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Old 05-28-2020, 09:14 PM
 
7 posts, read 2,948 times
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I am looking at using a VA home loan to get a condo (selling home in Virginia first) and initially looked online to get a sense of Tarzana, since there are approved buildings there, but saw there is liquefaction by looking at the CalHazards map. It is also in other areas of LA county that I looked at, but there is one part of Canoga Park and also Reseda and Van Nuys that are not in these liquefaction zones. I'm from Virginia originally and wondered what happens to, say, a two or three story stucco condo building sitting in liquefaction zones in an earthquake?? I was thinking about just ignoring that as a factor, but then also saw how there are "earthquake gas shutoffs" in some buildings (????) mentioned in listings, and it occurred to me that if the building shifts and gas lines break etc, then that is a bad outcome. I am asking because I'm not used to factoring in earthquakes in this equation. A lot of the LA area is just in liquefaction zones and so I am guessing it is not that big of a deal? Or, would one want to factor that in, when picking a place to buy. I'm more of a contingency planning type, so it caught my attention immediately after first visiting that CalHazards website that maps out fires, fault lines, and liquefaction zones.
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Old 05-28-2020, 09:55 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
3,818 posts, read 2,064,572 times
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Originally Posted by KARW43 View Post
I am looking at using a VA home loan to get a condo (selling home in Virginia first) and initially looked online to get a sense of Tarzana, since there are approved buildings there, but saw there is liquefaction by looking at the CalHazards map. It is also in other areas of LA county that I looked at, but there is one part of Canoga Park and also Reseda and Van Nuys that are not in these liquefaction zones. I'm from Virginia originally and wondered what happens to, say, a two or three story stucco condo building sitting in liquefaction zones in an earthquake?? I was thinking about just ignoring that as a factor, but then also saw how there are "earthquake gas shutoffs" in some buildings (????) mentioned in listings, and it occurred to me that if the building shifts and gas lines break etc, then that is a bad outcome. I am asking because I'm not used to factoring in earthquakes in this equation. A lot of the LA area is just in liquefaction zones and so I am guessing it is not that big of a deal? Or, would one want to factor that in, when picking a place to buy. I'm more of a contingency planning type, so it caught my attention immediately after first visiting that CalHazards website that maps out fires, fault lines, and liquefaction zones.
I have always associated liquefaction with the land around Marina Del Rey but you are right that the entire southern half of the San Fernando Valley is a liquefaction zone.

No matter where you buy in LA County...you are buying in an area known for seismic activity. So buyer beware.

https://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/...htmlstory.html

When you are looking at a particular building or unit you can request the HOA documents including a record of any special assessments. These items can be a guide to potential seismic issues the building may or may not have.

Perhaps more importantly I would look carefully at the type of construction of any unit you consider buying. That can have a big influence on how it performs in a quake.

The City of LA passed a mandatory e-quake retrofit program for pre-1978 wood-frame soft-story buildings and non-ductile concrete buildings. These buildings have been prone to fail in an earthquake.

https://www.ladbs.org/services/core-...rofit-programs
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