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Old 08-02-2009, 09:11 AM
 
1,714 posts, read 5,547,127 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by subPrimeTime View Post
I work in the transportation planning/engineering industry, and I'm fairly optimistic about the future of the Los Angeles area. Slowly but surely, efficient public transit is coming along. The Exposition Light Rail Phase 1 (Downtown to Culver City) should be complete by Summer/Fall 2010 and Phase 2 (Culver City to Santa Monica) is in planning stages, hopefully to be completed in 4-5 years.
Do you happen to know when the Gold Line East Side Extension is due to open? I know this summer, but when exactly?
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Old 08-02-2009, 11:28 AM
 
Location: West Los Angeles
1,115 posts, read 1,608,493 times
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Good question, I thought it was to be by the end of this summer, but I don't usually travel that way, so I'm not sure. I'll ask someone at work tomorrow and get back to you.
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Old 08-02-2009, 11:40 AM
 
Location: West Los Angeles
1,115 posts, read 1,608,493 times
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One thing I love about LA is: The Lakers of course. So, whenever I hear sportscasters/media say that Madison Square Garden is the world's most famous arena, I think to myself could Staples Center be thought of that way one day? I truly believe it can. Obviously MSG has history and its Manhatten location on its side. But, MSG hasn't hosted a meaningful basketball game in 10 years (Knicks were in the Finals in 1999), the Big East tournament doesn't count. Meanwhile, the Purple n' Gold have won 4 titles (5 NBA finals appearances) since the building opened in 1999. Plus, the LA Live area has been getting a lot publicity now that ESPN films the 10pm Sportscenter there.

But to truly be famous, an arena needs to reach more than just sports fans. So, the whole Michael Jackson memorial ceremony will prove to be a huge worldwide advertisement (indirectly of course) for Staples. Out-of-towners from around the world, who could care less about the NBA, will probably visit the area during their LA stay simply because they want to see what they saw on TV.

It takes time to build a legacy, but Staples/LA Live is a big thing for LA moving forward.
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Old 08-02-2009, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
26,345 posts, read 84,805,064 times
Reputation: 17581
Quote:
Originally Posted by subPrimeTime View Post
One thing I love about LA is: The Lakers of course. So, whenever I hear sportscasters/media say that Madison Square Garden is the world's most famous arena, I think to myself could Staples Center be thought of that way one day? I truly believe it can. Obviously MSG has history and its Manhatten location on its side. But, MSG hasn't hosted a meaningful basketball game in 10 years (Knicks were in the Finals in 1999), the Big East tournament doesn't count. Meanwhile, the Purple n' Gold have won 4 titles (5 NBA finals appearances) since the building opened in 1999. Plus, the LA Live area has been getting a lot publicity now that ESPN films the 10pm Sportscenter there.

But to truly be famous, an arena needs to reach more than just sports fans. So, the whole Michael Jackson memorial ceremony will prove to be a huge worldwide advertisement (indirectly of course) for Staples. Out-of-towners from around the world, who could care less about the NBA, will probably visit the area during their LA stay simply because they want to see what they saw on TV.

It takes time to build a legacy, but Staples/LA Live is a big thing for LA moving forward.
The Staples Center isn't even in the top five venues in Los Angeles for significance, fame or history.

You'd rank the Staples Center over the mammoth Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum or the Rose Bowl or Santa Anita or Dodger Stadium?

Or, the Fabulous Forum, Anaheim Stadium, Hollywood Park?
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Old 08-02-2009, 01:23 PM
 
Location: West Los Angeles
1,115 posts, read 1,608,493 times
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Well I'm only talking about arenas here. I'm not going into the Rose Bowls, Wrigley Fields, Lambeau Fields, etc. Those are sports shrines no doubt. I'm talking about indoor arenas and the common sentiment is that Madison Square Garden is the world's most famous.
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Old 08-02-2009, 01:39 PM
 
2,325 posts, read 6,327,265 times
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Look to the environmentalists, they block every attempt for more energy, more water, more land, but advocate open immigration, the very thing that is sinking the quality of life. It is all politics in the quest for power.
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Old 08-02-2009, 05:59 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, Ca
2,884 posts, read 5,294,057 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by majoun View Post
You don't sound too sure of that below.



