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Old 05-25-2008, 02:58 AM
 
51 posts, read 254,383 times
Reputation: 49

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I was under the impression some neighborhoods and community groups on the way to the west side are continuously fighting against any sort of public transport that would bring THEM OUTSIDERS their way...

Also, once upon a time Los Angeles had one of the best transportation systems in the country: Los Angeles Public Transportation

History repeats itself...
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Old 05-25-2008, 06:07 PM
 
Location: CITY OF ANGELS AND CONSTANT DANGER
5,409 posts, read 11,557,152 times
Reputation: 2251
ya that GLAM map is great. so tell me if we did have a grid like that one... where do you suggest it begin?

in the densest areas?
where ridership is high?

howabout where it is least expensive?

a funny thing about that map is that it follows old rail lines that once served LA. funnier is that a lot of this tracks are still visible...mostly on the areas directly east and south of downtown of course. they criss cross through out this part of town and only really serve to "park" rail cars from time to time. other lines were paved over, but you can tell where the were because a grass median divides traffic in opposing directions, like huntington drive.
some really great maps exist from the early century to the 60's and it seems that LA once had it right. i imagine if they did try to replicate a system like that they would start where

its dense.
transit dependant
cheap

that makes sense.
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Old 05-27-2008, 11:36 AM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,739 posts, read 26,337,518 times
Reputation: 9184
Quote:
Originally Posted by the one View Post
ya that GLAM map is great. so tell me if we did have a grid like that one... where do you suggest it begin?

in the densest areas?
where ridership is high?

howabout where it is least expensive?

a funny thing about that map is that it follows old rail lines that once served LA. funnier is that a lot of this tracks are still visible...mostly on the areas directly east and south of downtown of course. they criss cross through out this part of town and only really serve to "park" rail cars from time to time. other lines were paved over, but you can tell where the were because a grass median divides traffic in opposing directions, like huntington drive.
some really great maps exist from the early century to the 60's and it seems that LA once had it right. i imagine if they did try to replicate a system like that they would start where

its dense.
transit dependant
cheap

that makes sense.
It already begins in Downtown. I don't get why you don't understand this. LA already has a small, BASIC system that is centered in Downtown LA, where it's dense. The lines start to move out to cheaper, transit dependent communities like South LA, East LA, etc.... You said LA should have a transit system that is centered in Downtown LA and move out from there, yet it already has that. Honestly, I don't get what you are trying to say and you don't seem to know what you're talking about. The basic system already does what you suggest it should.
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Old 01-20-2009, 04:40 PM
 
126 posts, read 334,850 times
Reputation: 66
Default Subway West Side

You are correct! Look at the city officials and you can see that there is a 3rd world culture operating the city...This is the primary reason you don't see mass transit that is practical. They are building a rail from downtown to Culver City, although it will run down Exposition Blvd. Yeah, I can see people in Culver City getting on that train. P-l-e-e-z-e! Instead of running down a business district that has restaurants, shopping centers,
nightlife, etc. they chose Exposition blvd. Not may desireable stops along that route. Anyone with an ounce of smarts would have run the rail down Beverly or 3rd street where people from the westside actually feel safe to ride let along have places along the way that people would want to get on and off. Go figure...That's your Mayor!
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Old 01-20-2009, 04:56 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,739 posts, read 26,337,518 times
Reputation: 9184
Quote:
Originally Posted by alaplex View Post
You are correct! Look at the city officials and you can see that there is a 3rd world culture operating the city...This is the primary reason you don't see mass transit that is practical. They are building a rail from downtown to Culver City, although it will run down Exposition Blvd. Yeah, I can see people in Culver City getting on that train. P-l-e-e-z-e! Instead of running down a business district that has restaurants, shopping centers,
nightlife, etc. they chose Exposition blvd. Not may desireable stops along that route. Anyone with an ounce of smarts would have run the rail down Beverly or 3rd street where people from the westside actually feel safe to ride let along have places along the way that people would want to get on and off. Go figure...That's your Mayor!
The reason that route was chosen is b/c there is already an existing right of way there as it used to be a street car line. It is much easier and MUCH CHEAPER to build a line along Exposition Blvd's Right-of-way than down Beverly or 3rd. Plus there is a lot of transit dependent population along that corridor. Basically its about funding and priorities, even though a subway to the Westside is VERY important, the Expo line was cheaper and easier to build so it was done over a subway to the sea since funding was available for it.
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Old 01-20-2009, 05:16 PM
 
1,297 posts, read 5,107,263 times
Reputation: 566
The other reason the exposition route was chosen is because there is a lot of "cheaper" land that has development potential. Several large housing and retail projects can be developed along this route with less density restrictions.

Factor: cheaper land, the ability to build more units per lot sq footage, less parking requirements and you have a very attractive redevelopment area for many prospective landowners and developers.


