U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > California > Los Angeles
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-05-2008, 06:24 PM
 
Location: NYC
278 posts, read 1,112,488 times
Reputation: 89

Advertisements

I am going to ask this question hoping for serious answers so please no funny stuff people. I want to know how do you really prepare for a earthquake. I know in outdoor situations you really can't but how would you do it at home? What are some precautions you guys take to make sure you and your family is safe? I always had the idea of having a room in the house/condo/apt where you don't have anything hung up and plan on using it in case of a earthquake. Since nothing would be hanging up you'd be pretty safe yeah? What's the best way to make sure your okay? Where exactly is the fault line in LA? If a earthquake was to come would WeHo get hit pretty hard? What areas are most at risk? I know these are a alot of questions but I'm sure many people want to know.
Thanks,
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-05-2008, 06:34 PM
 
Location: Hot Springs, AR
5,612 posts, read 13,800,305 times
Reputation: 3759
Bolt everything to the wall. Make sure you have fresh batteries for a FLASHLIGHT. Have fresh batteries for a RADIO. NEVER NEVER NEVER strike a match or light a candle after an earthquake. NEVER NEVER NEVER strike a match or light a candle after an earthquake. Buy an earthquake kit. Most come with first aid kit, 3 day supply of food and water. Have cash. ATMs maybe down. Have a suitcase packed in case you can't stay in the house. Have an out-of-state phone number that EVERYBODY has in case you get separated. Have a meeting place in case you are not together. Have a document with any allergies and blood type listed and list everyone who lives in the house, include insurance information, and tape it in an envelope near door or in front window labeled EMERGENCY INFORMATION. So if you can't speak for yourself, the envelope will.

During: Get under a table or desk (NOT GLASS) and cover your head. or Get in a doorway and hold onto frame. Get out as quickly as it is safe to do so, using your FLASHLIGHT to guide you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2008, 06:36 PM
 
Location: San DiFrangeles, Ca
489 posts, read 1,785,291 times
Reputation: 255
Wow it's been so long since we've had a big earthquake here I rarely think about them. What has it been, 14 years now? In our house we make sure pictures are hung by nails in a stud (a lil more stability) and are going to install those clasps that hold cupboard doors shut. We have a 42" plasma that we don't want to hang, so we are going to find a way to strap it to the stand it's on without looking tacky. Bookcases are best screwed into studs in the wall. We keep a flashlight by the bed (remember to check the batteries periodically). We need to get a kit together with water, shoes, etc... those are very important to keep in reach. Most will now tell you that your safest place in your home is NOT under a door-frame but under a table. When I think about it though I'll probably run under the door-frame because they instill that into your head so much as a child here. But most important to be prepared is to not worry about it! Don't waste your life worrying about something you may never experience. There are numerous faults that run under LA, click here to see a map. Funny thing is that many of the faults that produce earthquakes are undiscovered faults, so nowhere here is immune to earthquakes. Like I said, don't worry about it. If it happens it does. Concentrate more on enjoying your new life!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2008, 06:43 PM
 
Location: NYC
278 posts, read 1,112,488 times
Reputation: 89
Thanks for the great responses. This forum is so helpful.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2008, 08:10 PM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
26,345 posts, read 84,701,631 times
Reputation: 17581
Install a gas shut off valve at your gas meter.
Secure everything to the wall (which I do here in Colorado anyway because little kids can pull TVs and dressers on top of them).
Consider an earthquake insurance policy.
Consider owning a 1000 watt or so generator - so that way you can post to City Data if you have a phone line and modem. If you have a well, consider a 220 Volt three phase generator to run your well pump motor.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2008, 08:17 PM
 
2,573 posts, read 7,873,802 times
Reputation: 2558
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles View Post
Install a gas shut off valve at your gas meter.
Secure everything to the wall (which I do here in Colorado anyway because little kids can pull TVs and dressers on top of them).
Consider an earthquake insurance policy.
Consider owning a 1000 watt or so generator - so that way you can post to City Data if you have a phone line and modem. If you have a well, consider a 220 Volt three phase generator to run your well pump motor.
oh, dear! it looks like i'm woefully unprepared for the big one! i have three cans of tuna, some bottled water, and a flashlight.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2008, 08:49 PM
 
Location: SoCal
14,527 posts, read 16,116,085 times
Reputation: 10450
Grab right ankle in right hand. Grab left ankle in left hand. Put head between legs. Kiss your arse goodbye.

Seriously, most of us ignore preparedness. You should do the opposite, prepare.

My own form of preparation: I'm preparing to move away hopefully before the next quake. Maybe headed to AZ or NM. I'll leave it up to you all to solve the problem. I'm retiring. I'm outta here in the next few years. I just hope we don't have a big one before then.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-06-2008, 12:52 AM
 
1,297 posts, read 5,102,002 times
Reputation: 566
depends on what type of building you live in. If you are in pre 1960s, no shearing on exterior walls and there is a probability of more structural damage.2nd floor Units over Tuck under parking are more likely to fail as the support beams are not to current code. At least you will only fall about 8 feet though and most likely be laying in bed.

I would suggest you have nothing that can fall onto your bed. like a tv, mirror, dresser etc. When an earthquake comes along, simply do what the natives do. Lay in bed for about 30 seconds and it will stop then go back to sleep. If its major, check for any damage.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-06-2008, 06:58 AM
 
Location: Sherman Oaks, CA
6,294 posts, read 15,771,894 times
Reputation: 8353
I would never live in a building that has a soft first story, such as a parking garage with apartment units above it. I would also never live in the parts of Sherman Oaks that got hit real hard in 1994 (Dickens St., Willis, etc.).

Standing in a doorway is old advice, and the Red Cross hasn't recommended doing that for quite some time. The advice now is "duck, cover, and hold". Duck under a large, sturdy piece of furniture, such as a desk. Stay on your hands and knees so you can crawl and stay under the furniture if it moves.

I'd rather live here and experience earthquakes than in other parts of the world. They don't measure deaths in hundreds, but rather in hundreds of thousands due to poor construction.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-06-2008, 07:07 AM
 
Location: Long Beach, CA
2,072 posts, read 11,243,311 times
Reputation: 1751
Stock up water, canned goods (that are OK to eat cold), can opener. Toilet paper and hefty bags, <--------- in case the water is turned off and your toilet won't flush.

Actually the last couple earthquakes we've had, I've never been without electricity or water, but you never know about the next one, which I feel we're due for.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > California > Los Angeles
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top