Detroit doesnt have immigrants from the Middle East?



This contradicts what you said above.

Do you remember what L.A. was like in the early '90s? It was worse than now (although it is headed in a bad direction).I beg to differ about the city being in shambles compared to then. In fact you even admitted downtown and Hollywood are unquestionably in much better shape now than in the early '90s (Hollywood then resembled Koreatown now more than it resembled Hollywood now). Venice and Silver Lake are also definitely better off than the early '90s. And even though violent crime is increasing again it would take a pretty massive increase for it to get to the levels of the '90s (although this is quite possible)

Only if you're talking about the Valley would you think L.A. is a shambles compared to '92. The Valley's definitely worse off. Also, LAUSD is worse off although that was well on its way down by '92.



Those "small enclaves" are larger now than in '92, and those "millions of poor" existed then.

You are the only person on the boards who's claimed that the present is worse than the early '90s rather than worrying about the early '90s coming back. What do you base that on?



As it is now, what you describe is no different than what exists elsewhere in the US and world. That could describe the Bay Area also, but the Bay Area seems immune to riots except for Oakland.

And remember the state had a similar budget crisis complete with IOUs in '92 as well under Wilson.

True "recipes for riots" would be perhaps the planned release of 30K prisoners who'd become homeless, and/or a Katrina type disaster.



Eventually it won't. The chances of water running out are EXTREMELY high. I'm more pessimistic about continuing access to water than anything else. And considering that L.A. never really did totally recover from April '92, if there is a comparable riot again than L.A. will be totally through.
As a whole, LA is in much worst shape than '92.

-Certainly the valley is worst.
-Schools are worst, LAUSD.
-Much more congestion, traffic.
-Infrastructure thats declined.
-Much larger gap betwen the rich and poor.
-$4 gas. Gas in the 90's was a dollar something.
-Politically in LA and Ca. That'd be another topic. But 17 years of compounding the problems.

Parts of it are better, downtown, hollywood, venice. Culver City looks great. But on the whole, its less livable than it was then, for the average person.

I dont keep up with the crime statistics year to year, but I know some of it is gang related, which really doesn't affect the average person. Why hasn't crime gone up as unemployment has gone up?

Detroit and the cities in the east were based on the auto industry, manufacturing, etc. I think LA draws more entrepreneurial immigrants than other cities. There are still too many positives in LA.

The valley may end up like detroit, I dont know.

But mostly I'm judging it on infrastucture, gap between rich/poor, high gas, high inflation vs 92. As the recipe for a riot. Another issue might be the budget cuts in the uc's and cal states, and the fee increases. Where the average person feels like they're getting priced out of the system. Combined with mediocre k-12.

But parts of it are great since 92, Staples/La Live, Hollywood, etc.

The water/power issue I dont follow closely.
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Old 08-02-2009, 06:06 PM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
26,345 posts, read 84,805,064 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John23 View Post
As a whole, LA is in much worst shape than '92.

-Certainly the valley is worst.
-Schools are worst, LAUSD.
-Much more congestion, traffic.
-Infrastructure thats declined.
-Much larger gap betwen the rich and poor.
-$4 gas. Gas in the 90's was a dollar something.
-Politically in LA and Ca. That'd be another topic. But 17 years of compounding the problems.

Parts of it are better, downtown, hollywood, venice. Culver City looks great. But on the whole, its less livable than it was then, for the average person.

I dont keep up with the crime statistics year to year, but I know some of it is gang related, which really doesn't affect the average person. Why hasn't crime gone up as unemployment has gone up?

Detroit and the cities in the east were based on the auto industry, manufacturing, etc. I think LA draws more entrepreneurial immigrants than other cities. There are still too many positives in LA.

The valley may end up like detroit, I dont know.

