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Old 04-27-2018, 01:58 AM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
5,881 posts, read 2,413,332 times
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An argument could be made for Cordova, Alaska, which was founded and named by the Spanish, authorized by the papal bull of 1493, and still has a 5% Hispanic population.
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Old 04-27-2018, 04:03 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
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Every public school and university in Los Angeles uses English as the primary language of curriculum and instruction.

I don’t consider that to be a Latin American city.
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Old 04-27-2018, 09:18 PM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
16,527 posts, read 23,140,422 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iron_stick View Post
Armenians are mostly concentrated in Glendale, Burbank, and Hollywood while Iranians mostly congregate around Beverly Hills, these 2 groups are nearly non-existent outside of their traditional base, and their numbers comes nowhere near that of Hispanics.
My point is that having the largest of any group doesn't make it such a city.
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Old 04-28-2018, 03:03 AM
 
Location: western East Roman Empire
7,371 posts, read 11,204,806 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iron_stick View Post
Does all this qualifies LA to be considered as part of Latin America?
People in the US were asking similar questions about their cities with respect to European immigration in the 1880s-1920s period.

People in the US have been asking the same question about Miami for the past decade or so.

People in the US were asking similar questions about Japan in the 1980s.

People all around the world have been asking similar questions about the role of English for at least three decades now.


We live in an era of globalization (it's cyclical in the long sweep of history). We are all becoming more like each other, for better and for worse.

At any rate, last time I checked, LA and Miami are still in US states under US administration. The rest is cheap talk. I would be more concerned about legality, fiscal and otherwise.

For what it's worth, over the period of a century or so, I noticed that by the third generation born in the US almost nothing is left of an ancestral language spoken by grandparents and great-grandparents.

True, if mass migration from one linguistic area continues over a century or so, it will have a lasting impact, but I notice there is immigration into the US from all over the world, and after a generation or two many Hispanics start to leave gateway cities like Los Angeles and Miami and go elsewhere, including the interior.

In the case of the outward expansion of English, it has been going on for some three centuries now, and we can confidently observe that it has had a lasting impact.

As for the impact of the immigration of Hispanics into the US, it is still early days and it may prove to be ephemeral.

In the meantime, it doesn't hurt to learn some Spanish. I did, fluently, and it really didn't not make a significant difference in life, same problems, same challenges, just a different style of talk which is always, always, always cheap.

Illegality is expensive, very expensive.

Good Luck!
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Old 04-28-2018, 03:53 AM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
10,487 posts, read 8,496,922 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Turnerbro View Post
While we're at it. Quebec City is further north and has a higher % of French speakers.
Just because French people speak a Latin language that doesn't make them Latinos. Lol.

Same thing with Arabs. Unlike Jews, they aren't normally called Semitic, even though they're by definition still "Semites" and speak a Semitic language like their Jewish counterparts. They are even called "antisemitic" oddly, when they discriminate against Jews.

Pretty weird, I know.
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Old 04-28-2018, 04:55 AM
 
Location: western East Roman Empire
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethereal View Post
Just because French people speak a Latin language that doesn't make them Latinos. Lol.

Same thing with Arabs. Unlike Jews, they aren't normally called Semitic, even though they're by definition still "Semites" and speak a Semitic language like their Jewish counterparts. They are even called "antisemitic" oddly, when they discriminate against Jews.

Pretty weird, I know.
Language is a tool in the mouth of a speaker.

You don't have to listen, and give it the value that it deserves.

Last edited by bale002; 04-28-2018 at 05:08 AM..
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Old 04-28-2018, 06:51 AM
 
10,344 posts, read 10,822,207 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Turnerbro View Post
While we're at it. Quebec City is further north and has a higher % of French speakers.

The original term was Amérique latine to consider French-speaking territories in the Americas, (French Canadians, French Louisiana, French Guiana, Haiti, Guadeloupe, Martinique, Saint Martin, Saint Barthélemy) along with the larger group of countries where Spanish and Portuguese languages prevailed, including the Spanish-speaking portions of the United States (the Southwest and Florida.)

It's important to note that in the 19th century while northern America continued to look to Britain as the center of Anglo culture, much of Latin America looked towards France instead of Spain and Portugal which had slipped into the backwater of European culture.

Today, areas of Canada and the United States (with the exception of Puerto Ricoi) where Spanish, French, and Portuguese are predominant are typically not included in definitions of Latin America.

The US census categorizes people by "self identification" so many people who check the Latino/Hispanic box speak little or no Spanish. The scientific term "Chicano English" has developed to refer to people who speak English with intonations of Spanish, but do not speak any Spanish at all.

The census bureau chose to use the term "Hispanic" instead of "Hispanophone". The latter would be people who velieve they speak Spanish, while the first term identifies an ethnic group. Some US citizens view themselves as Irish-Americans even if it has been 150 years since their ancestors emigrated from Ireland, and some US citizens view themselves as Italian-Americans even if it has been 100 years. Certainly some "Hispanics" in southern Texas have ancestors that go back over 200 years.

TRIVIA: The original objections to citizens of USA using the term "American" to refer to themselves instead of all of the "Americas" cam from the French in the early 1800s. The denonym originated in colonial times to distinguish the people under British rule who lived in the colonies. But as the US became a global power after the civil war, Latin American intellectuals regarded the use of the term as unfair. You still see Estadunidenses or "United Statesian" in most formal papers while the term "Americano" is informal.
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Old 04-28-2018, 07:15 AM
BMI
 
Location: Ontario
7,342 posts, read 4,989,467 times
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No.....that would be Yakima, Washington.
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Old 04-28-2018, 08:31 AM
 
550 posts, read 252,137 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bale002 View Post

For what it's worth, over the period of a century or so, I noticed that by the third generation born in the US almost nothing is left of an ancestral language spoken by grandparents and great-grandparents.
While this might be true in other areas of the country, it doesn't apply to Los Angeles. When the vast majority of the student body comes from Hispanic households, when most the population use (even US-born) use Spanish on a daily basis, when all official forms/inscriptions comes in Spanish, staying away from the language is nearly impossible in LA.

Quote:
True, if mass migration from one linguistic area continues over a century or so, it will have a lasting impact, but I notice there is immigration into the US from all over the world, and after a generation or two many Hispanics start to leave gateway cities like Los Angeles and Miami and go elsewhere, including the interior.
I have been living in LA for a few years and have not noticed that. Hispanics tend to stick to LA for many reason, one of them is feeling at home more so than they would in Portland.

Quote:
As for the impact of the immigration of Hispanics into the US, it is still early days and it may prove to be ephemeral.
Your statement gives away a superficial knowledge on the issue.
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Old 04-28-2018, 06:35 PM
 
Location: western East Roman Empire
7,371 posts, read 11,204,806 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iron_stick View Post


I have been living in LA for a few years ...



Your statement gives away a superficial knowledge on the issue.

Your statement gives away a superficial knowledge on the issue.

There is nothing unique about Los Angeles, and certainly not after a few years.

It is still early days, we simply don't know how things will evolve.

We can begin to draw some tentative observations after about 3-4 generations and with confidence after about 200-300 years.

In the meantime, don't hold your breath, you'll turn blue in the face.
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