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A couple of years ago, SIL drove us along PCH(or whatever you call the highway just along the beach), showing us house after house propped up on stilts MANY feet above the washed-out land below. Do these folks OWN the land directly below their soon-to-be gone house? Could they rebuild now on land that is practically at sea-level? There is no way that the formerly supportive land could be replaced/rebuilt. On the other hand, that land is adjacent to land that would probably wash away in the next mudslide. Between the fires and the mudslides, you folks have sure endured some tough times. Just wondering.
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Old 12-06-2007, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Avery Ranch, Austin, TX
8,355 posts, read 14,092,268 times
Reputation: 3615
OK, maybe my scope was a little too narrow. With the wildfires this year and certain rains to come, there will be more land/mudslides. When thousands of tons of earth wash away a home/homesite, do the owners just abandon the land? What about rebuilding on the land newly exposed? Do the original homeowners actually own the land 'below' their property? Many of these homes were on otherwise 'prime' real estate...has there been redevelopment of formerly washed out areas?
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Old 12-06-2007, 01:31 PM
 
2,573 posts, read 7,876,984 times
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i think it probably depends upon the kind of insurance coverage the homeowner has, and whether he is personally willing to take the risk of rebuilding and facing the same disaster a few years down the road. some are; some aren't. i know someone who bought a lot in malibu canyon dirt-cheap from a resident whose home had been destroyed in the firestorm back in 90-something and decided to walk away. he was able to get a loan to build his own home, and if it's still standing after last month's fires, it's probably worth a small fortune today.

when we had very heavy rains in 04/05, a house located on a busy canyon road i travel frequently collapsed and remained perilously perched a few feet above the roadway, with only a flimsy wire fence for a barrier. as that particular street is often jammed, i was very concerned that the next rain would send the rubble carreening into the inevitable long line of cars that forms right in that spot. i even tried to alert the city to the danger, as it seemed that the homeowner had either walked away, or was having trouble getting his insurance to pay for the removal. the house was finally removed about a year after its collapse, and the lot has sat empty ever since although it's in one of the city's most popular and desirable neighborhoods. either the land is too unstable to rebuild and the city won't allow it, or no one is, as yet, willing to take the risk.
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Old 12-06-2007, 01:41 PM
 
Location: West LA
723 posts, read 2,807,381 times
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Some people have a lot of money. They can afford to lose a house.
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Old 12-06-2007, 02:18 PM
 
2,573 posts, read 7,876,984 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JackSparrow View Post
Some people have a lot of money. They can afford to lose a house.
yes, that is why i said "as yet." that lot on laurel canyon will be developed again someday if the geologists give the go-ahead. of that, i have no doubt.
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Old 12-06-2007, 09:16 PM
 
1,297 posts, read 5,103,730 times
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Are you referring to the homes in the mud slide at La Conchita? or the homes in San diego that slid down the hill recently?

Landslide is not covered under homeowner insurance. So if your home slides down a hill or gets filled up with mud, its on you.

If the City wont let you rebuild due to instability, you end up with a piece of land. Generally though, you can core down to stable ground and rebuild.
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Old 12-06-2007, 10:50 PM
 
Location: Avery Ranch, Austin, TX
8,355 posts, read 14,092,268 times
Reputation: 3615
Quote:
Originally Posted by greggd View Post
Are you referring to the homes in the mud slide at La Conchita? or the homes in San diego that slid down the hill recently?
Our trip was up toward Topanga(I think), three? years ago...part of PCH was covered in mud and you could look WAY up and see the underside of some of the homes on the 'cliffs'. There was nothing under these homes for at least 100ft down toward the ocean hwy. How in the world could you put a value on this land for insurance or tax purposes...?...never mind trying to rebuild.
Sorry, not too sure why I thought of this as we are experiencing our driest year ON RECORD...back to the 1880s. Thank goodness Atlanta doesn't have mudslides to worry about. Be careful out there!
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Old 12-06-2007, 11:32 PM
 
1,297 posts, read 5,103,730 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 10scoachrick View Post
Our trip was up toward Topanga(I think), three? years ago...part of PCH was covered in mud and you could look WAY up and see the underside of some of the homes on the 'cliffs'. There was nothing under these homes for at least 100ft down toward the ocean hwy. How in the world could you put a value on this land for insurance or tax purposes...?...never mind trying to rebuild.
Sorry, not too sure why I thought of this as we are experiencing our driest year ON RECORD...back to the 1880s. Thank goodness Atlanta doesn't have mudslides to worry about. Be careful out there!
You may be referring to the slide a few miles north at rambla pacifico. Across the street from Duke's restaurant.

The county fixed up that hill nice and tidy. Its now an example of what our govt can do if they want. All graded, proper drainage, and retaining walls etc. There are still lots from previous landslides where nothing has been rebuilt. The ones you saw along the bluffs were rebuilt i believe.
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