But mostly I'm judging it on infrastucture, gap between rich/poor, high gas, high inflation vs 92. As the recipe for a riot. Another issue might be the budget cuts in the uc's and cal states, and the fee increases. Where the average person feels like they're getting priced out of the system. Combined with mediocre k-12.

But parts of it are great since 92, Staples/La Live, Hollywood, etc.

The water/power issue I dont follow closely.
You didnt' mention this.

Immigrants who flocked to the once-burgeoning Inland Empire are hard-hit in economic downturn - Los Angeles Times

Look at this graphic (I'd post it but it is protected and I am in the City Data dog house)

http://www.latimes.com/media/graphic...7/48403992.gif
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Old 08-02-2009, 06:31 PM
 
Location: Mission Viejo, CA
2,498 posts, read 10,459,171 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John23 View Post
As a whole, LA is in much worst shape than '92.
-Schools are worst, LAUSD.
One could argue that LAUD is the "worst of the worst" of large urban school districts in the country, but you will find that there are few (if any) high quality public school systems in large cities anywhere in this country (and NOT charter or magnet campuses). Almost nationwide the high ranking, high performing schools are in suburbs surrounding the city in the center. Basically, this is a nationwide problem not unique to L.A. IMO.

Check out this link and check the cities that are on the map: School Performance Maps

You will notice something: All the "red" schools with rankings of 1, 2, or 3 out of 10 are in the center of a metro area, in the city itself. Houston, Dallas, Oakland, San Jose, Baltimore, Denver, San Francisco, Miami, Orlando, etc.... on the map show the "bad" schools in the city and the "good" schools in surrounding suburbs. Ask these cities what they think of the large school district like Houston Independent School District, New York Public Schools, Chicago Public Schools, Denver Public Schools, etc... and most people don't have high regards just like people here don't like LAUSD. Education is in a sad state in most major cities in this country. New York City isn't that different where most people that can put their kids in private school.
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Old 08-02-2009, 07:00 PM
 
Location: Earth
17,444 posts, read 24,742,386 times
Reputation: 7322
Quote:
Originally Posted by John23 View Post
But mostly I'm judging it on infrastucture, gap between rich/poor, high gas, high inflation vs 92. As the recipe for a riot
Maybe once the released inmates get out.

The other things you mentioned aren't really that different from many other places in the US which haven't had riots any time recently. And inflation right now is less of a problem than it was due to the economic crisis. If anything we're in a deflationary environment.

And if you think L.A. is more riot prone than other cities than I'm not so sure you DON'T think it could turn into Detroit. (BTW I don't think turning into Detroit is a certainty by any means, it's just looking more possible right now than it has in the past.)

Quote:
Another issue might be the budget cuts in the uc's and cal states, and the fee increases. Where the average person feels like they're getting priced out of the system. Combined with mediocre k-12.
Not unique to L.A. (Do you think the rest of the state has the "recipe for a riot" as well? The conditions you described are just as severe in the Bay Area - except for a very slightly better economy - and also exist in Sac, OC, and SD....)

Using the criteria you give there should have be large riots across the US every weekend as the "recipe for a riot" exists throughout the whole country according to your definition.

Can it happen again? Yes. In particular I'd worry about the mass prison releases. But those haven't happened yet.

The water/power issue is probably the most severe long term issue that L.A. has to face and you did briefly touch upon it by inferring to infrastructure.

And the decline of LAUSD was WELL under way in '92. One could say L.A. having fewer families with kids (due to LAUSD's problems) is negative, in some ways it is, in some ways it isn't.

OTOH LAPD in '92 was considerably worse than today. It still has its problems including its extreme understaffing but in '92 it was a completely failed department on a level with New Orleans.

BTW, re: infrastructure, what was the extent of the Metro system in '92 compared with '09? There was just the Red Line which was brand new at that point in time.

Don't get me wrong, I see a possibility of L.A. having a very bleak future, but you don't seem to have made up your mind whether it will or not.

Last edited by majoun; 08-02-2009 at 07:28 PM..
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