I've been looking at the expo route, and I think it should swing south at Sepulveda and head down the 405 (not on top, but adjacent to the frwy on the other side of the sound wall) to Culver where there is also old railroad easements, than along Culver go West to Marina del rey, then North up Lincoln to Santa Monica.

West LA needs a line down either Wilshire or Santa Monica Blvd that includes Stops in Beverly Hills, Century City, Westwood/UCLA, VA, and all the way down to downtown SM.

Eventually a line that runs along the side of the 405 (there is plenty of land on either side of the 405) from the north valley could be incorporated and continue down to LAX & Beyond.
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Old 01-20-2009, 05:19 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,610 posts, read 21,121,123 times
Reputation: 5369
Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
The reason that route was chosen is b/c there is already an existing right of way there as it used to be a street car line. It is much easier and MUCH CHEAPER to build a line along Exposition Blvd's Right-of-way than down Beverly or 3rd. Plus there is a lot of transit dependent population along that corridor. Basically its about funding and priorities, even though a subway to the Westside is VERY important, the Expo line was cheaper and easier to build so it was done over a subway to the sea since funding was available for it.
I'm not sure how easy or cheap the construction of this line really is. I see this construction every single day and it doesn't look like any progress has been made since almost a year ago when I first came out to LA to visit USC. It seems like every day it's flat bed trucks humming back and forth and big trackers digging up dirt and putting it back. Then again, I'm no construction manager so I don't know what's really going on, but I wouldn't be surprised if this construction is an extremely inefficient waste of money. I drive down Exposition Blvd all the time and I sure wouldn't want to be stuck there. To be fair, Rodeo Rd (after it veers off from Exposition), just a little bit south of the future line is actually pleasant looking (but I still don't feel safe there), but Jefferson Blvd, just a few blocks north is just plain ghetto. Good or bad, it won't matter for me, because I'll have long graduated and moved on by the time this project is even finished.
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Old 01-20-2009, 08:24 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
1,627 posts, read 3,796,581 times
Reputation: 1780
Quote:
Originally Posted by greggd View Post
I have many ideas about public transportation. Working on putting together a website, but its slow going due to my lack of code ability..

Any train/rail system has to be planned and executed all at once. None this 5 mile extention every 10 years. That a political game and waste of time & money.

Taking a picture of the valley and west la: Trains to run along "the side" of the 405 & 10 frwys generally along the no-mans land just outside the barrier is the cheapest option. This section of land is generally unused all along the 405 even down through brentwood and south. There is always a good 30-40 feet of landspacing that can serve as the bed/footing for rail lines. If there isnt at some spots..sorry should have known when you bought that real estate next to the big concrete thing with cars.

Key stations would provide parking and access to other rails that can run along the major streets.. for example: Sherman Way, Victory Blvd, Ventura Blvd, Wilshire Blvd, Santa Monica Blvd, Olympic, Pico, Etc. I'm leaving out the No/So. lines. The trains, would run on the same rails but have different destinations. For example a southbound to downtown LA or a southbound to Santa monica. More trains during rush hours. slower trains with more stops depending on the need.
You are right about the price of the right-of-way along those highways...the problem is pedestrian access. It's a great situation if you have park & rides, etc..., but you have to couple rail construction with rezoning, tax laws, and other new construction along the corridor to ensure a usable, walkable area in conjunction with transit.
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Old 01-21-2009, 12:19 AM
 
956 posts, read 2,748,654 times
Reputation: 576
We may not have a monorail, but we have plenty of mono, thanks to Tony Villar's sanctuary city policy.
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Old 01-21-2009, 12:33 AM
 
Location: Mt Washington: NELA
1,162 posts, read 2,968,270 times
Reputation: 637
Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
The reason that route was chosen is b/c there is already an existing right of way there as it used to be a street car line. It is much easier and MUCH CHEAPER to build a line along Exposition Blvd's Right-of-way than down Beverly or 3rd. Plus there is a lot of transit dependent population along that corridor. Basically its about funding and priorities, even though a subway to the Westside is VERY important, the Expo line was cheaper and easier to build so it was done over a subway to the sea since funding was available for it.
Exactly. I was present at Expo Line meetings where the route was a no-brainer. I recall one at Hamilton HS, and the other deep in the heart of Cheviot Hills. This line had grassroots support from the start, with Westsiders pushing MTA hard to get the line considered and eventually funded. And if Pasadenans can use the Gold Line, why on earth wouldn't Culver City residents or other Westsiders take the train downtown and then some? There are LOTS of people in Cheviot, Santa Monica, Palms and C City who support the train wholeheartedly and can't wait for it be a reality.

The Transit Coalition has a great Expo Line discussion group @ The Transit Coalition - Metro Exposition Light Rail Transit Project - Mid City and Westside Phases.

There is also strong support for the line within Cheviot Hills, long thought to be a bastion of anti-Expo ROW sentiment. These people have a website as well:

Light Rail for Cheviot
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